Category Archives: Partnerships

Horniman Museum Art, Design and Natural History Fellowship 2017-2020

Fellowship Opportunity

Camberwell, Chelsea Wimbledon Graduate School would like to invite all research active staff on 0.2 or above contract to submit proposal for a new Fellowship with the Horniman Museum and Gardens. Please find attached a brief and application form for The Horniman Museum Art, Design and Natural History Fellowship 2017-2020. This fellowship is part of an exciting new cultural partnership between Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School and The Horniman Museum and Garden Trust.

The Fellowship will focus on developing new ways the Horniman Museum can use their Natural History collections and displays to “communicate and encourage audiences to gain a deeper understanding of the global environmental changes and challenges affecting the natural world (the science, the impact and implications for us all).

To apply please download and read the brief below and fill in the application form (below). Please email your application to Abby Viner [email protected]  by 5pm on Friday 16 June 2017

Application Form…

The Horniman Museum Fellowship application form 2017  Horniman Museum Fellowship brief 2017

Brief…

Horniman Museum Fellowship brief 2017

Transpersonal: Elizabeth A. Povinelli

8 Feb 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £5.00 Book Tickets

Elizabeth A. Povinelli is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University where she has also been the Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Law and Culture. She is the author of numerous books and essays as well as a former editor of the academic journal Public Culture.

Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an “anthropology of the otherwise”. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and three films with the Karrabing Film Collective including Wutharr, The Saltwater, 2016 which premiered at Sydney Biennale and was winner of the 2015 European Visible Award.

This lecture is the fourth in a series entitled Transpersonal: art and life directives, ten lectures which will engage with the production of psychotechnologies, socio-political awareness and art and design practices in an automated reality. Each lecture will explore the ways in which the term transpersonal relays states of consciousness that go beyond the limits of personal identity.

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: Karrabing Film Collective, Wutharr: Saltwater Dreams, 2016.

The Millbank Atlas

21 – 28 January 2017, Monday – Saturday, 10 – 4  

Cookhouse Gallery, Chelsea College of Arts

Curated Conversation on the evening of 20 January 2016, 5 – 8
Interactive Mapping on 24 January, 11 – 4
Finnisage / Closing event on 26 January, 5 – 8
everyone welcome

Interior and Spatial Design and Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School are delighted to join forces for an exhibition and public events programme exploring the lived experience of Millbank

The Millbank Atlas is a collaborative project that brings together researchers, students and local residents to trace the neighbourhood of Chelsea College of Arts. Students of BA Interior and Spatial Design’s Studio 07 have used practice-based research to create maps and other cartographic experiments that identify distinguishing characteristics of this part of London. At stake here is a better understanding of Millbank as comprised of reciprocal relations between the College and surrounding businesses, residential blocks, civil society groups, transportation links and other amenities, infrastructure and further aspects of this built and natural environment.

This exhibition of The Millbank Atlas is cocurated by Dr Marsha Bradfield and Shibboleth Shechter and will showcase an ongoing community relationship that Shechter established with Millbank local Wilfried Rimensberger in 2014.

The Millbank Atlas is made possible thanks to generous support from Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School.

Transpersonal: Susan Kelly | Micropolitics: Practices of Freedom and Rehabilitation

25 Jan 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £6.00 Book Tickets

Micropolitics: Practices of Freedom and Rehabilitation

This lecture, the third in the Transpersonal series, explores what we can learn from terrorist rehabilitation programmes about the relationship between micropolitics and subjectivity, practices of freedom, and the psychic spaces of the (ethno) state today.

From the late 1990s the Egyptian, Yemeni and Saudi Arabian governments developed a series of programmes that sought to ‘rehabilitate’ jihadists as part of broader counterterrorism measures. ‘Jihadi Rehab’ camps employ clerics and scholars to engage in theological debates with prisoners, and provide counselling, education, sports and practical training. Their aim is to re-orientate prisoners toward the family and the private sphere, and to re-programme subjects who are non-violent and accept the legitimacy of the state. Such practices of ‘rehabilitation’ have a long history under British colonialism, and provide us with fascinating blueprints of explicit programmes for the un-making and re-making of political subjects.

The Mau Mau Rehabilitation Camps in Kenya in the 1950s for example, also claimed to transform Kikuyu inmates into loyal and productive citizens. Working with colonially educated ethno-psychiatrists, they attempted to ‘de-programme’ fighters through performative ‘counter-oaths’ that would free the individual from the group. In these contexts, technologies of the self and micropolitical processes are employed not as practices of freedom as thinkers such as Foucault and Fanon conceived of them, but are rather used to consolidate racist and pseudo-medical notions of normalization and submission – coded as ‘cure’.

Susan Kelly is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Her research looks at relationships between art and micropolitics, technologies of the self, space and practices of organisation. She works in the context of various collectives and individually in time-based work, installation and through writing, publishing and convening events and performative/ militant investigations.

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: A still from the British Pathé Newsreel: The Lari Massacre 1953 and the capture of Dedan Kimathi, 1956 

Transpersonal: Gilda Williams | The Tao of Warhol, and Other Tales

18 Jan 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £6.00 Book Tickets

 This talk by Gilda Williams is an experiment in examining the art and life of artists from a spiritual perspective, from Andy Warhol to Amalia Ulman. The lecture is the second in a series of responses to the theme ‘transpersonal’, which relays states of consciousness that go beyond the limits of personal identity. This may include peak and spiritual experiences such as near death phenomena and the expansion of awareness beyond the usual remits of individuality, which may be brought on by experiences of crisis related to the spiritual, ethical and relational extremes of contemporary life.

Gilda Williams is a writer and art critic who teaches on the MFA Curating programme, Goldsmiths. Her most recent book is ON&BY Andy Warhol (MIT/Whitechapel Press, 2016). She has also authored How to Write about Contemporary Art (Thames & Hudson, 2014). Williams is a London correspondent for Artforum magazine and a member of the International Association of Art Critics. She was Editor and Commissioning Editor (from 1997) for Contemporary Art at Phaidon Press 1994-2005, where she commissioned the ‘Contemporary Artists’ monographs, ‘Themes and Movements’ series of anthologies, and other books including Salon to Biennale: Exhibitions that Made Art History (2008).

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: ON&BY Andy Warhol by Gilda Williams (MIT/Whitechapel Press, 2016)

Interview with PhD Annabel Dover | Artist in Residence at The British School at Athens

Original article by Sarah McLean for the Chelsea Blog, see entire interview here…Chelsea Blog

Practice-based PhD student Annabel Dover has been announced as the first recipient of a new award founded by the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School with the The British School at Athens (BSA). The award comprises of a new arts residency in Greece, supported by a bursary and with studio and accommodation provided, which Annabel will undertake from 13 March – 31 May this year.

While in Greece, Annabel will look at Athens through the prism of her own personal narrative, engaging with the BSA research theme of building the archive. She will offer an introductory lecture at the School at the start of her residency and host an open studio event while resident.  She will also offer a lecture at UAL on returning from the residency.

The BSA, founded in 1886, maintains facilities in Athens which include the Director’s house (with meeting rooms and a recently-created artist’s studio in the roof space); the Hostel, housing a specialist library, archive, museum, accommodation, a common room, kitchen, dining room, and administration; a Hostel Annexe; the Assistant Director’s apartment; and the Marc and Ismene Fitch Laboratory for science-based archaeology. The BSA has a relaxed atmosphere enabling researchers to cross-fertilise among their own different fields of interest, as well as to develop links with local practitioners and researchers.

We spoke to Annabel about her work and her plans for the Residency.

Please tell us about your plans for the British School at Athens Residency – what do you hope to achieve? How will this relate to your current work? What attracted you to apply for it?
I’m so  looking forward to having a bed close to a studio and being able to focus on being in the studio and being immersed in my work all of the time. Unless I’m working towards a show I am not very good at making work. Neil Cummings [Professor of Practice and Theory of Fine Art in the Graduate School] talks about there already being too much stuff in the world and I feel I don’t really want to add to it! My PhD research came from and was developed by the practice and I would love to make more practical experiments.

Work from The Psychopathology of Everyday Life by Annabel Dover. Watercolour on paper and porcelain.

Work from The Psychopathology of Everyday Life by Annabel Dover. Watercolour on paper and porcelain.

The environment of the BSA is something I’m excited about too: there’s a really great looking museum with artefacts and a seed collection, which sounds magical. I am looking forward to meeting new people and hearing about their research. Athens itself is a fascinating city – the squashed oranges that fall off the trees are something I remember my mother telling me about. The central theme of my research is based on reliving my mother’s trip to Athens in the late 1980s. With this I hope to explore a new way of working.

I’ve looked at biography with my PhD research and the way I’ve tried to inhabit the Victorian photographer Anna Atkins. I also want to make work about how it feels to be away from ‘home’ and relate that to other ‘explorers’ such as Marianne North. I’m looking forward to having the freedom to make a record of emotional encounters in Athens.

I like the city of Athens and I feel I have only experienced it superficially, so it will be great to be there for three months. Last time I was there I saw a wild tortoise in the plants at the base of the Acropolis. It was very exciting seeing an (ancient) living thing inhabiting an ancient monument.

 

 

Transpersonal: art and life directives | ICA/UAL Lecture Series

The term transpersonal relays states of consciousness that go beyond the limits of personal identity, this may include peak and spiritual experiences such as near death phenomena
and the expansion of awareness beyond the usual remits of individuality.

Transpersonal, art and life directives – is a series of ten lectures that engage with the production of psychotechnologies, socio- political consciousness and art and design practices in an automated reality. It looks at hands-on contribution, belonging, profiling, and ownership of institutions that are continuously reinvented, opening up the potential for a new flux of intrapersonal encounters. Transpersonal, art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson in collaboration with the ICA and the postgraduate community at Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts, London.

To book tickets: ica.org.uk
Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

January 2017
18 Gilda Williams
25 Susan Kelly

February 2017
8 Elizabeth A.Povinelli
15 Rizvana Bradley
22 Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen

March 2017
8 Elizabeth Jochum
15 Lina Dzuverovi ´c
22 Kerstin Stakemeier
29 Choy Ka Fai

Announcement | Jocelyn Herbert Post Doctoral Research Fellow

The University of the Arts London and the National Theatre Archive are proud to announce the appointment of post doctoral research fellow Dr Eleanor Margolies. This unique collaboration between the National Theatre and UAL, supported by the Rootstein Hopkins Foundation, will support the NT in expanding the reach of the Jocelyn Herbert Archive, which is now housed in the NT’s Archive, to the widest possible audience. Workshops, visits and talks will encompass schools, colleges and the general public raising the profile of theatre design and the crucial role designers play in the production process.

Dr. Margolies whose recent publication PROPS, part of the Palgrave Readings in Theatre Practice Series, is an important point of reference for students and researchers will be working with Erin Lee, Archivist at the National Theatre and Professors Eileen Hogan and Jane Collins at UAL.

In addition to the outreach work, Dr Margolies will also be conducting her own research in the Jocelyn Herbert Archive looking at the legacy of this important 20thcentury designer for 21st century practice. This fellowship consolidates the close links already established between the National Theatre and UAL through events like the Jocelyn Herbert Lecture Series, the annual involvement of MA Curating and Collections at Chelsea with the archive and two weeks of intensive research by BA Theatre Design students from Wimbledon College of Arts.

 

CCW Graduate School and CCC/HEAD: Sustainability, Resilience and Divestment

In the past year CCW Graduate School and CCC/HEAD in Geneva have been developing a partnership between staff and students. From 10-13 November students and staff from Geneva came to London for the first collaborative sessions. David Cross, Reader in Fine Art and Graphic Design, is leading CCW’s side of the partnership and wrote about the recent visit.

‘The aim of this partnership is to compare and contrast our approaches to the emerging field of practice-based research degrees. Rather than approach this in a generic way, we decided to develop a specific focus on the research interests we have in common. Some shared research interests are a critical engagement with the contested ideal of “sustainability” and the problematic notion of “resilience”… The production of situated knowledge through action research and radical pedagogy… And of course, the central importance of artistic practice as an intersection of content, form and process.

When I was asked to lead a collaboration between CCW and CCC, I imagined a regular institutional exchange, and I expected my rusty French to be put to the test. But when we connected between London and Geneva via Skype, it was clear that communication wasn’t going to be a problem — our Swiss collaborators’ English was better than mine! Even better, from the moment our collaborators from Geneva arrived, our interaction was more sociable, creative and unpredictable than I had hoped. We began with an introductory show-and-tell session of research by staff, led by Professor Catherine Quéloz (CCC/HEAD) and Professor Liliane Schneiter (CCC/HEAD); and by PhD candidates Aurélien Gamboni (CCC/HEAD), Janis Schroeder (CCC/HEAD), Joana de Oliveira (CCC/HEAD), Manoela Afonso (CCW), Karel Sidney Doing (LCC), and Vanessa Saraceno (CCW). After this, our wide-ranging and critical dialogue was so absorbing and challenging that spontaneous action began to change the plan.

That evening, we went to Wimbledon for the launch of the new “sustainable” studio building by the architects Penoyre and Prasad, and the award of a Soil Association Gold Catering Mark to Baxter Storey, the caterers at UAL. We had been invited to announce the collaboration between CCC and CCW, but the computer stubbornly refused to show the presentations we had prepared. Faced with a blank screen, I invited the audience to participate in the work of picturing sustainability as a paradoxical and ambiguous idea, an urgent challenge that distracts us with technical problems when cultural transformation is the goal. Completely undeterred by the technical failure, our partners from Geneva stepped up to give a delightful collaborative speech performance that described their research interests while demonstrating their shared values of collectivity and participation.

The next day, we visited the inspirational MayDay Rooms in Fleet Street, a “safe haven for historical material linked to social movements, experimental culture and the radical expression of marginalised figures and groups”. Co-founders Anthony Davies and Iain Boal generously hosted us, and presented the collections of radical material held in the archive. I think we were all impressed by the elegant architecture, but what really inspired us was the MayDay Rooms’ ambition of going beyond critical engagement to activation — handling the historical archive material and interacting with the people who produced it, in order to energise current struggles.

Our final day together was to be devoted to a seminar. Before their visit to Chelsea, I had corresponded with Professor Quéloz to agree the choice of material. I proposed, The Three Ecologies by Félix Guattari, which identifies the compound ecological, social and psychological nature of the crisis. Catherine and her colleagues came back with, How Big is Big? by Peter Sloterdijk, which considers the revolutionary implications of Buckminster Fuller’s identification of the earth as a spaceship, and Mike Davis, Who Will Build the Ark?, which offers a thrilling image of a “mental tournament between analytic despair and utopian possibility”. We also planned to discuss artworks: Hans Haacke’s Rhinewater Purification Plant (1972) in relation to Olafur Eliasson’s Weather Project (2003-4), and Ursula Biemann’s video piece, Deep Weather (2013).

But the group was keen to pursue the ideas sketched out in our introductory session and developed at the MayDay Rooms, so rather than use our seminar to discuss artworks and writing, we discussed our options for action. Encouraged by the sense of shared possibility coming from our time together, I outlined my aim of persuading UAL to switch banks away from Royal Bank of Scotland —the fossil fuel bank— and to put our money with a bank that supports our aim of becoming a more sustainable university. Our fellow researchers from Geneva were really supportive, and went so far as to propose making divestment from fossil fuels a focus of our future collaboration. Geneva is home to an extraordinary network of financial institutions and international civil society organizations, so with creative and critical input, it seems we could make something exciting happen.

The collaboration between CCW in London and CCC in Geneva is going ahead: we are planning further meetings at Chelsea, a Skype session from London to Geneva on 27 January, and a visit to Geneva from 9—13 March 2015. If you’d like to get involved, please get in touch!’

Image: in the archives of the MayDay Rooms, photo by Marsha Bradfield

More Than Double Glazing

David Buckland, Director of Cape Farewell (CCW Graduate School partner), will be speaking at More Than Double Glazing, an inspiring international symposium about the innovative opportunities and chances that come with sustainable conduct in the arts at Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam, 11 December.

In 2001 Buckland founded Cape Farewell, focusing on the notion that art can interrogate the future with some semblance of rigour. This has been analysed and researched and become instrumental in facing the challenge of climate change. He has co-curated a number of major climate art exhibitions: Art and Climate Change for the National History Museum, London 2006; Earth for the Royal Society of Arts; U-n-f-o-l-d which has toured worldwide; Carbon 12 for the EDF Foundation Gallery, Paris 2012; Carbon 13 for the Ballroom, Texas 2013; the Carbon 14 exhibition and festival, Toronto 2013/14. Buckland is a designer, artist and film-maker whose lens-based works have been exhibited in numerous galleries in London, Paris and New York and collected by the National Portrait Gallery in London, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Getty Collection in Los Angeles and the Michael Wilson Collection amongst others. Five books of his photographs have been published, including works on the Trojan Wars and The Last Judgment featuring the sculptures of Sir Anthony Caro, and two monographs of his own work. He has designed over 20 stage sets, as well as costumes, for Siobhan Davies Dance, the Royal Ballet, Rambert Dance Company, Second Stride and Compagnie Cré-Ange.

At the symposium speakers and founders of renowned institutes such as Julie’s Bicycle (Alison Tickell) and Cape Farewell will deal with the issue of how the art world can contribute in its own way to a more ecological world. The remarkable projects that these institutes have set up, their policies and the examples they have set across the globe will be discussed in great detail. Ian Rimington of Arts Council England will show how a sustainable attitude has led the institute to apply stimuli and encourage applicants to endorse the policy of sustainability. Artists Arne Hendriks, Yeb Wiersma and Miek Zwamborn will talk about their practices and the role that sustainability plays in them. Guy Gypens of the Kaaitheater in Brussels and coordinator of Imagine 2020 will explain the innovative power of durability in the theatre and its productions. Harmen van der Hoek will expound on the prominence of durability in the programme of Leeuwarden Cultural Capital 2018. The moderator is Tracy Metz.

The full programme can be here and attendees can reserve a place by emailing [email protected].

The symposium is organised by the Jan van Eyck Academie Maastricht and takes place as part of The New Material Award exhibition and prize at Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam.