Category Archives: Uncategorized

RECONCILIATIONS

1 November –  1 December  2018
The Exchange, Bush House Liddell Hart Cabinets
King’s College London London WC2R
The Knapp Gallery
Regent’s University London London NW1

Professor Paul Coldwell (CCW, UAL) will be showing his work in this fascinating exhibition around reconciliation hosted by King’s College London.

Exhibition openings and receptions: Thursday 1 November, 19.00-21.00 The Exchange, Bush House King’s College London

Friday 2nd November, 17.00-19.00 The Knapp Gallery,

Regent’s University London

Art and Reconciliation Symposium: Thursday 29 November – Saturday 1 December 2018,
King’s College London.

For further details and to register: www.artreconciliation.org 

Symposium: Women in Conceptual Art

 

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts
9.30-7pm, Thursday 24 May 2018

The Women in Conceptual Art symposium will present new research in performance, scores, film and happenings emerging from female artists’ conceptual art practices. Artists’ work to be addressed will be drawn from but not limited to the following: Christine Kozlov, Eleanor Antin, Lee Lozano, Deborah Hay, Dorothea Rockburne, Hanne Darboven, Ann Hamilton, Pip Benveniste, Carlyle Reedy, Marie Yates, Annabelle Nicolson and Anne Bean.

Speakers:
– A K Dolven
– Kaitlin Doyle
– Karen Di Franco
– Sophia Hao
– Lina Hermsdorf
– Rozemin Keshvani
– Irene Revell
– Amy Tobin
– Catherine Wood

Tickets: £8/6 (includes lunch and post-event drinks)
Book your place here: http://bit.ly/women-in-conceptual-art

Convened by Dr Jo Melvin and presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: A K Dolven. Stills from ‘Amazon’ 16mm film, mute, 1 min 34 (2005). Edited to the Allegro Molto of Shostakovich’s String Quartet No.8b In C Minor, Op. 110

 

TrAIN Events: May 2018

‘Utsuwa Utsushi’ 

Symposium
TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE  
(until 1st May)

4th May 2018, 9:00-19:00

Symposium – Banqueting Hall 
Exhibition/demonstration – Red Room

Chelsea College of Arts
16 John Islip Street
London SW1P 4JU

Hiroshi Onishi, Machiya of Image, 2012

Tickets £8/£6 (concession) 
refreshments and lunch included
Tickets are available HERE

Drawing from the wordplay of two etymologically associated Japanese terminologies: ‘Utsuwa’ (vessel, container, receptacle, vacuum, reality) and ‘Utsushi’ (copy, transfer, possessed), this symposium raises philosophical and visual cultural questions on the conventional idea of dichotomy ‘original’ vs ‘copy’, ‘fine art’ vs ‘applied art’/’craft’, ‘seen’ vs ‘unseen’ and ‘material’ vs ‘immaterial’.

According to Inaga Shigemi who inspired this symposium with his idea of ‘“Pirates’ View” of world history’, the current rigid legal regulations and knowledge production system set by Euroamerica have been challenged by the pirate’s trade their products and access to information.  However, the negativity attached to the idea of ‘copy’ also enables us to realise the positive values that can be found in the Japanese/East Asian ideas.

More Information and tickets are HERE

 

SYMPOSIUM: Speculative Design: Afrofuturist and indigenous projections

 

1.45-8PM, Wednesday 2 May 2018

Banqueting Suite, Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street London SW1P 4JU

This afternoon symposium brings together researchers and practitioners whose work engages with the themes of Afrofuturism, Indigenous Futures, and other emerging areas of science-fictional/future-orientated cultural practice in which people of colour, indigenous cultures and non-Western subjects take centre stage.

Speculative design will be addressed in terms of its ability to raise problems, rather than solve them. As a tool for speculation, it opens up spaces for presenting problems, to model alternatives, and to generate imaginative responses. It will be explored in relation to cultural practices including art, comics and science fiction writing.

SCHEDULE

13.30 – 14.00 Registration
14.00 – 14.15 Introduction to symposium proceedings

Dan Byrne-Smith

14.20 – 15.05 Keynote

Afrofuturism: Imaginaries, Realities and Practices

Professor Julian Henriques

15.10 – 15.55 Designing a Black Futurity

Florence Okoye

16.00 – 16.45 Finding Fatima: An exercise in location

Natascha Nanji

16.45 – 17.15 Break
17.15 – 18.00 Make It So: World-building in–and out of–Cyberspace

Skawennati

18.05 – 18.50 Keynote

This Is Not My Beautiful House: Reclaiming Our Futures from a Techno-Orientalist Vision

Kelly Kanayama

18.50 – 20.00 Drinks

This symposium is convened by Dr Dan Byrne-Smith, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art theory, Chelsea College of Arts and presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Book Tickets

Call for Papers: Victorian Patterns

The British Association for Victorian Studies is holding its 2018 annual conference at the University of Exeter, 29-31 August 2018 on the topic ‘Victorian Patterns’.

Pattern in the nineteenth century was a much-debated topic. The execution of repetitive forms of design became both industrialized and institutionalized thanks to new techniques of mechanized production. Everywhere the surfaces of material culture were alive with a profusion of ornamental patterns. An insatiable appetite for pattern affected the appearance of public spaces, domestic interiors, clothing and the objects of everyday life. At the same time, revolutions in science and technologies, in the global circulation of people, commodities and ideas, and in the conception and creation of new forms explored and exploited the ways in which patterns, both cultural and natural, shape and organize experience and subjectivity. Pattern was (and is) often seen as repetitive, constraining, unimaginative, and deadening, but patterns also live, energizing, structuring, and acting both within and beyond the reach of human intentionality and subjectivity. This conference will explore the life of pattern in the nineteenth century and the way in which in its contradictions, its reproducibility and its close connections with materiality and the everyday, pattern can be seen as a representative natural, aesthetic, cultural and techno-scientific mode. We invite proposals for individual papers of 15 minutes or 3-paper panel sessions, and we would particularly welcome alternative session formats designed to foster discussion or pose research problems for discussions (e.g. poster presentations, 3×5 minute position papers, roundtables or working groups, etc.) on, but not limited to, the following topics:

• Patterns in nature: temporal (geologic, seasonal), energy, physics, evolution.

• Scientific and technological patterns: mathematics, markets, engineering, textiles, city-planning.

• Patterns of imagery: language, style, and genre.

• Design and decorative patterns: arts, crafts, ornament, textiles, The House Beautiful, book design.

• Music and metrical patterns, poetics, performance.

• Global patterns: travel and circulation; settlement and empire; inheritance.

• Repetitions, replications, rhythm, habits, habitus, disruption of pattern, linearity, circularity, randomness, emergence, chaos.

• Patterns of behaviour and mood.

Please submit an individual proposal of 250-300 words or a group proposal of 1000 words to BAVS2018@exeter.ac.uk by the deadline of Tuesday 3rd of April. All proposals should include your name, email address and academic affiliation (if applicable).

See Call for papers PDF below…

BAVS 2018 CFP small

 

Call for Papers | Dossier: Cartographies of Design: Stories, Projects, Agendas

This Caiana dossier invites reflection on Design based on the call for texts which, with no geographical boundaries, approaches its configuration as a disciplinary field through the study of phenomena permitting the identification of its problem areas in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Also, it seeks to introduce a questioning of the categories that organized cartographies based on the material conditions of production of artefacts which are today a part of the History of Design, but were created when this discipline did not exist as such.

A historiographical gaze on the constitution of Design as a disciplinary field evidences that, during the last three decades, Design theoreticians and historians intended to distance themselves from accounts legitimating and not problematizing the discipline. Inasmuch as Design consolidated itself and developed as an autonomous area with specific modalities of production of knowledge, it was more open to debating acritical assumptions and normative and prescriptive methodologies.

Design was included in political agendas with various aims in mind: with the promise of representing the space par excellence from which to transform society and the lives of people, in order to produce development and innovation in public administration and policy, with the aim of exploring possible worlds outside the context of immediate necessity although it was also considered a manipulative, deceptive, sumptuary practice. In that framework, we can claim that Design negotiated its boundaries with Art, Economy, Sociology, History, Anthropology, Communication, Geography, Architecture and the Design disciplines, among others, not only because of its constitutively interdisciplinary nature, but also because its problem areas enabled the emergence of new fields of study, such as Design Culture, Visual Culture, Material Culture, Cultural Studies, the Sociology of Culture and Graphic Culture.

This has led us to speak about Culture(s), History (ies) and more recently Economy (ies) of Design to account for the scenarios, not devoid of conflictivity, in which its various objects of study are configured in contemporaneity.

In the context of the discussion about the conditions of possibility of a global history Design, certain characterizations have been criticized which define it as a field for industrially produced artefacts, i.e. machine-made artefacts produced in series. This gaze excluded from historic accounts experiences of countries with very sophisticated Design cultures, but which did not respond to that form of production or in which other relations were hierarchically-ordered, like the pair craftsmanship-design.

Through this appeal, Caiana proposes a dossier dedicated for the first time to the history of Design. Its objective is to foreground the multiple dimensions associated to writing about Design, observing the way in which its institutionalization and its role in political, social, economic or technological visibilization and invisibilization has been problematized by theory, History and practice. Thus, there is an intention to prompt debate by means of case studies and/or the explicitation of historiographic artefacts in which design takes centre stage as an issue or as a device which is a vehicle for meanings and logics which are its own in order to affect and interact with other disciplines.

 

Thematic focuses (not limiting)

Historiographic perspectives of Design histories of Latin American, African and Asian countries.

Problems in the construction of a History on the specificity of design as a form of knowledge.

Europe-US-Latin America dialogs in historiographic construction.

Exchanges between Art History and design.

Construction of otherness and gender perspectives in Design histories.

History of international Design networks and organizations and their Latin American agendas.

Interaction between Art History, Design History and Technology History in the State’s identity construction.

Museum projects, collectionism and Design archives.

Transmedia Design projects and information visualization devices in curatorial scripts for Art exhibitions.

Universal and Industrial Exhibitions.

Design as mediator, facilitator or as an obstacle in the generation, circulation and dissemination of knowledge.

 

The call for papers for this dossier will remain open until January 20, 2018

 

Bear in mind that the magazine is indexed in the catalogue of the Latindex and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) information systems.

 

See publishing guidelines at:

 

 

http://caiana.caia.org.ar/template/caiana.php?pag=../static/normas.php

CALL FOR ENTRIES | Difference Goes Speed Dating

Fancy a date with difference?

 

Difference Goes Speed Dating will be hosting a series of encounters between artists, students, academics and industry specialists engaged in lens-based media practices.

Using speed dating as a format, sixteen lucky participants will be joined by four invited artists to form randomised pairs and explore the ways they deal with the concept of difference in their practice. The aim is to survey and to attempt to tackle the issues surrounding difference, which include (and are not limited to) visual and non-visual representations of race, gender, sexuality, class, language, power and desire.

The resulting encounters will culminate in a public symposium, hosted by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme and held at Chelsea College of Arts in February 2018. Matched-up participants will present their findings and form further discussions exploring current and alternative ways of picturing difference in contemporary lens-based practices and beyond.

Given the political climate nationally and transnationally, understanding difference and challenging stereotypical perceptions around identity have become imperative. Difference Goes Speed Dating follows on from Professor Robert Storr’s rallying call to action, that “theory has its moment, but there is a time for empirical work” (TrAIN Open lecture, November 2016). This event invites dialogue between artists in creating a visual toolkit for tackling difference, in all its manifestations.

To apply to be a dater, whether student, academic, artist, or industry specialist, please complete this quick online form by Monday 30 October 2017: http://arts.ac.uk/speed-dating

You will be notified of the outcome on the week commencing 6th November 2017.

 

Speed Dating

17.00 20.00 | 29 November 2017

Red Room, Chelsea College of Arts, London

 


Symposium

10.00 – 18.00 | 23 February 2018

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts, London

For more information about the workshop please contact Dr Ope Lori: o.lori@chelsea.arts.ac.uk

Presented by Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Ope Lori

This event has been curated by Dr Ope Lori. She is a lens-based artist primarily working with moving-image, interested in the politics of looking practices, race, gender and representation. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and is currently completing a book on encountering difference through the lens. Dr Ope Lori is a TrAIN Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and BA Fine Art Associate Lecturer at Chelsea College of Arts and Lecturer at Leeds Arts University.

Image: Ope Lori, Alpha and Beta (2015). © Ope Lori.

The South London Post-Graduate Residency 17/18: Open Call

APPLICATIONS OPEN: DEADLINE MONDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 2017

This year the South London Gallery Post-Graduate Residency is an open submission six month residency opportunity available to artists completing an MA, MFA, PGDip, MRes or an equivalent programme of study (including alternative, peer organised and non-accredited programmes,) from an institution, collective or art school in the UK between October 2016 and October 2017. The residency is also being generously supported by Black Dog Publishing, allowing the recipient the opportunity to produce a publication.

Between November 2017 and May 2018, the resident will receive the following:
• rent-free accommodation and workspace in the SLG Outset Artists’ Flat;
• a £5,000 bursary to produce new work and help cover living expenses;
• monthly mentoring sessions from SLG staff and other art professionals across London;
• the opportunity to produce a publication with Black Dog Publishing;
• a solo exhibition in the SLG’s first floor galleries March 2018,
• A series of public events in response to the artist’s practice.

The residency enables the production of a new body of work and a rare opportunity for a recent graduate to exhibit within an internationally renowned institution.

CRITERIA
To be eligible for the residency applicants must:
• have completed a postgraduate MA, MFA, PGDip, MRes or equivalent programme of study (including alternative, peer organised and non-accredited programmes,) in an arts discipline from a UK institution, collective or art school, including Ireland, Scotland and Wales;
• be a UK/EU resident or hold a valid work visa with the right to stay in the UK for the entire duration of the residency.

We are particularly interested in receiving applications from those based outside of London; in this instance support for significant travel will be offered to those invited to interview.

TO APPLY


To apply for the South London Gallery Graduate Residency please visit http://southlondongallery.org/jobs-opportunities/

or call the gallery for more information, 02077036120. Completed applications should be sent to graduateresidency@southlondongallery.org by Monday 11 September 2017 at 12noon. Applications received after this time will not be considered.

Applications should include:
• a completed application form (Please note that the total content of the application form, including images, must not exceed 9.5MB. We can also accept the five images via a download link, wetransfer);
• a CV listing details of education and qualifications attained and details of any recent exhibitions, commissions, awards, publications and employment – two pages maximum;
• five images, video links or audio clips of recent work.

Interviews will take place at the South London Gallery on 10-11 October 2017, if required, support for travel can be provided.

We regret we are unable respond to all applicants, if you have not heard anything by Thursday 5 October 2017 you should assume your application has been unsuccessful.

The South London Gallery Post-Graduate Residency
Supported by Black Dog Publishing www.blackdogonline.com.

 The South London Gallery receives ongoing support from:
Arts Council England, Southwark Council and Outset

Image: Alicia Reyes McNamara, Nowhere Else, installation view
at the South London Gallery, 2017. Courtesy Alicia Reyes
McNamara. Photo Andy Stagg