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Call for Papers | MIRAJ | Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Moving Image Review & Art Journal | Issue 7:2

Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Call for Papers | Deadline: 1 March 2017

This issue will be guest edited by Rashmi Sawhney and Lucia King.

The uncontestably global ecologies of contemporary moving image art have invited some deliberation on questions of regional aesthetics, identity, circulation and transnationalism. Yet such discussions have mainly taken place in the context of exhibiting ‘non-western’ art in the western world. Contradictions still persist in the project of destabilizing assumed hierarchies within the Euro-American art world (in the most recent Documenta XI and Venice Biennale, for example) whilst artists of the global South gain currency primarily by meeting the expectations of ‘western’ art markets. Furthermore, Euro-American art historical discourse remains negligent of film and video art’s legacies from the South, including experimental film and screen-based arts. As a consequence, moving image art by ‘non-western’ artists is either caged into essentialist frameworks founded on mythical notions of ‘authenticity’, or stirred into the melting pot of contemporary art without due attention to their particular cultural and aesthetic contexts. This MIRAJ issue, therefore, engages with the particularities of film and video art practices from South Asia, and leverages these in theorising the relationship between regional, global and transnational moving image cultures.

To address some of these gaps in scholarship, this special edition of MIRAJ focuses on the circuits of production, exhibition and authoring of South Asian artists moving image in order to chart key theoretical terrains of ‘regional’ practices in a global context. We solicit articles from artists, critics and curators who work within and outside South Asia, that highlight conceptual frameworks and offer insights on the multi-layered relationships between ‘home and the world’, region and identity, aesthetics and translatability, cultural specificities and contexts of classification/consumption/circulation. We invite articles that build upon foundational work in South Asian moving image art and film histories as well as transnational art practices and aesthetics.

We are particularly interested in articles that address the following:

• Theories of film and video art outside of the ‘national’ framework that are attentive to influences, collaborations and exchanges across geographic and political regions.
• Examples of significant regional exchanges and collaborations between artists and filmmakers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
• The relationship between region, identity and moving image practice in South Asia.
• The aesthetic pre-cursors (in a pre-cinematic sense) that influence contemporary moving image art in the region, including investigations of artist(s)’ methodologies.
• Experiments in film and video art that emphasise ‘indigenous forms’.
• Transnational curatorial practices that work with and around the regional/national framework.
• Historicising South Asian moving image art in the post-medium context.
• Spectatorship and post medium/ multi-media art in/from South Asia.
• South Asian artists’ moving image engagement with science, political activism, environmentalism, urbanism etc.
• South Asian artists’ moving image hybridity with alternate media genres, such as experimental film, documentary, and digital media.
• Digital media and the exhibition and distribution of ‘regional’ moving image art.
• Digital archives and curatorial practices in/about South Asian film & video art.

We publish the following types of writing: scholarly articles (5000-7000 words); opinion pieces, feature articles and interviews (3000-5000 words); review essays of books, individual works, exhibitions and events (3000-5000 words). Scholarly articles will be blind peer-reviewed and feature articles and review essays can be peer-reviewed on request. Articles submitted to MIRAJ should be original and not under consideration by any other publication, including online publications. We do not publish articles by artists about their own work, nor reviews by curators or venues about their own exhibitions.

Please submit completed manuscripts only.
Send all contributions by e-mail in Word format to the Editorial Assistant: [email protected].

Deadline for completed articles: 1 March 2017
Image: Prisms of perception, (2010) Artist: Gigi Scaria. Medium: Video installation. (Image courtesy of the artist).

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 13 – Spring 2017

Journal for Artistic Research

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 13 – Spring 2017

The deadline for consideration is 20 November 2016

JAR publishes artistic research from all arts disciplines, with or without academic affiliation, and includes the work of artistic research practitioners and theorists. Rethinking the traditional journal format, JAR offers its contributors a free-to-use online space called the Research Catalogue (RC) where text can be woven together with image, audio and video material. Developed over the last five years, the RC’s functionality is continually being updated to better display research practice in a manner that respects artists’ modes of presentation, while incorporating web-enabled possibilities for collaboration, debate and discussion. JAR promotes experimental approaches to the ‘writing up’ of research and provides a unique ‘reading’ experience, while carefully fulfilling the expectations of a peer-reviewed academic journal.

While JAR’s remit is broad, the Journal is specifically interested in contributions that reflect upon and expose artistic practice as research, and welcomes submissions from artists interested in exchanging ideas and opening up the processes and methodologies that underlie their practice.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account and use the online writing space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit: http://www.jar-online.net/index.php/pages/view/123

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, Phoebe Stubbs, at [email protected]
JAR works with an international editorial board and a large panel of peer-reviewers.

Editor in Chief: Michael Schwab

Editorial Board: Annette Arlander, Sher Doruff, Barnaby Drabble, Mika Elo, Leonella Grasso Caprioli, Yara Guasque, Julian Klein, Jen Liese, Isidro López-Aparicio and Mareli Stolp.

JAR is published by the Society for Artistic Research (SAR), an independent, non-profit association. You can support JAR by becoming an individual or institutional member of SAR. More information can be found here. For updates on our activities, join our mailing list.
Contact: http://www.jar-online.net/

Theatre & Performance Design – Call for Submissions

Volume 3, Issues 1&2: Drawing & Design

The editors, Arnold Aronson and Jane Collins have pleasure in calling for submissions to the journal Theatre and Performance Design Volume 3, Issues 1&2 spring and summer 2017. The volume will consist of general articles on scenography but we are also interested in receiving articles that address the specific theme of Drawing and Design.                                             

 ‘Drawing… is at once medium and process, performative act and idea, it is sign, symbol and diagram. It is a space of negotiation for both established meanings and what is yet to be known, defined and articulated. It is a medium for analysis, for the acquisition and facilitation of understanding. It is observational tool and recording practice.’ Flavia Loscialpo[1]

There is a substantial canon of writing about drawing in fine art but relatively little on drawing in theatre and performance.  In the 2017 spring and summer issues of the journal we are keen to explore how drawing works across the full range of scenographic practices.  As a means of making ideas concrete and as a discursive tool drawing is instrumental in theatre, costume and performance design, spatial design and architecture. Articles might consider; how precisely does drawing work as ‘a space of negotiation’ in these practices? What kind of drawings do designers make and how are they evaluated? In a recent edition of the journal David Bisaha, with reference to the New Stagecraft movement early in the last century, has argued that ‘‘Renderings’ depiction of composed dramatic moments afforded designers greater control and autonomy over the completed stage picture…’’ [2]  What is the status of drawing as scenographic artefact and process in contemporary theatre and performance practice? As work has moved beyond theatre buildings and into diverse sites, both urban and rural, have performance scores and maps replaced ground plans and renderings? What materials and tools, including the digital, do designers use to draw? What kind of drawings do sound and lighting designers make? How might a close analysis of the drawings of designers from the past help us to understand the visual culture and the professional context in which they were made?  Can a close study of different approaches to drawing help us to understand the evolving role of the designer?

We welcome articles on drawing of between 5000-8000 words. Contributions from practitioners talking about their own use of drawing, articles on CAD and its applications as well as visual essays that explore the currency of drawing as design practice past, present and future.  In addition we continue to encourage submissions on issues relating to scenography in general.

Submissions to Nick Tatchell, Editorial Assistant: [email protected]   

Deadline: October 31st 2016

[1] Drawing and The Body, Exhibition Catalogue KG52 Gallery, Kammakargatan 52, Stockholm, 18April -14 May 2011published by The Swedish School of Textiles, University of Boras and London College of Fashion, University of the Arts, London.

[2] Bisaha, David. 2015. Robert Edmund Jones’ scenic rendering as design artefact and professional tool. Theatre and Performance Design 1 (3): 220-235 (p.220)