Category Archives: Staff

Ligatus Summer School 2017

Ligatus Research Centre (UAL) are pleased to announce the that registration for our Summer School is now Open.

It will be held on 25-29 September and 2-6 October in Norwich, UK, Cathedral Library

Week 1 (25-29 September): Identifying and Recording Bookbinding Structures of the Eastern Mediterranean 

Tutors: Dr Athanasios Velios and Dr Georgios Boudalis

Week 2 (2-6 October): European Bookbinding, 1450-1830 

Tutor: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad

For more information and registration please visit: http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/node/473

Jessica Ogden: Still

31-33 Church St, London NW8 8ES

26 May – 23 June 2017 (11.00 – 18.00 Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Private View: Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.00 – 20.00 (RSVP to [email protected])

May 2017 sees the opening of an exhibition by Jessica Ogden in London. Entitled Still, it acts as an exploration of Jessica’s work through the static display of archive and current works, alongside a series of workshops. Church Street, Marylebone plays host to the experience, which was born out of a long running conversation between Jessica and Professor Carol Tulloch, writer and curator at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL, who will curate the exhibition. The space is designed by Professor Judith Clark, a London-based curator, who collaborated closely with Jessica.

Born and raised in Jamaica, Jessica began her career in fashion reusing the old to create the new. In 1992, after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Byam Shaw School of Art, she joined Oxfam’s NoLoGo project. Working with donated clothes, Jessica found herself at the forefront of what was then termed customising. The following year Ogden launched her own label using traditional stitching, hand printing and layering techniques and often appropriating old garments such as quilts. Soon after the label’s launch, Ogden staged catwalk shows and presentations as part of London Fashion Week from 1996-2006. Her work continued with cult French label A.P.C., with whom after moving to Paris, she deepened her work to include a line of quilts made from archive A.P.C. fabrics, another example of her continuing obsession with repurposing in fashion.

In 2016 Jessica made the decision to return to live in Jamaica, taking over the running of Harmony Hall, her mother’s gallery which champions local Jamaican art, alongside continuing her fashion projects. Perhaps it was this move that offered Jessica the perspective to look back on her journey thus far. A large theme running through all of Jessica’s work is story telling. In the same way, the exhibition will act as an autobiographical study through the selection and display of pivotal work. Alongside this, Jessica will hold free workshops for the visitors to the exhibition, which in themselves will provide insight and inspiration into her unique practice. Workshops will include free hemming and customisation, amongst other activities. Three workshops will be led by Ogden and places are limited.

To illustrate and further explain the exhibition Jessica and Carol have worked on a publication with accompanying imagery by Syd Shelton and text by Tamsin Blanchard.

Jessica Ogden: Still has been curated by Professor Carol Tulloch and is a Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School project.

Press enquiries: [email protected] | Exhibition or workshop enquiries: [email protected]

 

Call for Papers | MIRAJ | Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Moving Image Review & Art Journal | Issue 7:2

Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Call for Papers | Deadline: 1 March 2017

This issue will be guest edited by Rashmi Sawhney and Lucia King.

The uncontestably global ecologies of contemporary moving image art have invited some deliberation on questions of regional aesthetics, identity, circulation and transnationalism. Yet such discussions have mainly taken place in the context of exhibiting ‘non-western’ art in the western world. Contradictions still persist in the project of destabilizing assumed hierarchies within the Euro-American art world (in the most recent Documenta XI and Venice Biennale, for example) whilst artists of the global South gain currency primarily by meeting the expectations of ‘western’ art markets. Furthermore, Euro-American art historical discourse remains negligent of film and video art’s legacies from the South, including experimental film and screen-based arts. As a consequence, moving image art by ‘non-western’ artists is either caged into essentialist frameworks founded on mythical notions of ‘authenticity’, or stirred into the melting pot of contemporary art without due attention to their particular cultural and aesthetic contexts. This MIRAJ issue, therefore, engages with the particularities of film and video art practices from South Asia, and leverages these in theorising the relationship between regional, global and transnational moving image cultures.

To address some of these gaps in scholarship, this special edition of MIRAJ focuses on the circuits of production, exhibition and authoring of South Asian artists moving image in order to chart key theoretical terrains of ‘regional’ practices in a global context. We solicit articles from artists, critics and curators who work within and outside South Asia, that highlight conceptual frameworks and offer insights on the multi-layered relationships between ‘home and the world’, region and identity, aesthetics and translatability, cultural specificities and contexts of classification/consumption/circulation. We invite articles that build upon foundational work in South Asian moving image art and film histories as well as transnational art practices and aesthetics.

We are particularly interested in articles that address the following:

• Theories of film and video art outside of the ‘national’ framework that are attentive to influences, collaborations and exchanges across geographic and political regions.
• Examples of significant regional exchanges and collaborations between artists and filmmakers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
• The relationship between region, identity and moving image practice in South Asia.
• The aesthetic pre-cursors (in a pre-cinematic sense) that influence contemporary moving image art in the region, including investigations of artist(s)’ methodologies.
• Experiments in film and video art that emphasise ‘indigenous forms’.
• Transnational curatorial practices that work with and around the regional/national framework.
• Historicising South Asian moving image art in the post-medium context.
• Spectatorship and post medium/ multi-media art in/from South Asia.
• South Asian artists’ moving image engagement with science, political activism, environmentalism, urbanism etc.
• South Asian artists’ moving image hybridity with alternate media genres, such as experimental film, documentary, and digital media.
• Digital media and the exhibition and distribution of ‘regional’ moving image art.
• Digital archives and curatorial practices in/about South Asian film & video art.

We publish the following types of writing: scholarly articles (5000-7000 words); opinion pieces, feature articles and interviews (3000-5000 words); review essays of books, individual works, exhibitions and events (3000-5000 words). Scholarly articles will be blind peer-reviewed and feature articles and review essays can be peer-reviewed on request. Articles submitted to MIRAJ should be original and not under consideration by any other publication, including online publications. We do not publish articles by artists about their own work, nor reviews by curators or venues about their own exhibitions.

Please submit completed manuscripts only.
Send all contributions by e-mail in Word format to the Editorial Assistant: [email protected].

Deadline for completed articles: 1 March 2017
Image: Prisms of perception, (2010) Artist: Gigi Scaria. Medium: Video installation. (Image courtesy of the artist).

Concrete Poetry: UK Networks & Connections – Research Symposium

A CCW & CSM research event part of University of the Arts London (UAL) Research Fortnight 2017

Date: 15 March 2017
Venue: Chelsea College of Arts (Banqueting Hall), University of the Arts London
Admission free 
After decades of scarce academic interest in Concrete poetry, over the last few years a
number of UK-based researchers have started to produce new work, including several
PhD projects (some now completed), approaching this complex subject from both
artistic and literary perspectives.

Concrete poetry, originally a literary movement heavily influenced by Modernist art
(Constructivism and Concrete art), appeared in Brazil, Germany and Switzerland in
the mid-1950s, and was characterized for privileging the visual (typographical)
arrangement of words over more traditional elements of the poem (sound and
meaning). It was adopted by visual artists and incorporated into art practice during
the early and mid-1960s, becoming an international phenomenon through a network
of little magazines, self-publishing and a few influential exhibitions, with the UK
playing an important role in this development.

This would be the first symposium held in the UK aiming at bringing together
academic researchers working in the field of Concrete poetry. Presenters will be
invited to talk about their current topics of work, with panel discussions providing an
overview of the current state of the investigation. There will be a general theme, UK
networks and connections in Concrete poetry, but the emphasis would be for
researchers active in this area to present their recent work.

The symposium will present new, original contributions to our knowledge of the
complex relations of literature and the visual arts, making explicit multiple forms and
examples of mutual influence within experimental practices during the 1960s.
Although the perspective would be primarily historical, it will also be relevant to
current expanding fields like conceptual writing and artists’ writing and publishing.

Programme:
9.45 Welcome/Opening: Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Morning panel
Chair: Dr Michael Asbury 10.00 Paper 1 Dr Steve Willey
10.30 Paper 2 Nicola Simpson
11.00 Paper 3 Gustavo Grandal Montero

(Break 11.30-11.45)

11.45 Paper 4 Dr Greg Thomas
12.15 Paper 5 Alice Tarbuck
12.45 Panel discussion
(1.00pm Lunch break)

Afternoon panel
Chair: Dr Alison Green
2.00pm Paper 6 Dr Michael Asbury
2.30pm Paper 7 Dr Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação 3.00pm Paper 8 Jasmin Wrobel
3.30pm Paper 9 Dr Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

(Break 4-4.15pm)

4.15pm Keynote: ‘Concrete Poetry: Then and now’, Prof. Stephen Bann
4.45pm Panel discussion
5pm Ends

Organised by Gustavo Grandal Montero, PhD candidate, Central Saint Martins (UAL)
and Academic Support Librarian, Chelsea College of Arts / Camberwell College of Arts
(UAL) [email protected]
Advisory panel: Michael Asbury, Alison Green, Jo Melvin (UAL). Nicola Simpson
(NUCA) and Greg Thomas (Edinburgh).

An exhibition of Concrete poetry from the nationally important holdings in the Special
Collections at Chelsea College of Arts Library will be held 13-31 March to coincide with
the symposium, highlighting the role of UAL archives and special collections in PhD
research. Exhibition open to UAL staff and students, alumni and SCONUL members
during library opening hours. External visitors by appointment only.

Image: Futura, issues 1-26. Courtesy of Hansjörg Mayer.

Speakers:

Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Welcome/Opening

Dr. Steve Willey
Visual and verbal permutations in the work of Bob Cobbing Over the last ten years and on both sides of the Atlantic, ‘Make perhaps this out sense of can you’ (1963), a seventeen-line permutation poem by British Concrete Poet Bob Cobbing, has repeatedly been used as the point of access into the world of Cobbing. In 2007 the poem’s title was used as the name for an intermedia event and exhibition of Cobbing materials at the Rosenwald Gallery in the Van-Pelt Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania. In 2011, a BBC Radio 4 documentary on Cobbing used the poem’s title, as did an academic symposium on Cobbing’s work held at Chelsea College of Arts in 2015. This paper argues that using ‘Make Perhaps This Out Sense of Can You’ to signal a critical engagement with Cobbing’s work today, revisits and amplifies relationships between criticism (the making of sense) and community (the making of a ‘School’) that were operating on the poem at the point of its composition in 1963, and further explores broader relationships between permutation and British Concrete poetry.

Nicola Simpson
the sun-cheese wheel-ode and other no things: performing no thingness in the work of dom sylvester houédard, ken cox & li yuan chia
This paper will focus on performing no thingness, the exhibition I recently curated for East Gallery at Norwich University of the Arts (2016). Exhibiting the previously unseen book of onomasticons by dsh, the rarely shown five elemental balloon poem by Ken Cox, and magnetic multiples by Li Yuan Chia, the intention was to demonstrate how, for each artist, performance was central to their understanding and making of poemobjects, poemscores and poemenvironments. These three artists all knew each other, sharing an interest in the Eastern Buddhisms and Taoisms that present objects not as things but as relationships, events and actions. Concluding with a screening of the documented performance of “the sun-cheese wheel-ode a double-rolling-gloster memorial for kencox”, I will illustrate how my doctoral research and curatorial practice has been engaged with (re)performing the archive of dsh to create a space “in which words wld move thru the air”.

Gustavo Grandal Montero
Materialising language: concrete poetry and UK art schools in the mid-1960s
The topic of my research is the relation between Concrete poetry and conceptual art, and the ‘turn to language’ in visual arts during the 1960s. During this decade, a large number of artists embraced ‘new’ media and dematerialised practices, with a significant proportion using language/text as the basis of their work, notably conceptual artists. My presentation will concentrate on the adoption of Concrete poetry by artists and designers based in UK art schools, and its rapid evolution in the central years of the decade (1964-1967), as evidenced at Chelsea School of Art in the collaborations of Edward Wright (dsh, John Furnival, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Stephen Bann, etc.) and the work of Tom Edmonds and others.

Dr. Greg Thomas
The provincial sixties: Literary and artistic culture in the Midlands, West Country and Wales
This paper will explore regional literary and artistic communities during what Arthur Marwick calls the “long sixties” (ca. 1958-74), focusing especially on centres of activity in the Midlands, West Country and Wales. The aim is to interrogate London-centric conceptions of the era’s defining cultural trends by exploring the socio-cultural backdrops and literary and artistic outputs of these alternative cultural centres, emphasising their relationship to defining “sixties” genres such as concrete poetry. The first part of my paper will explore current conceptions of the sixties focused upon London as a hub of literary and artistic activity, established partly by influential memoirs from Jeff Nuttall’s Bomb Culture to Barry Miles’s In the Sixties. I will then sketch out a number of alternative sixties cultural centres, primarily around Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, and Nottingham. Alluding to relevant social and cultural backdrops – the expansion of the university sector, the increasing (and increasingly regionally-focused) provisions of the Arts Councils, the growth of a transnational counter-culture – I will consider the typical operations of such communities, involving independent bookshops, galleries, small presses and magazine series, which became nexuses within national and international cultural networks. These networks were generally connected to North America, and thus to the aesthetics of objectivist, beat and Black Mountain poetry, and of intermedia and pop art; and often with South America and Northern Europe, and thus with the concrete art and poetry movements. Finally, I will consider some exemplary publishing projects of the period, and some of the literature and art produced within such communities. I will allude to some possible implications of this re-adjusted conception of sixties culture by adapting recent insights on late and global modernisms.

Alice Tarbuk
The unstable legacy of concrete poetry in the work of Thomas A. Clark
In 2015 the Hayward Gallery published a work entitled The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century. Amongst emergent concrete and visual artists such as Greg Thomas and Sophie Herxheimer, it was perhaps surprising to see the inclusion of those poet/artists whose work had also formed part of the original concrete poetry ‘renaissance’ of the 1960s, including Stuart Mills, David Bellingham and Thomas A. Clark. (1) (2) It was correct to include Clark amongst the newer visual artist/poets in the anthology, because Clark’s relationship to concrete poetry is neither old nor new: it has been, and continues to be, a major influence on his work.
Indeed, concrete poetry is perhaps the single biggest influence on Clark’s poetic output, and has been since he began making work in the 1960s. In interviews, he credits the wedding gift of an Adana, and his friendship with Ian Hamilton Finlay as the catalysts for his poetic career: he began, then, with concrete poetry. (3)

This paper argues that Clark’s approach to concrete poetry is unusual because, unlike Finlay’s, it persists into the post-concrete era. Clark’s approach to his influences is one of advance and return: he both participates in, and draws back from them, and this is no different for his relationship with concrete poetry, remaining perhaps a little apart from it, even where its influence is clear, making him at once a concrete poet, and a post-concrete poet.
(1) Emmett Williams speaks of ‘the concrete ‘renaissance’ in England, Germany and Sweden during the early sixties’, differentiating this from the first wave of concrete poetry in the 1950s. Williams, Emmett, An Anthology of Concrete Poetry, (New York: Something Else, 1967), p. vii.
(2) Bean, Victoria, Chris McCabe, Kenneth Goldsmith, and Robert Montgomery, The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century, (London: Hayward Gallery, 2015).
(3) ‘The fairly severe limitations of the adana have been a continuing influence on my poetry, as confining and empowering as, let’s say, the haiku or the sonnet.’, Clark, Thomas A. ‘An Inconspicuous Green Flower’ in Bevis, John, Certain trees: the constructed book, poem and object 1964-2006 (Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, France: Centre des livres d’artistes, 2006). p.143.

Dr. Michael Asbury
Haroldo de Campos’ notion of ‘Transcriation’ and the time of art history
This paper draws on the notion of ‘transcriation’ and its relation to poetic writings beyond (but not altogether excluding) the problem of translation within concrete poetry.
Haroldo de Campos responded to works by Helio Oiticica by referring to Ezra Pound’s translation of a Japanese Noh theatre play, the Hagoromo (The Feathered Mantle), as well as the 19th century proto-modernist narrative poem O Guesa Errante (1877) by Joaquim Sousândrade. For Oiticica, the poet’s conjunction invoked further associations, namely with Mallarme’s ‘Un Coup de Des’ and Malevitch’s ‘White on White’, which manifested themselves respectively in films such as ‘Agripina e Roma Manhattan’ and in installation projects such as the Magic Square series. Transcriation thus becomes a means of reconsidering Oiticica’s so-called turn to transmedia which uproots his work from the genealogy of concrete/neococoncrete art placing it under the umbrella of conceptual art.

This example, as limited and specific as it may be, demonstrates nevertheless that the disjunctive temporalities present within the work of contemporary art may far exceed the scope of the consensual time of art history. This complex and transnational matrix of historical references invokes in these works of art hopefully serves to demonstrate the limitations of discourses based on stylistic precedence and more recent proposals purporting the advent of global-art movements such as global conceptualism, ‘other primary structures’, global-pop and so forth.

Dr. Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação
(Re-)interpretations and (mis-)readings: Brazilian, English and Scottish exchanges
The objective of this paper is to examine the dialogue between the Concrete Poets in Brazil and the United Kingdom. The term “Concrete” is generally applied to a variety of artistic movements that followed the post-war frustration with traditional forms of art. Part of a collective search for new artistic materials, Concrete Poetry is the product of two traditions that emerged in the fifties, one of the Bolivian-born Swiss writer, Eugene Gomringer, and the other the Brazilian Noigandres group formed by Haroldo de Campos, Augusto de Campos and Décio Pignatari. Through a productive dialogue, Gomringer and Noigandres brought together these two distinctive artistic projects and disseminated the movement worldwide. Through the analysis of the private exchange of letters, journals, books and artistic objects between Brazilian and British Concrete Poets, more specifically Ian Hamilton Finlay and Edwin Morgan, I wish to shed some light on the cultural and artistic reception of the movement in the United Kingdom. I also wish to argue that this personal form of distribution generated major changes in the poetics of Concrete Poetry as a whole.
Jasmin Wrobel

Transtemporal and trans-spatial dialogues in Haroldo de Campos’ ‘Galáxias’ Latein Amerika Institute – Freie Universität Berlin In the short metatext “dois dedos de prosa sobre uma nova prosa” which accompanies the publication of the first fragments of Galáxias in the literary journal Invenção in 1964, the Brazilian concrete poet Haroldo de Campos defines his book project as a work where “tudo [é] anônimo”, but “personalíssimo” (Campos 1964: 112-113). Indeed, the book reflects the Haroldian cosmos and comprises not only his literary predilections and theoretical interests, but also his journeys and encounters between 1959 and 1976. In my presentation, I would like to illustrate some of the text’s facets that interact on a synchronic level in the “umbigodomundolivro”/”naveloftheworldbook” Galáxias. I intend to emphasize the transtemporal and transpatial poetic mappings and the world literary dialogue in the polyphonic fragments. In a second step, I would like to show in how far the book can also be read as a poetic “Zeitzeugnis”/testimony of the 20th century.

Dr. Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

Concrete poetry and music: connections and counterpoints This presentation will highlight the relations between concrete poetry and music. Focusing on the dialogues between compositional procedures of contemporary music and poetics of concrete poetry, the idea is to hermeneutically analyse how these were of mutual influence, especially observing musical aesthetics of the XX century, such as Serialism, Dodecaphonism and Concrete music. Some examples will be discussed and some Brazilian concrete poetry and popular music will be more comprehensively analysed.

Prof. Stephen Bann
Keynote – Concrete poetry: Then and now
Ian Hamilton Finlay’s decision not to contribute to John Sharkey’s projected anthology of concrete poetry in 1970 marked an irreversible step in his development as a poet and artist. Fundamental differences which separated his approach from that of the London-based poets had come to the fore. This paper will consider two aspects of the poetic experiment of the period that seem relevant today in the light of this disaffiliation. I will look at the conspectus of externally sited works produced for the Brighton Festival of April 1967 – which took place just half a century ago, and also involved staff and students of Chelsea College of Art in a major way. I will also examine how Finlay’s production of folding cards from that period onwards continued to extend the range and potentiality of the concrete poem.

Exchanges between Sol LeWitt and Jeffrey Isaac in Spoleto, Italy, and New York and Chester, Connecticut US

Sol LeWitt and Jeffrey Isaac were neighbours and friends in New York, USA and also in Spoleto, Umbria, Italy. This display documents Sol LeWitt wall drawing 806# in Isaac’s collection and shows a few of the special collection and library’s holdings of Sol LeWitt books. LeWitt publications displayed are ‘100 Cubes’, ‘Autobiography’, Artforum October 1981, ‘Four Basic Kinds of Lines & Colour’, ‘Lines & Color’, and ‘PhotoGrids’. Also showing are Jeffrey Isaac’s imprint, PIM (Public Illumination Magazine) the smallest magazine of its kind.

Jeffrey Isaac met Sol LeWitt through Printed Matter, the artists bookshop in New York that was founded by LeWitt and Lucy Lippard amongst others. He came into the shop with copies of PIM. LeWitt and Isaac were neighbours in New York and in Spoleto, Italy, where LeWitt lived from the mid 1980s for several years, thereafter returning for 3-6 months each year. Isaac moved to Spoleto in 1986 where he has since lived permanently. The two formed a close friendship and had an on going dialogue. This display brings their publications together – for the first time in London. Coincidentally Isaac studied for a year at Camberwell in 1975-76 in the painting department when he made a series of works spanning across London, notably a series of lines in various sites including the National Gallery and Trafalgar Square.

Jeffrey Isaac will be speaking about his work with Jo Melvin in the Green Room at Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street, SW1P 4JU on January 31 2017, at 4.45.

The display is arranged by Jo Melvin, Reader in Fine Art, Archives and Special Collections

 

The Millbank Atlas

21 – 28 January 2017, Monday – Saturday, 10 – 4  

Cookhouse Gallery, Chelsea College of Arts

Curated Conversation on the evening of 20 January 2016, 5 – 8
Interactive Mapping on 24 January, 11 – 4
Finnisage / Closing event on 26 January, 5 – 8
everyone welcome

Interior and Spatial Design and Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School are delighted to join forces for an exhibition and public events programme exploring the lived experience of Millbank

The Millbank Atlas is a collaborative project that brings together researchers, students and local residents to trace the neighbourhood of Chelsea College of Arts. Students of BA Interior and Spatial Design’s Studio 07 have used practice-based research to create maps and other cartographic experiments that identify distinguishing characteristics of this part of London. At stake here is a better understanding of Millbank as comprised of reciprocal relations between the College and surrounding businesses, residential blocks, civil society groups, transportation links and other amenities, infrastructure and further aspects of this built and natural environment.

This exhibition of The Millbank Atlas is cocurated by Dr Marsha Bradfield and Shibboleth Shechter and will showcase an ongoing community relationship that Shechter established with Millbank local Wilfried Rimensberger in 2014.

The Millbank Atlas is made possible thanks to generous support from Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School.

TRANSIENT SPACES | Lecture Series

The Spaces and Narrations Research Group, in collaboration with Wayward, the Interior and Spatial Design Programme Practitioners-in-Residence, present an open lecture series to accompany the Transient Social Environments symposium on Saturday 11 March 2017

Monday 16 January 2017
HEATHER RING AND TOM KENDALL: WAYWARD
http://www.wayward.co.uk/ 

Monday 23 January 2017
HOLLY LEWIS: WE MADE THAT
http://www.wemadethat.co.uk/

Monday 30 January 2017
OLIVIU LUGOJAN-GHENCIU
http://olgv.net/

Monday 06 February 2017
BEN CAMPKIN
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/urbanlab/people/ben-campkin

Monday 13 February 2017
differencEngine
http://differencengine.co.uk/about/

Monday 20 February 2017
JE AHN: STUDIO WEAVE
http://www.studioweave.com/

Monday 27 February 2017
PAUL SMYTH: SOMETHING & SON
http://somethingandson.com/

Monday 27 February 2017
JANE BRODIE
http://jane-brodie.co.uk/

All ISD OPEN LECTURES start at 6:00 pm
Lecture Theatre, Chelsea College of Arts, Atterbury Street Entrance Millbank, London, SW1P 4JU
More information here: www.baisd.wordpress.com

Image courtesy of Wayward.

Call For Papers | Architecture and Culture Journal Special Issue

Architecture and Culture Journal Special Issue…

Behind the Scenes: Anonymity and the Hidden Mechanisms of Design and Architecture

DEADLINE EXTENDED to 27th February 2017
Behind the Scenes: Anonymity and the Hidden Mechanisms of Design and Architecture
Architecture and Culture, Vol. 6, Issue no. 1, March 2018. Editor: Jessica Kelly

Contributions sought from a wide range of practices and disciplines to interrogate the hidden, the intangible and the anonymous in design and architecture. Contributions that consider alternative forms to the conventional academic essay, including the visual and verbal are encouraged.

Contributions might address, but are not limited to, the following themes:

–       Design and anonymity in various contexts such as production, patent and copyright
–       Collective Practices and collaborative dynamics: Design teams, creativity and authorship
–       Networks – public and private, personal and professional
–       Non-masculinist/Feminist perspectives on design production
–       Spaces of production
–       Non-expert producers
–       Inter-disciplinary practices
–       Alternative modes of discourse: orality, non-verbal communication
–       Global perspectives on design practices and discourses

Contributions can range from short observations or manifestos, creative pieces, or visual essays, to longer academic articles. Architecture and Culture is published in both on-line and hard-copy formats: there is capacity to host on-line contributions that operate in a different way to paper-based work.

For author instructions, please go to ‘Instructions for Authors’ at
http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rfac20&page=instructions#.VzRvBmN7BHg

Upload submissions at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/archcult/
Or via ‘submit online’ at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rfac

If you have any queries or require further information, please contact:
Jessica Kelly [email protected]

Editorial Information
This issue is guest edited by Jessica Kelly

Image: Rudolph, Paul, , Architect. [Paul Rudolph’s architectural office in Manhattan. Man stepping across file cabinet tops among elevated drafting stations]. [Ca, 1965] Image. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2010649573. (Accessed May 23, 2016.)

DeSForM 2017: Sense and Sensitivity

 

10th Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement

October 17-18 Delft, October 19-20 Eindhoven, The Netherlands

desformx.org

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

Submission Deadlines:

– Papers (Full / Short / Demos): February 10, 2017

– Workshops connecting research and practice: April 21, 2017

DESIGN AND SEMANTICS OF FORM AND MOVEMENT – 10th EDITION

This year we celebrate the 10th edition of the DeSForM conference series. In 2005 DeSForM was born in (Eindhoven) the Netherlands with the premise of creating meaning through objects, interactions and people. Over the years, the DeSForM community has explored and designed objects through a multisensorial approach always aiming at enriching users’ experiences with them. Throughout previous editions we have seen the development from digital and mechanical objects that had enriched sensorial presence to adaptive and intelligent objects that feel almost analogous to reality given their increased information processing power and sensory resolution. These are thanks to the recent developments in the material sciences, robotics, information and sensor technology, and improved production techniques. Consequently, the arena that belongs to design researchers and practitioners has gotten more sophisticated by being more technical, but also raises new questions regarding the effect and the impact of the new technologically rich designs. In 2017, DeSForM is returning to its place of birth opening up to a broader audience with deeper insights to debate about the future of dynamic “form” giving and its effects on people and their environment. The conference will be hosted by the industrial design schools of TU Delft and TU Eindhoven.

For the 10th edition, DeSForM will bring you the best Dutch design can offer in collaboration with Design United and Philips Design. Prior to the conference on October 17, business cases will be organized in Delft with leading Dutch design consultancies. Furthermore, participants will have a chance to experience the Dutch Design Week 2017 in EIndhoven, which starts right after the conference on October 21. This international event hosts exhibitions from a great variety of schools, companies and designers.

DeSForM is an intimate, single-track conference that brings together design researchers, practitioners, students, and companies to have in-depth discussions over ongoing projects. It is an excellent platform for making new connections and bridging research interests. Therefore, we warmly invite multidisciplinary perspectives and discussions on current issues addressed in design research. Join us in Delft and Eindhoven and experience the rich and extensive design research and practice tradition that skillfully combines social sciences, arts and engineering to stimulate design-driven innovations!

Accepted submissions of all types will be included in the InTechOpen digital library proceedings. Selected publications will be invited to adapt their publication using the input and discussion during the conference for a special book series that represent and demonstrate the best of design research and practices.

DeSForM 2017

Everyday life offers a range of ordinary to rich experiences facilitated by designed artefacts. There is satisfaction when design contributes to a world full of recognizable objects and familiar experiences, and there is certainly excitement and maybe anxiety when design brings in the ‘new’. Technological developments (discoveries and inventions of bronze, iron, steam, electricity, plastics, computing, connectivity etc.) have always shaken up everyday life. Adapting to change is inevitable as humanity has been reinventing itself in accordance with every technological development. At DeSForM 2017, we are looking for a discussion on how designers deal with some of the challenges that come with this adaptation.

Adaptation to Interactive Technologies

Interactive technologies such as actuators, sensors, chips, lights, smart materials but also social robots and virtual reality, offer a specific challenge that humanity has not faced before. The design of interactive, responsive, and self-evolving artefacts and environments challenges the physical understanding of people’s surroundings and their skills to adapt to it. More than ever before, technologies create a gap between the human senses and the understanding of what is (being) sensed. Therefore, the senses are not to be trusted as much as one was used to. Novel products, interactions, and experiences naturally emerge and question the way users make sense of novelty and interpret its effect on them.

The Perceptual and Experiential Gap

This gap opens up new avenues for designers and researchers to explore the enhanced domain of experience design. First, by exploring the new definition of satisfaction in the realm of novelty. Next, and maybe more exciting, by exploring how the gap can be used to generate new ways of interacting with, interpreting and creating an intriguing new world rather than a mundane one. As a creative community we have reached a crunch point where we are able to shape the future of product, interaction and experience design in an exciting way. Thus, it has become possible to envision a world where people are intrigued by design, have dialogue with designed artefacts, or artefacts that have discussions with other objects. These encounters will move people in surprising ways. The natural design habitat enriches people’s sensory repertoire and deepens the meanings attached to artefacts allowing for, for example, poetry, reciprocity and seduction in relation to designed objects.

Developing Sensitivity

Sensitivity is no longer about ‘knowing the world’ but about ‘being in the world’ and exploring it. This means that people need to continuously adapt to a changing world and give meaning to it in a creative way. The sensitivity of the mind is grounded in the sensitivity of the senses. The question becomes: how do people develop this new sensitivity and how do we design for it? Understanding the process of adaptation sheds light on the working of human body and mind. We are able to tackle sensory and cognitive capacity of users using the knowledge, tools and methods we have been acquiring and building over the years. Designing for sensitivity using these new approaches should result in the creation of unprecedented experiences as well as the envisioning and demonstration of interactive futures.

Design Application Domains

DeSForM explores the range of design from its fundamentals to its application domains. Although technology may challenge people to adapt to all domains of our everyday life, DeSForM 2017 especially calls for examples and initiative in the realm of:

  • Care for our Health
  • Sustainable Well-being
  • Smart and Connected Environments
  • Future of Mobility

SUGGESTED TOPICS

We invite to submit high-quality original contributions that face the issue of designing artefacts that explore new materials and technologies (both tangible and virtual) and give rise to innovative interactive forms. The following topics are of particular interest for DeSForM 2017. However, research works addressing more general issues on the topic of meaning, semantics and aesthetics of smart, dynamic and interactive products or systems, are appropriate for the conference:

  • Aesthetics of Interaction
  • Affective Computing
  • Choreography of Interaction
  • Co-creation
  • Tools and Methods for Designing with and for the Senses
  • Design with Interactive Materials
  • Experience-driven Design
  • Generative Design
  • Haptic Interfaces
  • Multisensory Research and Design
  • Senses and Sensors
  • Sensory Experiences (Especially the Tactile, Auditory, Olfactory and Gustatory senses)
  • Tangible Interfaces
  • Wearable Technologies

 

 

PAPERS

Papers should be between 2000 and 4000 pages long. Full papers (2000 – 4000 words) address empirical studies, theoretical stand points or literature reviews. Short papers (2000 – 2500 words) describe raison d’être, design process, product description, audio-visual material or activities with participants.

Authors must use the InTech template and submit as a Word or Word compatible file to prepare the manuscripts. PDF’s can be used for the review process. But the camera ready versions must be a Word or Word compatible file.

All papers will undergo a standardized (double-blind) review and publication process. Length must match the contribution, and the same general criteria hold for all papers. Regardless of length, a paper may be presented as a talk, demo and/or poster. All work must be submitted electronically via the DeSForM 2017 easychair conference site at: easychair.org/. During submission, authors may propose the presentation format that they feel best suits their contribution, which may include multiple presentation forms. The available formats include:

  • Talk
  • Demo
  • Poster

Please do consider the most appropriate presentation format for your work. In particular we stimulate high quality demonstrators. When submitting your contribution, we want to emphasize that providing a supplementary short video (maximum 2 minutes) for demonstrators will allow the reviewers to evaluate the quality of their design work.

High quality demonstrators will be considered for exhibition at the Dutch Design Week Eindhoven (21-29 October 2017), an event following the DeSForM conference, hosting 2.500 exhibitors and almost 300.000 visitors. This is a unique opportunity provided only for DeSForM participants!

All presentation formats will be included in the conference proceedings and high-quality ones will be considered for an adapted version for the special book series.

WORKSHOPS CONNECTING RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

DeSForM 2017 will host up to five parallel (half)day workshops on Friday October 20. The aim for these workshops is to translate theoretical perspectives / tools / methods / materials from (design) research to practice. We are interested in workshops that try to explore novel approaches to interaction and holistic experiences involving all our senses and sensitivities in everyday contexts. We encourage workshops to explore applications in healthcare domains. Furthermore, we encourage contributors to seek inspiration in the themes of the conference. The workshops will be organized at the High-Tech Campus Philips Design offices.

 

A more detailed call for the workshop  submissions will be included in DeSForM second call for papers, expected at the beginning of March 2017. Please keep an eye on desformx.org for updates.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES

  • Papers: February 10, 2017
  • Workshops: April 21, 2017

All work must be submitted electronically via the DeSForM 2017 easychair conference site at:

easychair.org/

CONTACT

[email protected]

 

Conference | FROM CODEX TO CODE | Ligatus Research Centre

Ten years of research by graduates of the

Ligatus Research Centre

We invite you to celebrate with us the 10th Anniversary of the Ligatus Research Centre at the CCW Graduate School with a conference at which our first seven PhD and M.Phil graduates will present papers about their current research interests.

The conference will take place on Friday, 24th February, from 10am to 6pm, in Banqueting Hall of the Chelsea College of Arts and Design, University of the Arts London, John Islip Street, SW1P 4JU and it will be followed by a reception.

Tickets for the conference will be available from January 2017

SPEAKERS:

Georgios Boudalis
(Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki)
The birth of the codex and the crafts of Late Antiquity

Alberto Campagnolo
(Library of Congress, Washington)
The digital representation of books as objects: from cultural objects to digital cultural objects

Anna Gialdini
(University of the Arts London)
Luxury, Hybridism, and the Strange Greekness of Some Florentine Bindings

Theresa Zammit Lupi
(The Notarial Archives, Valletta, Malta)
On the parchment trail: following music manuscripts from Malta

Heather Ravenberg
(Saint Catherine Foundation)
Documentation schemas for recording conservation activity

Martha Romero
(Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)
From research to practice

Nikolas Sarris
(National Library of Greece, Athens, Thesaurus-Islamicus project, Cairo)
The Ligatus Condition Assessment Form: a tool for training, studio workflows and surveys: Experiences from Iraq, Ethiopia and Egypt

 

For more information about Ligatus please visit www.ligatus.org.uk