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Call for Proposals/ Papers | Spectacular Evidence: Theatres of the Observed Mind

Spectacular Evidence: Theatres of the Observed Mind

Call for Proposals/ Papers

ABOUT SPECTACULAR EVIDENCE: THEATRES OF THE OBSERVED MIND

A one-day symposium, Spectacular Evidence will include presentations, performances, screenings and talks from the fields of visual art, medicine and critical theory.

Drawing upon histories of madness and its exhibition, and considering how it has been staged as cultural performance, this event will consider behaviours and ‘performances’ exchanged between viewer and physician in relation to patient.

Confirmed contributors to the event include:

  • Zoe Beloff, artist. Her exhibition The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society celebrated the centennial of Freud’s visit to Coney Island, by resurrecting the forgotten world of the Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society, along with the visionary ideas of its founder Albert Grass.
  • Dr Anna Harpin, author of ‘Performance, Madness and Psychiatry: Isolated Acts’ (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).
  • Dr Joanne Morra, Reader in Art History and Theory, CSM. Founder and principal editor, Journal of Visual Culture. Joanne Morra’s recent book, ‘Inside the Freud Museum’ is pending publication with IB Tauris.
  • Florence Peake, artist, dancer and performer, whose recent piece, Swell: The Thickening Surface Of, explored the gap between inner and outer as a tension between inanimate, figurative carapaces, and imagined interior lives being voiced
  • Dr Michelle Williams Gamaker, artist, filmmaker and collaborator with Mieke Bal on the feature film A Long History of Madness (2011)

The symposium will take place at ArtsAdmin, Toynbee Studios, London, on 24 March 2017.

Spectacular Evidence: Theatres of the Observed Mind is convened by Dr Zoë Mendelson and presented by Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme in association with ArtsAdmin.

PROPOSALS

Contributions are welcome from across disciplines with a connection to the subject area covered by the symposium.

We welcome proposals for traditional presentations by speakers and performative contributions / variations on the lecture form.

Your proposal/presentation should be no more than 20 minutes in duration

The deadline for applications is 5 pm on January 10th 2017

For more information, please contact Zoë Mendelson at [email protected]

SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL HERE: http://bit.ly/2hIpIXe

 

 

 

 

 

Art Riot

Art Riot calls on artists and art students to bring or perform an artwork on Saturday at 20 June at the Bank of England in a gathering and marching of a multitude of artworks as part of End Austerity Now. People are invited to bring any kind of portable, wearable or performable art work to accompany yourself as artwork at the riot.

Rather than necessarily creating unified slogans or banners in articulated protest, this is a performative platform that brings art out of the studio and onto the streets to create an alternative, unmediated engagement with a moving, public space that is equally unharmonious.

The project rejects and operates outside of the limitations imposed on the role of art and the artist by an Austerity government that sees our value in terms of economics – from art as a commodity, to our ability to enhance London property value, to our tuition fee value 5 years on from the 2010 student protests. The End Austerity route will march from Bank to Parliament Square, but we will continue on to Millbank Tower, retracing the failed 2010 student protest.

Art Riot is created by Chelsea College of Arts PhD students Lana Locke, Joshua Y’Barbo and Keun Hye Lee and we will be putting together a publication to follow the event – to which you are also invited to submit artwork or text.

Art Riot will meet at 12pm on 20 June at the corner of Bucklersbury and Walbrook (close to the Bank of England / Bank tube station).

Launch of Theatre and Performance Design

CCW Professor Jane Collins, Professor Arnold Aronson of Columbia University and Routledge will launch the new journal Theatre and Performance Design, devoted to the study of scenography, on 22 June at the Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space, PQ 2015. Theatre & Performance Design is a quarterly journal publishing in March, June, October and December.

In their introduction to the journal Aronson and Collins explain why this new publication is so timely. ‘In the past, discussion pertaining to design and production has been hampered by the fact that it was spread across a range of different publications where debates were often subsumed by other aspects of practice. As a result the field has been denied the opportunity to engage with other related areas at the appropriate level, and the critical edge in debate has often been diffused. Further complicating the effort, a de facto firewall was seemingly erected between practice and theory. We hope that with the publication of Theatre and Performance Design, there will be a true conversation, and that researchers, teachers, students and practitioners will now have a dedicated journal that will facilitate rapid and informed response to current, ongoing and emerging concerns, thereby stimulating further enquiry and providing a strong base from which theatre and performance design and scenography can confidently engage with other discourse on its own terms. We hope that this journal will not only make a contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the field but crucially shape how that knowledge is produced.

We wanted this first double issue to address the state of the art in theatre design and scenography internationally and explore the challenges and questions the field faces in the twenty-first century. In the call for papers we suggested that we are currently undergoing a significant “turn” towards scenography, both as a critical framework and as an expansion of practice across a broad range of theatre- and performance-related activities.

What is a “turn”? The Oxford English Dictionary lists more than 40 definitions for the noun “turn” and another 28 for the verb. None cites the academic usage, but a few definitions seem relevant: “change of direction or course”; “the action, or an act, of turning or changing; change, alteration, modification”; “The point at which one named period of time gives way to the next; the beginning or end of a named period of time, regarded in relation to the transition point between it and the preceding or following period”. One definition stood out as particularly apt: “The time for action or proceeding of any kind which comes round to each individual of a series in succession; (each or any one’s) recurring occasion of action, etc. in a series of acts done, or to be done, by (or to) a number in rotation”. This, of course, is the definition embodied in the song “Rose’s Turn” from the landmark musical Gypsy: “Starting now it’s gonna be my turn”. So not only do we believe that theatre and performance studies are altering their direction, moving into a new period, but also that within those fields and beyond it is time for scenography to take centre stage. It’s our turn.’

The online version of the journal is now available from Taylor & Francis Online.

Strange Attraction

Dear A, I’m attracted to you, and I don’t know why.

            Shall we be friends?

Artworks can write letters too, inasmuch as they reach out, make lines of contact with other artists, and forge an aesthetic of correspondence. In Strange Attraction, a group exhibition of six artists working in a variety of media at APT Gallery, curated by Emily Purser, that correspondence is curated and archived, as the works speak to one another through their shared preoccupations. Sometimes the works’ closeness can be found in the processes in which they have been made, or the materials that have been manipulated, and sometimes it is found in the works’ ideas, its postscripts and its messages.

Many of the artists gathered here are interested in biography, not as a mapped out narrative, but as an affective pool: a script to be rewritten and performed, as pliable as paper. And even when the life is not visible in the works’ imagery, it exists in the frenetic states of matter and experience that the work has endured.

The abject body is a marginal unclean thing, potentially transgressive in its borderline subversiveness. In Lana Locke’s work, the sculptor references this body, but fragments it, creating sculptural installations that suggest, or indeed perform, a loose and perverse corporeality. Heads float. Limbs are scattered about like twigs on the ground. Bloody sheets fall from flowers on plinths. Locke returns to APT Gallery having previously exhibited there in the Creekside Open 2013, where she won Paul Noble’s Selector’s Prize. Her works in Strange Attraction include the pictured sculpture, Bridal Piece III (2014). Locke says, ‘I am thrilled to return to APT Gallery to be part of this beautiful exhibition curated by Emily Purser. My own work in the show is very personal, and it is clear that all the artists have very different approaches. Yet as you walk around the exhibition, many subtle, organic underlying threads emerge between the artworks of the group and they seem to speak to each other. It is a haunting, strangely uplifting exhibition that I am proud to be a part of.’

This mode of identity performance is similarly found in Lady Lucy’s paintings, which draw on documentary and interview research, to create portraits of layered and collaged material, often incorporating art historical gestures and tropes. Defiantly appropriated, the self is rendered a composite artificial object.

Andrew Mania makes art akin to the obsessive habits of a collector, transcribing people and objects. In his work, the autobiographical is recast in small, coloured pencil drawings, and even smaller paintings: a public re-reading of the intimate. The blue eyes of a young boy gaze out from the canvas, affective and abject: it is a look of innocence, melancholy, desire and love.

In Vanessa Mitter’s paintings, the personal is also treated as a pliant material, a source of affect and investigation, but also of fiction and performance. Collage, paint and pigment find a way on to the canvas in ephemeral expressive gestures. There is an abject narrative at play – of lost childhood and drifting brides – but it is a narrative that wanders in and around the artifice of the material.

In Hannah Campion’s work, painting is made into a happening, and then an installation, as her worked on canvases are then reworked into ambiguous three-dimensional forms, which are strewn on the floor or pinned to the wall. The paper or canvas undergoes all kind of processes: it is crushed, trampled, nailed, repaired, collaged. It is an active, performative mode of painting, which is also a site-specific response to the surrounding space.

Eleanor Moreton is similarly interested in painting as performance. In her work, narrative is not so much read as experienced. She provides the protagonist and the prop, often drawing on her own personal histories; but with the medium and its application (part abstract, part figurative), comes an ambiguous appropriation of the primary material. As in the work of the other five artists, the raw is remoulded as an artistic event.

In Strange Attraction, the viewer will find six distinct but correspondent practices, whereby narratives relating to the bodily and the biographical are re-made in painting, sculpture and installation. In these intimate objects, the personal evades our grasp when the performance takes over.

The exhibition is at A.P.T Gallery, 20th March – 5 th April 2015, with a private view on 19th March, 6.30pm to 8.30pm. Curator’s panel discussion and SLAM (South London Art Map) last Fridays opening 27th March, 6.30pm to 8.30pm.

Gallery Opening Hours: 12.00-5.00pm, Thursday to Sunday