Category Archives: Staff

PAINTING RESEARCH SEMINAR: ADRIAN MORRIS AND THE 1978 HAYWARD ANNUAL

Thu 25th Oct 18:30 – 20:00
FREE EVENT ALL WELCOME

The paintings of Adrian Morris (1929-2004) had their first major exposure forty years
ago at the 1978 Hayward Annual. Noted for its all-women selection committee and
predominantly female exhibitors, the ‘feminist’ annual also offered a cross-section of
art in Britain at the end of an uneasy, indeterminate decade. In the context of the
South Bank’s brutalist architecture, the exhibition explored – not least with Morris’s
highly individual work – zones between utopia and dystopia, public space and private
psychology, the human and the cosmic.

This seminar will revisit the ’78 Hayward Annual, tracing the subsequent trajectories
of some of its participants and reflecting on what such survey shows reveal from
current perspectives. Morris’s work, currently subject to rediscovery and
reinterpretation, will be a central focus

With Merlin James (Glasgow), Anna Susanna Woof (Berlin), Matthew Pang (London)
and Lillian Lijn (UK) and others to be announced

Convened by Daniel Sturgis

Organised by Camberwell College of Arts and 42 Carlton Place

VIS Issue 2, Open Call for Proposals: Estrangement

VIS – Nordic Journal for Artistic Research – opens its call for exposition proposals for Issue 2. The theme is “Estrangement”. The call is open between 1 September and 1 November 2018.

Theme for Issue 2: Estrangement

Svetlana Boym writes, in Architecture of the Off-Modern:

By making things strange, the artist does not simply displace them from an everyday context into an artistic framework; he also helps to “return sensation” to life itself, to reinvent the world, to experience it anew. Estrangement is what makes art artistic; but, by the same token, it makes life lively, or worth living. (Buell Center/FORUM Project & Princeton Architectural Press 2008, p. 18–19.)

This is a different notion of estrangement than the use of the term established by Bertolt Brecht in theatre – as a method of enhancing criticality and an awareness of the levels of fiction – as well as from the Marxist use of the term; an alienation of social relations due to wage labour and reification. Boym’s description seems to involve documentarism, collecting and archival activities – practices where things are isolated or combined in an unexpected way; they suggest a resisting of the erosion of memories and a perhaps vain attempt to postpone the slow and gradual disappearance of things.

In artistic research, there is an additional “double” or “second” estrangement that is crucial: after “making things strange” we, as artists and researchers, engage in another process of self-alienation (and self-understanding) in order to look at our own methods “from the outside”. This estrangement from the working process is vital as part of the attempt to find a language that is able to articulate experiences from artistic practice, and even to evolve theories about that practice.

VIS invites those wishing to submit artistic research material that manifests a reflection upon estrangement – be it from the perspective of Brecht, Marxism, Boym, “second strangement” or any other viewpoint. Art works and expositions should have a clear relation to the theme and be conceived for the benefit both of those within the field and those beyond the sphere of artistic research. Expositions in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish or English are all welcome.

How to apply?

Send your application to visjournal@uniarts.se latest by 1 November 2018. Please, include the following:

  1. Written proposal (PDF-format) containing a short description of your exposition (1–2 A4 pages) including how it relates to the theme “Estrangement”. Also include language choice for the exposition (English, Swedish, Danish or Norwegian).
    2. CV (with country of residence and/or national context).
    3. 1–3 examples of previous artistic research/artistic projects/art work. High resolution images, movies and audio files can be sent through wetransfer.com.

Please note that your exposition should not have been published previously. If certain parts of the exposition have been published, please describe how and when in the application.

Read more!

Sculptureless Sculpture | Villa Lontana

Curated by Dr. Jo Melvin and Vittoria Bonifati This exhibition at Villa Lontana launches a new collaborative exchange between the Fondazione Dinoed Ernesta Santarelli and contemporary art. Through creating a series of intimate juxtapositions, we hope to draw attention to the performative and sculptural elements that are inherent in classical statuary and architectural fragments, to the potential of being experienced within the context and concerns of contemporary practice. Sculptureless Sculpture brings film and other projected work with
selected artworks and fragments from the Fondazione Santarelli. John Baldessari I Am Making Art (1971) and Baldessari Sings LeWitt (1973), Elisabetta Benassi, Son of Niobe (2013), Ketty La Rocca Appendice Per Una Supplica (1972), Mario Merz, Lumaca (1970) and Ad Reinhardt Travel Slides (1952-1967) will be shown alongside a selection of works from the Fondazione Santarelli including: Giove Eliopolitano III AD, Greek female head I BC, arm fragment II AD, torso of Alexander the Great III AD, fragment of striated sarcophagus II AD, Pinax with theatre masks I AD, Etruscan high relief of Perseus and Medusa V BC and a cleric from Palmyra III AD.

Villa Lontana translates into English as Faraway Villa, was so named because of its distance from the city of Rome. It was literally faraway on a hill. Slowly the city grew to surround it, with land changing from fields and vineyards to conurbation. As an ancient site and an historical building, Villa Lontana provides the opportunity to retrace the complex multilayers of histories of the area of Rome near the Milvian Bridge (built 115 BC). A Roman necropolis of more than one hundred sixty tombs dating back to the first half of the I BC has recently been ‘rediscovered’. Since the Middle Ages the Villa Lontana Estate has been recorded on maps due to its proximity to the Milvian bridge and the Via Francigena. Later it belonged to the Orsini family and then, from the second half of the XVII century, to the Reverend Apostolic Chamber. The property once a notable vineyard, became an exotic garden and the main building was transformed from a rural country house to become the Casino delle delizie (Casino of delights) taking on the imprint of the “illustrious” people that passed through the estate, from Prince Stanislao Poniatowski to Claude Poussin, Antonio Canova and Bertel Thorvaldsen and for the latter three the situation of the Villa created a backdrop for painting and sculpture. Further
changes to the historical building have been made by the British consul among the Vatican Giovanni Freeborn, the engineer, architect and oenologist Giovanni Gabet and by the first director of the American Academy in Rome Samuel A.B. Abbott.

The Collezione Dino ed Ernesta Santarelli spans from the Ptolemaic period until the XIX century with a particular interest on Roman statuary and coloured marbles from Imperial Rome, architecture fragments and painting on stone. There is also an extensive collection of Glyptic art, spanning across five millennia, which is in loan at the Capitolini Museums in Rome.

Private view: Wednesday 16 May, 6pm to 9pm.

The exhibition is open:
17 May – 6 June 2018
11am – 7pm
Tuesday – Saturday and by appointment.

Tel: +39 3392365274
Address:
Via Cassia 53, 00191, Roma

The exhibition is in the former garage of Villa Lontana, designed in 2010 by architect Fabio Ortolani.

Call for Papers – Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting As Model

Yve-Alain Bois’ “Painting as Model” which was Published 1993 is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being a conceptual and material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

To coincide with the Painting as ReModel Conference at Camberwell College of Arts on the  20 & 21 June 2018 and the Journal of Contemporary Painting Special Issue on the subject, we are looking for papers that address ideas and issues that connect to Bois’ Painting As Model.

Abstract Submissions

150 words by April 16th to    academicadminfineart@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

PQ 2019 | Site Specific Performance Festival Open Call

Wimbledon PhD Graduate, Dr. Sophie Jump, is the curator of the Site Specific Performance Festival at the Prague Quadrennial 2019.

www.pq.cz/en/opencall-site-specific-performance-festival

An International Jury awarded the Prague Quadrennial as one of the 12 of the most trend- setting European festivals of the 2015 from a pool of 760 festivals from 31 countries. The main criteria were Artistic Merit, Innovation, Internationality, Political Value and Sustainability.

From the EFFE jury statement: “Another hugely significant international gathering in its eld, the Prague Quadrennial has identi ed a specific area of artistic practice and made a great impact. Its programmes for students and young professionals are an extremely important aspect of its programme, making it a vital gathering for young artists and designers where they can come together and invent the future of stage design.”

PQ festival is the liveliest, and perhaps the most energizing and inspiring part of PQ that speaks about our contemporary experience, forges new connections, brings new audiences, and gives an opportunity to many artists not only from the area of performance design but also all other related fields to share the newest ideas and most current reflections of our world today. There is an open call to performance designers, directors, choreographers, performers and artists to bring their performances inspired by PQ site and Prague locations where performance design plays integral role and works that could change the regular patterns of the daily city life into a series of memorable moments. The festival is both an incubator and a forecaster of new trends in performance.

The Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space invites submissions for the Site Specific Performance Festival, a curated, non-competitive project that will take place in Prague, 7-15 June 2019. Proposals are accepted from performance designers, directors, choreographers, performers and artists of all career levels.

CURATOR: Sophie Jump

DATES: 
• Call Published: 30 November 2017
• Deadline for Submission: 28 February 2018
• Official Selection Announced: 15 April 2018
• 14th Edition of Prague Quadrennial: 6-16 June 2019
• Site Specific Performance Festival: 7-15 June 2019

For more information and conditions for submissions for the Site Specific Performance Festival, please, follow attached files.

Please complete attached form in English and return to call@pq.cz saved as “artistname.application.pdf” with email subject line SITE SPECIFIC. Deadline for submission is 28 February 2018. No handwritten or incomplete applications will be accepted. Carefully read the Call for Applications before filling out this form.

Bentham and the Arts

Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon’s Graduate School Director and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Malcolm Quinn, is co-convening a seminar series on Bentham and the Arts.

The seminar series will consider the sceptical challenge presented by Jeremy Bentham’s hedonistic utilitarianism to the existence of the aesthetic, as represented in the oft-quoted statement that, ‘Prejudice apart, the game of push-pin is of equal value with the arts and sciences of music and poetry. If the game of push-pin furnish more pleasure, it is more valuable than either.’ This statement is one part of a complex set of arguments on culture, taste, and utility that Bentham pursued over his lifetime, in which sensations of pleasure and pain were opposed to aesthetic sensibility.

Hosted by the Bentham Project and Faculty of Laws, University College London and the University of the Arts, London

Sponsored by UCL Faculty of Laws; UCL Bentham Project; and the International Society for Utilitarian Studies (ISUS)

Co convenors: Anthony Julius (UCL); Malcolm Quinn (UAL); Philip Schofield (UCL)

All seminars take place on Tuesday evenings, at 6.00 pm, at UCL.  All are welcome.

The seminars on 30 January, 20 February, 6 March and 20 March 2018 will take place in G10 Lecture Theatre, Chandler House, 2 Wakefield Street, London, WC1N 1PF.

The remaining seminars will take place in the Moot Court, Bentham House, Endsleigh Gardens, London, WC1H 0EG.

For abstracts of papers, please consult the full programme.

30 January 2018 BENTHAM SYMPOSIUM. Bentham’s Challenge to Aesthetics: Benjamin Bourcier (Catholic University of Lille); Malcolm Quinn (University of the Arts, London); Philip Schofield (UCL)
20 February 2018 Anthony Julius (UCL): Who was the greater champion of literature, Bentham or Mill?
6 March 2018 Stella Sandford (Kingston): ‘Envy accompanied with Antipathy’: Bentham and Freud on the Psychology of Sexual Ressentiment
20 March 2018 Tim Milnes (Edinburgh): Bentham, Romanticism, and the Arts
1 May 2018 Frances Ferguson (Chicago): Jeremy Bentham’s Expansive Aesthetics: Pushpin Too
22 May 2018 Emmanuelle de Champs (Cergy-Pointoise): Bentham and Dumont on Taste and Literature
29 May 2018 Carey Young (UCL): tbc
5 June 2018 Fran Cottell (University of the Arts London) and Marianne Mueller (Architectural Association): Pentagon Petal: from Pain to Pleasure
19 June 2018 Carolyn Shapiro (Falmouth): The Image of Bentham

For enquiries please contact Phil Baker, UCL Laws: philip.baker@ucl.ac.uk (020 3108 8480).

Call For Papers | VISUAL PEDAGOGIES | London 2018

5th Biennial Conference of the

International Association for Visual Culture

September 13 – 15, 2018

UCL Institute of Education

Confirmed Participants:

Jill Casid (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Keynote); Teresa Cisneros (The Showroom); Inés Dussel (Cinvestav, Mexico, Keynote); Joanne Morra (Central Saint Martins); Griselda Pollock (University of Leeds, Keynote); Amanda du Preez (University of Pretoria); Emily Pringle (Tate); Will Strong (Calvert 22); Sofia Victorino  (Whitechapel Gallery)

Can we teach what we see? Can we see what we teach? How is the world changed, reaffirmed, or progressed through the visual? How does it slip back? What impact can thoughtful uses of images in teaching, scholarship, artistic, and political practice have on the future, as well as on the telling of history?

How can we as scholars, practitioners, educators, and concerned citizens of the world see ourselves as teachers of and through the visual, whatever our context?

The International Association for Visual Culture welcomes papers and creative proposals that address the issues of visual pedagogies from different starting points that include but are not limited to:

The visual as a tool for teaching: i.e., teaching through showing, uses of interactive learning tools including Digital Humanities, using the classroom as a space for community involvement or public-facing projects;

Visual pedagogies as a political tool: from the protest image to leveraging an image as a tool for “militant research”;

The teaching of Visual Culture Studies: academia and visual culture, teaching and inventing diverging new methodologies in teaching the significance of visual literacy across disciplines, including the critical consumption and production of images;

Thinking through ways to “decolonize the classroom” in changes in course structure, assigned texts, and assessment;

Different challenges posed across visual media, both historically and in terms of the media themselves: film versus photography; prints versus text; digital versus postdigital;

Interrogating racism, gender and sexual discrimination, ableism, and religious, and ethnic persecution through visual pedagogies;

The significance of the visual in a world where “alternative facts” and “post-truth” discourse is infiltrating public discourse and threatening democracy;

The visual as a scientific instrument: We welcome proposals that tackle the questions of various scientific approaches to visual pedagogies;

Emancipation and the pedagogy of the visual: breaking the ‘all seeing eye,’ including both challenging the truth of the image, and introducing non-ocular-centrism to fields like Visual Culture Studies, Art History, Film Studies, artistic practice, and political engagement.

To submit…

Papers and artistic or live (including interactive) contributions that engage the question of the visual in teaching through a historical lens are also very welcome. Our aim is to use the conference as a platform to discuss not only the pressing issues of the contemporary, but the legacies of visual pedagogies, including how people have leveraged images to teach people “how to see the world” for centuries.

Submission: Proposals should be 250 – 500 words in length and may include supplementary material (i.e., images, videos, links). Please also include an abbreviated CV and/or a link to a professional website.

Please direct all submissions in PDF format to GreetingsIAVC@gmail.com by the November 30, 2017 deadline.

Organization: The conference will be organized around a series of keynote speakers, and core thematic panels with breakout sessions. We will assign the core themes based on proposals. We invite anyone interested especially in organizing a “teaching session” (i.e., a demonstration, group activity, etc.) to specify this in their proposal.

Support for speakers and contributors: The IAVC will charge a sliding scale fee for conference attendance. These details will be posted on our website in early 2018. We hope to be able to offer assistance to speakers and contributors who can demonstrate financial need.

Timeline: We will be reviewing submissions in late 2017. We expect a large pool of applications and plan to send our responses to the CFP in February 2018.

Homecoming

If someone told you time traveling was a possibility.

If someone told you they have done it on many occasions.

You would laugh at them, wouldn’t you?

That’s what she had said.

I go over these words in my head

now that I am sitting in the empty hotel room.

I go over these words and I think to myself: can it be true?

The ashtray still containing the ends of the cigarettes she smoked.

It’s not at all how you imagine it.

It’s not at all how you imagine it.

 

Image: Carrick Bell ‘Willing to Die’ 2016, video still

Text:  Hannes Ribarits ‘Ashtray’, 2017, acrylic and spray-paint on canvas (170cm x 170cm)

Opening reception: Tuesday 3 October, 5-8pm

Exhibition runs 4-6 October, 12-6pm

 

An exhibition of works by Carrick Bell (US/DE) and Hannes Ribarits (AT/DE) including immersive installations, paintings, moving image and murals. Curated by Emma Gradin.

 

Triangle Space

Chelsea College of Arts

16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

 

Carrick Bell (b. 1981, Anchorage, AK) received his MFA from SAIC in 2008, and a BA from Hampshire College in 2004. Residencies include Ox-Bow (2009), the Wassaic Project (2016) and NARS Foundation (2017). Recent exhibitions include at Kunsthalle Exnergasse (Vienna), Charim Gallery (Vienna), LW56 (Vienna), .hbc (Berlin), Brooklyn Pavillion of the Shanghai Biennale, and BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music). He is also co-founder and co-director of Berlin-based artist run space HORSEANDPONY Fine Arts.

Hannes Ribarits is a Berlin based artist who graduated from Central Saint Martins College, London and the University of Applied Arts, Vienna. His work has been exhibited or screened in venues such as Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art (Sunderland), HEDAH (Maastricht), Kunstbunker (Nuremberg), pinacoteca (Vienna), The Hayward Gallery (London), Liljevalchs Hubb (Stockholm) and he was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries (UK). Ribarits also organised the six-part exhibition series Room of Requirement, taking place in different locations in Berlin throughout 2014-15 and co-curated group shows at Ve.Sch (Vienna), Forgotten Bar (Berlin), HORSEANDPONY Fine Arts (Berlin) and Kunsthalle Exnergasse (with Vienna based curator Li Tasser).

Emma Gradin is an independent curator and research student at Chelsea College of Arts developing and deploying curatorial strategies founded on extended states of not-knowing and creative suspension in the current context of time-shortness and accelerated productivity/consumption.

 

 

 

Call for Papers: Beyond Myths: Ideas, Values, and Processes in Design History

Beyond Myths: Ideas, Values, and Processes in Design History
ARCOS DESIGN
Vol 10, Número 1, April 2018
Editor: João de Souza Leite

This is a call for papers for Arcos Design magazine, Volume 10, number 1, concerning the History of Design.

Arcos Design is an academic journal in design, peer-reviewed, linked to the Graduate Program in Design of the School of Design (ESDI), State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Created in the 1990s by members of the ESDI faculty, when design post-graduate education in Brazil began, Arcos Design persists in promoting the intersection of design studies with philosophy, sociology, economics, in order to expand the understanding of the system of production and consumption of artifacts in general. The word Arcos refers not only to the historical site where ESDI is located, in downtown of Rio de Janeiro, in front of an old aqueduct of the 18th century, but also to the bridges that it intends to establish with several areas of knowledge.

After its edition was suspended for some time, the magazine was revived in digital format in the ESDI Graduate Program in Design, available at
http://www.e-publicacoes.uerj.br/index.php/arcosdesign/index.

Call for papers

We seek contributions that allow the understanding of design outside the conventional lines of historical investigation. In this sense, approaches that deal with the insertion of observed phenomena in all types of context, as long as well characterized, are of interest. In the range of questions raised by the terms “ideas, values, and processes”, it is important to articulate reflections in the historical dimension, whether in the past or in the present time, as well as investigate processes of invention and design properly located in cultural and technological geographies.

The following topics can be addressed, though not exclusively:
1.       epistemological and methodological issues about the making of history;
2.       historiographic issues facing the current challenges of design – history of
ideas, history of concepts, intellectual history, among other possibilities;
3.       relations between distinct cultural manifestations;
4.       world history versus unique stories, clearly identified with specific contexts;
5.       micro-history of design – recording and critique of culturally located
productions;
6.       macro-history in design – topics;
7.       gender issues in project practice;
8.       identity issues in project practice;
9.       particular design processes in design;
10.     historical topics in technology and design – e.g. linearity / modularity, analog /
digital.

We are grateful for the submission of contributions, which will be submitted to a peer-review process, with two evaluations. In case of a tie, a third evaluation will be requested. For the first time in the history of the publication, this edition of Arcos Design will have worldwide circulation, and therefore will be edited in English.

The size and format of contributions may vary from topical observations to the presentation of graphic or photographic documentation. The work shall be conducted at the academic level, and the academic articles formatted according to specified conventions.

BAUHAUS 100: Panel Discussion

3pm – 6.30pm | Friday, 9 June 2017 Wilson Road Hall Camberwell College of Arts 1 Wilson Road SE5 8LU

Join us for a lively panel discussion considering the influence of the Bauhaus on art and design in the UK. We will think and work through ideas and aspects of the Bauhaus pedagogy and consider the ways in which it might relate to the contemporary practices of teaching and art making.

This panel discussion follows two days of intensive workshops led by our international partners from Albers Foundation and Bauhaus Dessau. It is an opportunity for anyone interested to become involved in the first stage of a two-year research and events programme in celebration of the centenary year of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Chair: David Crow, Pro Vice-Chancellor UAL and Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon



Panel members:


Torsten Blume, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation 
Fritz Horstman, Albers Foundation


Jane Collins, Professor of Theatre and Performance, UAL


Daniel Sturgis, Reader and Programme Director Fine Art, Camberwell College of Arts


Tracey Waller, Course Leader BA Graphic Design, Camberwell College of Arts



The discussion takes place from 3pm – 4.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. Free and open to all.
 RSVP to reserve your place: ccw.rsvp@arts.ac.uk . 

In partnership with Bauhaus Dessau and the Albers Foundation.