Tag Archives: those who wish to remain anonymous

James Lander/Those Who Wish To Remain Anonymous selected for Bow Open 2015

Following the recent screening of videos from the Balfron Tower/Rowlett Street Archives at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), part of The Brutalist Playground, James Lander/Those Who Wish To Remain Anonymous had their work selected for the STRUCTURE TEXTURE FUTURE exhibition at the Nunnery Gallery in London. The exhibition was selected and curated by Rosamond Murdoch, Nunnery Gallery Director and Dr. Shahidha Bari, writer, academic and critic, based in London. Bari is lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary University of London. James Lander/Those Who Wish To Remain Anonymous were selected alongside 14 others out of 500 Bow Artists.

The works selected gather around the interlocked themes of ruin and repair, as might be understood in the terms of the industrial and the natural. In many ways, this grounds the collection in its home in East London, a part of the city that is a heartland for creativity and making, but which is also constantly building and displacing.

The work included two copies of TimeOut magazine from the Balfron Tower/Rowlett Street Archives. The story written on Balfron Tower provoked responses on the TimeOut website forum and on the Balfron Tower Facebook group. These conversations are archived. A page from TimeOut was reproduced in the catalogue for the exhibition and two copies of the catalogue were reabsorbed into the Archives. The Balfron Tower/Rowlett Street Archives can be understood as a reciprocal conduit. One in which the materials gathered in the Archives which are up for debate and the materials these debates generate, such as the Time Out magazine and online comments, produce and are produced by the Archives, of which this announcement forms part. STRUCTURE TEXTURE FUTURE was on from 20 June to 5 July 2015, and the catalogue is available online.

Commissioned by the London County Council and known during development as Rowlett Street Phase 1, Balfron Tower was designed by Ernö Goldfinger as social housing. Built in 1968 and listed Grade II in 1996, Balfron Tower is described by English Heritage as having ‘a distinctive profile that sets it apart from other tall blocks. More importantly, it proved that such blocks could be well planned and beautifully finished, revealing Goldfinger as a master in the production of finely textured and long-lasting concrete masses.’ Ownership was subsequently transferred from Tower Hamlets Council to Poplar Housing and Regeneration Community Association (Poplar HARCA) who have managed the building since 2007. It was announced by ex-Mayor Lutfur Rahman on April Fools’ Day (2015) that ‘Poplar Harca were unable to afford the cost of refurbishing Balfron Tower without selling it on.’[1] Property developers Londonewcastle are lined up to sell all 146 flats on the private market in the near future.

In response to the planned refurbishment, which has been looming over Balfron Tower for the past five years, James Lander/Those Who Wish To Remain Anonymous established the BALFRON TOWER/Rowlett Street Archives in 2012. These Archives are made up of everything and nothing to do with their subject. From its historical beginnings as Rowlett Street, to the widely documented process of regeneration. From the artistic and cultural activities of recent years, to the overlooked traces and ephemera captured in common areas such as the north and south stairwells. The Archives include documentation, photographs, audio/video recordings and original features e.g. corridor tiles, fittings and fixtures. In amongst the Archives are private documents, for which permission to copy, reproduce or publish has been refused.

[1] Rahman, L. (2015) Statement on Balfron Tower. [Online] 1 April 2015. Available at: http://lutfurrahman.com/statement-balfron-tower/ [Accessed: 1 April 2015] Mayor at time of announcement subsequently removed from office due to electoral fraud.

The Brutalist Playground

Balfron Tower in Poplar, commissioned by the London County Council and known during development as Rowlett Street Phase 1, was designed by Ernö Goldfinger as social housing. Built in 1968 and listed Grade II in 1996, ownership was subsequently transferred from Tower Hamlets Council to the Poplar Housing and Regeneration Community Association (Poplar HARCA) who have managed the building since 2007. It was announced by Mayor Lutfur Rahman on April Fool’s Day (2015) that ‘Poplar Harca were unable to afford the cost of refurbishing Balfron Tower without selling it on.'[1]

Following on from a recent archival display at the Chelsea Café Project, managed by Sinéad Bligh, and the moving image screening during the Research Hub programme at The Cookhouse Gallery, organized by first year CCW research students, the BALFRON TOWER/Rowlett Street Archives will be included in a forthcoming evening event at RIBA on 9th June 2015 to launch The Brutalist Playground. RIBA, with Assemble and artist Simon Terrill, are hosting an evening of free talks, films, tours and more exploring the links between post-war architecture and urban play.

Part sculpture, part architectural installation, all play, The Brutalist Playground is a new commission by Assemble and artist Simon Terrill exploring post-war design for play. Occupying the entire Architecture Gallery at RIBA, it encourages visitors to look at the materiality and visual language of now lost Brutalist landscapes in new ways through an immersive and conceptual landscape.

In the run up to the planned refurbishment of Balfron Tower, the installation at RIBA will offer a timely opportunity to consider this internationally acknowledged building from a different perspective.

The BALFRON TOWER/Rowlett Street Archives were established by CCW PhD student James Lander/Those Who Wish To Remain Anonymous. As property guardians or artists in work/live residence at Balfron Tower, they have been privileged to its inner workings over three years. Their research is distinguished by its forensic nature, encompassing everything and nothing. From its historical beginnings as Rowlett Street, to the widely documented process of regeneration. From the internationally profiled artistic and cultural activities of recent years, to the overlooked traces and ephemera captured in common areas such as the north and south stairwells. Their research uses non-identical twin archives to investigate William Burroughs’ claim ‘Nothing Is True, Everything Is Permitted.'[2] In collaboration with art and intellectual property lawyers, they will consider the legal implications of these archives and their place within the discourse of architectural modernism in Britain. The aim of their research is the construction of unofficial storeys, in order to repeat the unrepeatable. They will determine who has the legal right to use the material and intellectual property associated with the archives and in which context. The aim of their research is the construction of unofficial storeys, in order to repeat the unrepeatable.

[1] Rahman, L. (2015) Statement on Balfron Tower. [Online] 1 April 2015. Available at: http://lutfurrahman.com/statement-balfron-tower/ [Accessed: 1 April 2015] Mayor at time of announcement subsequently removed from office due to electoral fraud.

[2]  Burroughs, W. (2010) Cities of the red night. London: Penguin.

Image: Children’s playground, Pepys Estate, Deptford, London, 1970s

The Research Hub and The Hydra

This year’s CCW first year research students exhibition is The Research Hub, a collective that will be held at the Cookhouse Gallery at Chelsea from 23-27 March.  There will be a series of events that engages with the multiple facets and diversities that range between the broad subject matters and modes of research as well as The Hydra publication. The gallery will be divided into four rooms; the Office, the practice presentation room, the function room and The Hydra display.

The cohort has taken inspiration from the original Hydra Magazine published in 1917. The original publication is from the Craiglockhart War Hospital, written by recovering soldiers to keep other patients and the community informed about the happenings around Craiglockhart.

Map by the first year cohort

Map by the first year cohort

In the true nature of research, there will be a draft publication of our version of The Hydra as a printed programme. The programme itself is a work in progress that will be added to and evolve during the week; it will reflect the events and contributions from speakers and other participants. This will be published after the event as the Cohort Hydra, Research Hub documentation.

The Office will be occupied by one or more current research students working on their research in situ, whatever form that may take- reading, writing, drawing, etc.

The Practice Presentation Room will host experimental work. An event will happen on Tuesday 24 March for which research students have been invited to give short, informal presentations on their work. Sharing the work is part of the research process, an evolution in itself, to ‘practice’ talking about complex ideas that often take the form of art work, film or theory. This opportunity is to build the research community within UAL and to give a platform for people to exchange and discover.

The Function Room will host different, led discussion and guest speakers. We hope to create an atmosphere conducive to informal social events that allows conversation to happen.

The Hydra itself is known as a mythical beast that had multiple heads. When one head was chopped off another would grow in it’s place. As a group we decided the best way to reflect our research community was to embrace the research process in common themes that effect our individual practices and the chaotic dynamic that happens while investigating a subject, concept or proposed theory. Much like a beast, uncertainty, surprising outcomes, risk and possible failure daunt the unbeaten path of such an undertaking as research. The students organising The Research Hub are Fangyu Cheng, Denise Clarke, Alice Evans, Robert Gadie, Penny Georgiou, Jennifer Murray, Stephanie Spindler, Maria Theodoraki and James Lander and those who wish to remain anonymous.

Covenant_blog_image

Practice Presentation collage by Stephanie Spindler

 

The full programme of events is as follows:

-Monday 23rdopen from 4pm onwards: Opening night drinks reception; Fangyu Cheng and Alice Evans will be giving a practice presentation called ‘Disobedient Objects’; Stephanie Spindler will also be presenting some new work; and the Office of Public Ritual will be performing a ritual.

-Tuesday 24th2 til 5pm: A selection of PhD students will be giving informal practice presentations, and leading discussion;

5pm onwards: UAL Senior Lecturer Dave Beech will be leading a talk.

Drinks reception following talk.

-Wednesday 25th6 til 8pm: James Lander will be presenting: SHOWREAL: moving images from the Balfron Tower/Rowlett Street Archives. This event will be hosted in the Lecture Theatre.

-Thursday 26th11 til 1pm: Dr. Stephen Wilson and the 1st year CCW PhD students will be chairing a discussion leading on from the series of lectures held at the ICA titled ‘Where Theory Belongs’;

3pm onwards: the Riotous Cities group J. Y’Barbo, L. Locke, K. Hye Lee, F. Peschier, M. Namazi, will be hosting a discussion about their Riotous Cities project, and their upcoming Art Riot project.

Drinks reception following discussion.

-Friday 27thOffice room and HYDRA room will be open.

 

Top image: Hydra doodle by Robert Gadie