Paul Coldwell in conversation with Christopher Le Brun

Professor Paul Coldwell will be in conversation with the Artist & President of the Royal Academy of Arts, Christopher Le Brun.

Book Tickets

Christopher Le Brun is a painter, sculptor and printmaker, an alumni of Chelsea College of Art and the current President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This conversation will primarily focus on his work in print, the discipline for which he was originally elected to the Royal Academy. His work as a printmaker has been rich and varied, ranging in scale and process from large mural scale monotypes made with Garner and Richard Tullis in Santa Barbara, through to small scale intimate etchings published by Paragon Press with whom he has had a long association. Le Brun’s prints are generally the result of a dedicated period of engagement resulting in series and portfolios of work which explore themes and ideas current in his paintings and sculptures. Notable publications include Seven Lithographs 1989, 50 Etchings 1990, Four Riders 1993, Wagner 1994, Motif Light 1998, Paris Lithographs 2000, Fifty Etchings 2005 and the newly released Seria Ludo woodcuts in 2015.

Paul Coldwell is an artist and Professor in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts. He has written extensively on printmaking, is on the editorial board of the journal Print Quarterly and is a regular contributor to Art in Print for whom he writes regularly. He has curated a number of exhibitions including Morandi’s legacy: Influences on British Art (which included Le Brun) and more recently, The artists’ Folio as a site of Inquiry.

This event is organised by Chelsea College of Arts in partnership with Print Quarterly.

Book Tickets

Jessica Ogden: Still

31-33 Church St, London NW8 8ES

26 May – 23 June 2017 (11.00 – 18.00 Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Private View: Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.00 – 20.00 (RSVP to [email protected])

May 2017 sees the opening of an exhibition by Jessica Ogden in London. Entitled Still, it acts as an exploration of Jessica’s work through the static display of archive and current works, alongside a series of workshops. Church Street, Marylebone plays host to the experience, which was born out of a long running conversation between Jessica and Professor Carol Tulloch, writer and curator at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL, who will curate the exhibition. The space is designed by Professor Judith Clark, a London-based curator, who collaborated closely with Jessica.

Born and raised in Jamaica, Jessica began her career in fashion reusing the old to create the new. In 1992, after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Byam Shaw School of Art, she joined Oxfam’s NoLoGo project. Working with donated clothes, Jessica found herself at the forefront of what was then termed customising. The following year Ogden launched her own label using traditional stitching, hand printing and layering techniques and often appropriating old garments such as quilts. Soon after the label’s launch, Ogden staged catwalk shows and presentations as part of London Fashion Week from 1996-2006. Her work continued with cult French label A.P.C., with whom after moving to Paris, she deepened her work to include a line of quilts made from archive A.P.C. fabrics, another example of her continuing obsession with repurposing in fashion.

In 2016 Jessica made the decision to return to live in Jamaica, taking over the running of Harmony Hall, her mother’s gallery which champions local Jamaican art, alongside continuing her fashion projects. Perhaps it was this move that offered Jessica the perspective to look back on her journey thus far. A large theme running through all of Jessica’s work is story telling. In the same way, the exhibition will act as an autobiographical study through the selection and display of pivotal work. Alongside this, Jessica will hold free workshops for the visitors to the exhibition, which in themselves will provide insight and inspiration into her unique practice. Workshops will include free hemming and customisation, amongst other activities. Three workshops will be led by Ogden and places are limited.

To illustrate and further explain the exhibition Jessica and Carol have worked on a publication with accompanying imagery by Syd Shelton and text by Tamsin Blanchard.

Jessica Ogden: Still has been curated by Professor Carol Tulloch and is a Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School project.

Press enquiries: [email protected] | Exhibition or workshop enquiries: [email protected]

 

Painting: Atoms and Speech Bubbles

23 May 2017 | 6:30 pm | Studio | Tickets £3.00 to £5.00 Book Online

In this panel discussion, chaired by artist and writer Zara Worth, artists Jeffrey Dennis, Kimathi Donkor and Fay Nicolson will discuss their practices in relation to the expanded field of contemporary painting.

Each artist will speak about their individual reference points, as well as how their work negotiates between a kind of surface strategy of collage or appropriation of snapshots, magazine images and other windows onto popular culture and the everyday, and a contemplation on scale of the human in relation to his or her political, historical and molecular context.

The same evening will see the launch of Jeffrey Dennis’s new publication Ringbinder, a monograph based on his solo exhibition at Northern Gallery of Contemporary Art in 2015.  Edited by Andrew Hunt and George Vasey, designed by James Langdon, the book includes essays by Sue Hubbard, Sunil Manghani and Dan Smith, an interview with the artist, and the thoughts of artists, writers, curators and gallery directors including Stephen Bury, Jeffery Camp, Nigel Cooke, Dan Coombs, Penelope Curtis, Dexter Dalwood, Stephen Farthing, Catherine Ferguson, Rebecca Fortnum, Ian Giles, Martin Holman, Timothy Hyman, Elizabeth Magill, Jo Melvin, Eleanor Moreton, Lynda Morris, Andrew Nairne, Mathew Sawyer, Barry Schwabsky, Nicholas Serota, Donald Smith, Damian Taylor, Rob Tufnell, Virginia Verran, Emrys Williams and Sam Windett.

Image: Jeffrey Dennis, The Flowers that Came Again (detail), 2012. 122 x 148 cm, oil & charcoal on linen.

This Has NOT Been Cancelled

John Latham audio/visuals & conversations

2 May 5.30-8pm, Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts

 

A rare lecture recording and films by John Latham form the starting point for three conversations around the themes Not Knowing, Flat Time (House), and the Artist Placement Group/the artist as Incidental Person by invited artists, writers and curators including Gill Addison, Gareth Bell-Jones, Paul Clinton, Katherine Jackson, William Kherbek and Jo Melvin.

<< All welcome, no need to book! >>

Gill Addison is an artist and academic based in London. Her recent projects negotiated ‘how’ and ‘where’ research manifest as an activity, event, and material within artist film and video practices and histories.

Gareth Bell-Jones is a curator and writer, currently curator/director of Flat Time House. From 2010-14 he was a curator at Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge and a regular visiting tutor to the RCA, Curating Contemporary Art Department.

Paul Clinton is a writer based in London. He is associate editor of frieze and Frieze Masters Magazine. In 2015 he co-curated the exhibition ‘duh? Art & Stupidity’ at Focal Point Gallery, Southend-on-Sea.

Katherine Jackson is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia and currently a visiting researcher at the Slade School of Fine Art. Her dissertation research focuses on the Artist Placement Group and John Latham in 1970s UK. She has worked as Flat Time House’s archive and research specialist since 2015.

William Kherbek is the writer of the novels Ecology of Secrets and ULTRALIFE (Arcadia Missa, 2013/2016) and the epic poem, Pull Factor (2016). The video-poem collection Ephemera was posted work by work to Youtube in 2014. His essay “Technofeudalism and the Tragedy of the Commons” (2016) appeared in the first issue of Doggerland’s journal, and he has contributed essays to the “Intersubjectivity” series from Sternberg Press.

Jo Melvin is a Reader in Fine Art, Archives and Special Collections at Chelsea College of Arts; a curator of projects including an ongoing collaboration with the performance collective JocJonJosh, ‘Five Issues of Studio International’ at Raven Row; and a writer of essays including “The Xerox Book” for Paula Cooper Gallery (New York) and “British Art and Conceptualism 1966-1979” for Tate Britain.

Emma Gradin is an independent curator and research student at Chelsea College of Arts developing and deploying curatorial strategies founded on extended states of not-knowing and creative suspension in the current context of time-shortness and accelerated productivity/consumption.

This Has NOT Been Cancelled was made possible by the UAL: Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Student Initiative Fund.

Chelsea College of Arts Banqueting Hall, Tuesday 2 May 5.30-8pm

First Food Residency – Chelsea College of Arts, UAL

July 3rd to August 21st 2017
Deadline for submission of proposals 10am, 17th April 2017
The First Food Residency 2017 invites proposals from MA students, PhD
candidates or Alumni of Chelsea College of Arts, UAL. Two Artists will be selected
to take part in a creative research residency in Oaxaca, Mexico, culminating in a
group exhibition.
Research should be based around material relevant to sustainability (particularly in
the production of food and craft) in Mexico. Inspiration can be taken loosely from a
broad range of subjects such as social history, the future of GM and mono crop
systems, branding, foods that are unfamiliar in the UK but indigenous to Mexico,
e.g. Cactus/Maize etc. A suggested focus for this year will be around cacti and in
particular
‘Nopal’ and its inherent relationship with the cochineal beetle. For ideas and
examples of the kind of work that has been done before, please see the link to
previous exhibitions at www.firstfoodresidency.com or the Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/ firstfoodresidency/
This residency offers studio space with the University of Oaxaca, UABJO
(Universidad Autonoma Benito Juarez de Oaxaca), who will also host a final
exhibition.
During their stay in Mexico, the student will have the opportunity to access facilities
through UABJO for technical support, and additional assistance through First Food
for research and practical information.
Specific research is supported by First Foods who will help achieve the ambition of
a successful individual proposal. Trips are organised to villages that are known for
specialist craft activities, a cochineal farm, Mescal distilleries and areas of
agricultural interest, to meet farmers and growers. The residency has a relationship
with Puente de la Salud, a respected charity who specialise in the promotion of
Amaranth.
Co – founders of the project, Anna and Antonia Bruce will oversee the residency
alongside previous First Food residents who will be engaged to support the artists
in residence for research and social activities. There will be regular documentation
of the work produced as a record of activities.
APPLICATION GUIDELINES
This residency in Mexico is open to all interpretations. However, there must be a
visual expression to the completed work that can be included in a ‘pop up’
exhibition at the end of the residency, and be called upon for future exhibitions with
the First Food Residency.
Proposals must be sent as PDFs to the following address by 10am on the 17th
April 2017: [email protected]
In the proposal the following information should be included:
⁃ Name
⁃ Age
⁃ Address
⁃ A recent photograph
⁃ CV
⁃ Biography (100 to 200 words)
⁃ Details of exhibitions and / or artistic works published
⁃ Three examples of works, including images, date of completion and dimensions.
⁃ In case of a performance artist, please include links to pictures or videos.
⁃ Objectives and creative intent (300-500 words)
⁃ A work schedule, describing in detail how you will use the time to carry the
investigation and completion of the work.
⁃ description of the type of space required to work and the necessary materials. ⁃
Description of other requests for funding (if any)
⁃ A letter of recommendation from an art institution or a recognised artist, which can
be both UK or Mexico.
⁃ Spanish level: Advanced / Intermediate / Basic / Non-existent
With the support of UABJO, First Food Residency is able to offer workspace
and facilitation of research. Chelsea, UAL will organise flights and provide a
stipend for the stay.
For more information contact us on email: [email protected]
During their stay in Mexico, the artists in residence will have the opportunity to
access facilities through UABJO, technical support and additional facilitation
through First Food to source materials and contacts outside of UABJO.
Facilities include sculpture and printing workshops, photography and digital
workshops. For textile students, relationships have been built with the weaving
villages who can offer access to looms and help with materials. The residency
also offers communication with and visits to farms through local charity Puente de
la Salud.

Sigune Hamann | Heimlich and Freshers (Re-lation) @ Ashmolean

Heimlich and Freshers (Re-lation)

Photographic installations by Sigune Hamann Free display, Gallery 51

Throughout the week, photographic work by artist Sigune Hamann, Reader in Art and Media Practice at the University of the Arts, London will be on display in the Museum. In Gallery 51 on the second floor, her series of landscape photographs ‘Heimlich’ hangs alongside the Ashmolean’s collection of small oil landscapes. On the Chantrey Stairs, between the ground floor and the second floor, are images from her current collaboration with the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, ‘Freshers (Re-lation)’.

Wednesday 15 March

Looking and perceiving in the Ashmolean With Sigune Hamann, artist 11am – 1pm, meet in Gallery 21 at 10.50am Artist Sigune Hamann leads a walking conversation through the Ashmolean’s paintings collection and her own photographic work, temporarily installed in the galleries, addressing questions of how and what we see, and the ways in which our perception of images can be transformed according to how we look at them. This event is limited to 12 participants. Booking essential. https://tickets.ox.ac.uk/WebStore/shop/ViewItems.aspx?CG=ash&C=SpecEvents

other way round

other way round

7 – 9 March | Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Arts

an exhibition by new PhD Students

other way round can mean many things: is it that we have gone the wrong way and should recalculate our itinerary? Or that we are on our way to totally uncharted territory? In this case, we are attempting to make visible diverse approaches to practice-based research. This 1st year PhD students’ exhibition brings together samples of research practice from very different fields, and tries to grow conversations from them. Spanning over fine arts, design and curating, the confrontation of this diverse work in one common space aims to create meaning from these impromptu interactions. By crystallising our ongoing practice at an arbitrary moment in
the PhD journey, we hope to offer a view of the research process and learn from it, as much as we hope to provide food for thought.

Event Programme

Tuesday 7th March 

12-6pm

Neil Farnan

Monopoly to Utopoly – a utopian exchange
The board game Monopoly encapsulates key features
of our economy and celebrates some of its worst
aspects.
This ubiquitous game normalises socially useless
rentier behaviour, although the intention of the original
version was to do the opposite.
Join us in evaluating this particular economic
model and engage with new values, properties and
currencies to design a more utopian economy.
Or pop in later to have fun playing the redesigned
Utopoly game.

Wednesday 8th March

12-3pm
Ana Teles
Copying, transcribing, mimicking, repeating
artists’ paintings
During the period of the exhibition, Ana T. will be
engaging in conversations with artists negotiating her
approach to the copying of their work.

4-6pm
Emma Gradin
Slow Work
What is time? What is worth taking time over? An open
conversation with a group of people including artists,
activists, anthropologists.

Thursday 9th March

12-3pm
Laetitia Forst
Textiles for Disassembly
Design for disassembly exists in everyday products
so as to allow for easy recycling. The visitors are
invited to reflect on how it can be applied to their own
consumption habits and influence their perception of
materials.

3-6pm
Timothy Smith
Sound/Memory/Landscape
An audiovisual dialogue.

6-8pm
Closing reception

All exhibits will be on display 7-9th March 12-6pm. If you wish to attend scheduled events, please refer to this programme.

 

Call for Papers – Robot Futures: Vision and Touch in Robotics symposium

 

This one-day symposium, to take place at the Science Museum, London, on 8th July 2017, will bring together engineers, scientists, cultural theorists and artists to explore notions of embodiment and telepresence in the field of robotics and in virtual and augmented realities.

Humans are embodied in robotic explorers; endowing them with ‘eyes and hands’ robots are able to relate perceptions and experiences of places and objects physically unavailable to us. Although such robots might not ‘look’ human, it is the desire to see stereoscopically, and to feel through all the senses that grant robots anthropomorphic qualities; we see and feel through the robot. In this way robots enable a more embodied experience, which is nonetheless mediated. The development of virtual reality technologies is increasingly enabling us to see and feel as the robot in order to get closer to a more immersive experience.

We invite established and emerging researchers to submit abstracts for paper presentations that address notions of embodiment, telepresence, vision and touch specifically regarding robotics and virtual and augmented realities. We welcome proposals from the arts & humanities and the sciences, particularly from researchers whose work spans both fields.

Please email Luci Eldridge and Nina Trivedi at [email protected] with paper proposals, of 500 words max, by 9pm on Friday 3rd March 2017. Please include a one-page CV with your paper proposal. Feel free to email us with any questions.

Deadline for submissions – Friday 3rd March 2017

Email: [email protected]

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Mexico City, June 18-20, 2017

Re-posted from Toynbee Prize Foundation

For readers interested in the international dimensions of fascism, here’s an exciting (and topical) call for applications for an interdisciplinary workshop  to be held at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Mexico City:

Paper proposals for this workshop on the international dimensions of fascism are warmly invited from scholars, artists and activists working in and across the fields of international law, history, history of art, international relations, postcolonial studies, sociology, anthropology, political theory, geography, feminist studies, queer theory and critical race theory.

In light of the recent and very rapid re-centering of fascist discourse and iconography across the world, the workshop aims to take fascism and its concept of the international seriously as distinctive, perhaps even inevitable consequences of the unification of ‘the world’ as such since 1492.

While the workshop leans towards the field of international law, its character is strongly interdisciplinary. Interventions (including textual, visual and aural interventions) from individuals and groups working in all disciplines are welcome.

We are delighted to say that the workshop is being hosted by the Museo de Arte Moderno (MAM) in Mexico City. The MAM, itself a landmark in modernist architecture, is home to one of the most important collections of anti-fascist art in Latin America. An introduction to and tour of this collection will be included in the workshop’s activities.

The topics we expect to be investigating include (but are by no means limited to):
** The international dimensions of neo-fascist groups like Golden Dawn and the ‘Alt-Right’, together with their historical connections to(and disconnections from) inter-war fascist movements;
** The innovations made by fascist international lawyers and theorists of the international in the1920s and 1930s in Italy, Japan, France, Germany, Argentina and elsewhere;
** The relationship between decolonisation, fascism and anti-colonial theory in Indonesia,Martinique, Ethiopia and elsewhere in the Third World;
** The political economy of fascism;
** The influence of fascist ideas and practices on post-War dictatorships, both in the Third World and in the West;
** The fascist and anti-fascist history of everyday concepts such as environmentalism,motherhood, freedom, space and accumulation;
** The relationship between fascism/anti-fascism and Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and other art movements both during the inter-war period and today.

Abstracts should be sent to the workshop’s organiser, Rose Sydney Parfitt (Melbourne Law School/Kent Law School), at [email protected] no later than 1 March 2017. The organizers of the conference note that spaces are “very limited,” so apply soon! For more information, see the workshop Facebook page.

Call for Papers | MIRAJ | Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Moving Image Review & Art Journal | Issue 7:2

Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Call for Papers | Deadline: 1 March 2017

This issue will be guest edited by Rashmi Sawhney and Lucia King.

The uncontestably global ecologies of contemporary moving image art have invited some deliberation on questions of regional aesthetics, identity, circulation and transnationalism. Yet such discussions have mainly taken place in the context of exhibiting ‘non-western’ art in the western world. Contradictions still persist in the project of destabilizing assumed hierarchies within the Euro-American art world (in the most recent Documenta XI and Venice Biennale, for example) whilst artists of the global South gain currency primarily by meeting the expectations of ‘western’ art markets. Furthermore, Euro-American art historical discourse remains negligent of film and video art’s legacies from the South, including experimental film and screen-based arts. As a consequence, moving image art by ‘non-western’ artists is either caged into essentialist frameworks founded on mythical notions of ‘authenticity’, or stirred into the melting pot of contemporary art without due attention to their particular cultural and aesthetic contexts. This MIRAJ issue, therefore, engages with the particularities of film and video art practices from South Asia, and leverages these in theorising the relationship between regional, global and transnational moving image cultures.

To address some of these gaps in scholarship, this special edition of MIRAJ focuses on the circuits of production, exhibition and authoring of South Asian artists moving image in order to chart key theoretical terrains of ‘regional’ practices in a global context. We solicit articles from artists, critics and curators who work within and outside South Asia, that highlight conceptual frameworks and offer insights on the multi-layered relationships between ‘home and the world’, region and identity, aesthetics and translatability, cultural specificities and contexts of classification/consumption/circulation. We invite articles that build upon foundational work in South Asian moving image art and film histories as well as transnational art practices and aesthetics.

We are particularly interested in articles that address the following:

• Theories of film and video art outside of the ‘national’ framework that are attentive to influences, collaborations and exchanges across geographic and political regions.
• Examples of significant regional exchanges and collaborations between artists and filmmakers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
• The relationship between region, identity and moving image practice in South Asia.
• The aesthetic pre-cursors (in a pre-cinematic sense) that influence contemporary moving image art in the region, including investigations of artist(s)’ methodologies.
• Experiments in film and video art that emphasise ‘indigenous forms’.
• Transnational curatorial practices that work with and around the regional/national framework.
• Historicising South Asian moving image art in the post-medium context.
• Spectatorship and post medium/ multi-media art in/from South Asia.
• South Asian artists’ moving image engagement with science, political activism, environmentalism, urbanism etc.
• South Asian artists’ moving image hybridity with alternate media genres, such as experimental film, documentary, and digital media.
• Digital media and the exhibition and distribution of ‘regional’ moving image art.
• Digital archives and curatorial practices in/about South Asian film & video art.

We publish the following types of writing: scholarly articles (5000-7000 words); opinion pieces, feature articles and interviews (3000-5000 words); review essays of books, individual works, exhibitions and events (3000-5000 words). Scholarly articles will be blind peer-reviewed and feature articles and review essays can be peer-reviewed on request. Articles submitted to MIRAJ should be original and not under consideration by any other publication, including online publications. We do not publish articles by artists about their own work, nor reviews by curators or venues about their own exhibitions.

Please submit completed manuscripts only.
Send all contributions by e-mail in Word format to the Editorial Assistant: [email protected].

Deadline for completed articles: 1 March 2017
Image: Prisms of perception, (2010) Artist: Gigi Scaria. Medium: Video installation. (Image courtesy of the artist).