Category Archives: Events

Symposium: Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting as Model

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
10-6pm, Thursday 21 June 2018

Yve-Alain Bois’ seminal text Painting as Model, published in 1993, is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being both a conceptual and a material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

Speakers:

Eric Alliez

Philip Armstrong

Jean-Claude Bonne

Matthew Bowman

Alberto Condotta

Moyra Derby

Lisa Florman

The symposium is free and open to all. Booking is essential.

Book your place here: http://bit.ly/painting-as-remodel

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

 

 

Yve-Alain Bois: What’s with the bamboo stick? Matisse’s late drawing practice

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
6-8pm, Wednesday 20 June 2018

In a photograph dating from 1931, Matisse is shown sketching The Dance—a gigantic mural commissioned by Albert Barnes for his Foundation in Merion—with his charcoal at the end of a six-foot bamboo stick. This unusual practice stems from the artist’s discovery, dating from the time he was working on another work now in the Barnes Foundation, his 1906 Bonheur de vivre, that squaring up a small sketch, as has been the standard procedure for large paintings and murals since at least the Renaissance, was incompatible with his aesthetic. The bamboo stick resurfaces in Matisse’s studio at the end of the 1940s when is he working on his Vence Chapel, his old age further emphasizing the acrobatic nature of the feat, and the amazing control the artist had of his drawing tool. But while Matisse’s use of the cane is consistent with the artist’s creed with regard to two of the chapel’s mural—Saint Dominic and the Virgil and Child—it seems absurd when he dealt with the third mural, the Stations of the Cross, for which each of the fourteen stations were first sketched on individual pieces of paper at their final scale. For Matisse, a picture plane must always be conceived and perceived whole; the piecemeal approach is anathema to him—which is to say that the narrative structure of the Stations of the Cross is entirely contradictory to his aesthetic. Yet the choice of this topic for the Vence Chapel was fully his. What is one to make of such a contradiction? And was Matisse attempting to mask it, or on the contrary to reveal it, by the extraordinary rough manner in which he painted his Stations, a deliberate «primitivism» that has so far prevented Matisse scholars to give a close look at this work.

Yve-Alain Bois is Professor of Art History in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He has written extensively on 20th century art, from Matisse and Picasso, Mondrian and Lissitzky to post-war American art. A collection of his essays, Painting as Model, has been published by M.I.T. Press in 1990. With Benjamin Buchloh, Hal Foster, and Rosalind Krauss, he co-authored Art Since 1900 (Thames and Hudson, 2004). He co-organized the 1994-5 retrospective of Piet Mondrian in The Hague, Washington and New York.  In 1996, he curated the exhibition “L’informe, mode d’emploi” with Rosalind Krauss at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. The book accompanying this exhibition has been published in English under the title Formless: A User’s Guide (Zone Books, 1997). Other exhibitions that he curated include “Matisse and Picasso: A Gentle Rivalry” at the Kimbell Museum of Art (Fort Worth), for which he also wrote the catalogue (Matisse and Picasso, Flammarion, 1998); “Ellsworth Kelly: Early Drawings” at the Fogg Art Museum (Cambridge, Mass), which traveled to five other venues in the US and Europe (March 1999-August 2000);  “Ellsworth Kelly: Tablet,” at the Drawing Center, New York (May-June 2002); and “Picasso Harlequin” (October 2008-February 2009) at the Vittoriano in Rome. Bois is one of the editors of the journal October and a contributing editor of Artforum. Among other projects, he is currently working on the catalogue raisonné of Ellsworth Kelly’s paintings and sculpture, the first volume of which was published by Cahiers d’art (Paris) in 2015. He also edited the catalogue raisonné of Matisse’s paintings in the Barnes Foundation, published in 2015 by Thames and Hudson.
Tickets: £5/3

To book your place for this lecture, please visit: bit.ly/yve-alain-bois

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: Matisse sketching The Dance, The Barnes Collection, 1931.

Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’

Image: Stephen White

An exhibition developed by Trish Scott, who has just been awarded a PhD from Chelsea College of Arts, has just under two weeks left to run at Turner Contemporary in Margate.

Journeys with “The Waste Land” is an exhibition exploring resonances between the visual arts and T.S. Eliot’s complex and influential poem “The Waste Land”, part of which Eliot wrote in Margate before its publication in 1922.

In conjunction with Guest Curator, Professor Mike Tooby, who initiated the exhibition, Trish Scott has been working for the last three years to develop a unique curatorial approach underpinning the genesis of the show, working collaboratively with local residents to co-curate all aspects of the exhibition’s development, resulting in a multi-voiced presentation that echoes the very form of Eliot’s poem.

Image: Jenni Deakin

Debating the poem’s contemporary relevance through the visual arts, the exhibition includes works by over 60 artists ranging from the nineteenth centuries through to present day. Artists represented include J.M.W. Turner, Man Ray, Edward Hopper, Philip Guston and Cy Twombly, with contemporary works by Tacita Dean, Jo Stockham, and Christane Baumgartner.

New works made specifically for the exhibition are also displayed, with contributions from such artists as Tess Denman-Cleaver, Henrik Hakansson, John Newling, Rosalie Schweiker and Emma Talbot.

The exhibition closes on the 7 May, 2018.

Call for Papers – Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting As Model

Yve-Alain Bois’ “Painting as Model” which was Published 1993 is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being a conceptual and material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

To coincide with the Painting as ReModel Conference at Camberwell College of Arts on the  20 & 21 June 2018 and the Journal of Contemporary Painting Special Issue on the subject, we are looking for papers that address ideas and issues that connect to Bois’ Painting As Model.

Abstract Submissions

150 words by April 16th to    academicadminfineart@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

Annabel Dover | The Dream Lives of Objects | 24 Jan 2018

Artist Annabel Dover will talk about her residency at the British School at Athens and our multivalent relationship to objects.

24th January 2018 | Lecture Theatre, Chelsea College of Arts

6pm-8pm

Images – C-type prints – City Plaza Hotel, Series I, II, III, IV, V

For my residency at the British School at Athens I looked at Athens through the prism of personal narratives. When I was 13, my father already gone, my mother left home to live in Athens. She never returned. My research at the British School at Athens focused on the Finlay Museum whilst retracing my mother’s steps in Athens, according to her letters; making drawings, paintings and three-dimensional objects that respond to the leftover human traces I found in these areas. The designer Phillipe Stark remarked that to understand a city you must first look in its rubbish bins. In a series of three-dimensional works, I used the crumbs of gold leaf I found outside the Hotel des Anglais, Syntagma Square, leftover by the hotel’s recent ironwork gilding. I made everyday objects akin to the dice, coins and shells found in the Ancient Athenian Agora Museum, out of Jesmonite and then gilded them with the found gold leaf. I scattered these in the Ancient Agora and photographed them in situ. I made watercolours that take their glittering translucent appearance from a small rock I found in the Ancient Agora. A jeweller in the Plaka, skilled in the art of Lapis Lazuli carving, ground it down for me and I have added it to gum Arabic (from The Acacia Senegal tree, from the Sudan). The Ancient Agora seems so alive with Tortoises, Hoopoes, Swallows and plants that I wanted some of this organic life to become part of my document of Athens. These scraps of the recent past are then woven together to form a new narrative

My chief research focus whilst at the British School at Athens engaged with the school’s research theme of ‘building the archive’. My PhD research focused on presenting an alternative taxonomy. My study of the early photographer Anna Atkins looked at the specimens she presents less as conclusive evidence, more reflecting on them as a starting point to explore her biography. Whilst in Athens I documented accidental artefacts left behind by the people who catalogued the Finlay Museum; items such as an airmail envelope with notes on, or discarded pieces of paper with the item numbers of the potsherds in the collection. I made paintings and drawings of these artefacts alongside the displayed artefacts of the Finlay Museum and presented these works in a loose-leaf album.

I volunteered at City Plaza Hotel, a hotel that went bankrupt in the crash of 2007, now a refugee hostel. I photographed groups of objects belonging to the residents of the hostel: bags of earth brought from their home countries, rose petals they collected and sometimes I collected for them that their mothers put in their bras to make them smell nice, oranges they picked from the trees that grow on the streets of Athens that they ate. Cigar ends that belonged to the rich men of Athens that they dreamt of being. Lucky charms Greek people they met had given to them when they were ill and the toys that became dirty on their long journey to Greece.

My time at the BSA provided me with an overwhelming amount of material that will continue to influence my work in the future. I would particularly like to focus on the wildlife of the Ancient Agora site. I have used humane moth traps in the past and I would be very interested in documenting the moths of the Ancient Athenian Agora, as a metaphor for the life of the city returning after dark. Among the other areas of research, I encountered at the BSA, that I am very interested to follow are: archeological squeezes and the indexical parallels they have with the cyanotype, the works of Piet de Jong and Alice Lidsell’s botanical notebook who was resident at the BSA 1930-31 and whose watercolours are now housed by Newnham College, Cambridge.

 

GRADUATE SCHOOL PUBLIC PROGRAMME | 2017-2018 | SPRING TERM

CAMBERWELL, CHELSEA, WIMBEDON GRADUATE SCHOOL

PUBLIC PROGRAMME 2017-2018 | SPRING TERM


SYMPOSIUM

Shame on You: Theorising shame, pride and community in contemporary culture

Photograph by Christa Holka.

10.00 – 19.00 Friday, 09 February 2018, 

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts 16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU

 Recent advances in ‘equality’ have seen an explosion of pride within the LGBT community but what has been gained and what has been lost by insisting that we are proud to be gay?
In this day-long symposium we will cast light on contemporary manifestations of the relations between shame and stigma, exposure, conformity and power.

This event is convened by Jordan McKenzie, Associate Lecturer, BA Drawing

Camberwell College of Arts, and Akosua Bonsu (Fringe Centre, UCL).

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/shame-on-you-symposium


SYMPOSIUM

Encountering Difference  

Image: Akiko Takizawa, Shadows on the Hill (2009, date printed: 2013). Collotype on Japanese Washi Paper. Courtesy of the artist.        

10.00 – 18.00 Friday, 23 February 2018

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts, 45-65 Peckham Road, London SE5 8UF

Focusing on themes of identity, the visual and non-visual representations of race, gender, sexuality, class, language, power, desire and aesthetics, this one-day symposium, will present the findings from the Difference Goes Speed Dating event, which hosted a series of encounters between artists, students, academics and industry specialists engaged in lens-based media practices. We will discuss current and alternative ways of picturing difference in contemporary lens-based practices and beyond.

This event is convened by Dr Ope Lori, TrAIN Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and BA Fine Art Associate Lecturer at Chelsea College of Arts.

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/encounterdifference


WORKSHOP

Adaptation, Re-make, Risk-taking: Creative intervention in contemporary theatre and performance

Image courtesy: Blind Dinner Date, ZU-UK. http://zu-uk.com/

10.00 – 17.00 Saturday, 03 March 2018

Wimbledon Theatre Space, Wimbledon College of Arts, Merton Hall Road, London SW19 3QA

Adaptation, Re-make, Risk-taking aims to take a fresh look at the reinterpretation of pre-existing sources in contemporary performance, and situates radical intervention as an innovative and risk-taking form of adaptation for the stage.

This event is convened by Dr Jozefina Komporaly, Lecturer in Theatre and Screen Studies at Wimbledon College of Arts.

Very limited amount of tickets available.
Early booking recommended:

http://bit.ly/ZUUK-UAL


AFTERNOON SYMPOSIUM

Speculative Design: Afrofuturist and indigenous projections

Image: Elizabeth La Pensee, She Carries the Water. Courtesy of the artist.

14.00 – 20.00 Friday, 09 March 2018

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU

This afternoon symposium brings together researchers and practitioners whose work engages with the themes of Afrofuturism, Indigenous Futures, and other emerging areas of science-fictional/future-orientated cultural practice in which people of colour, indigenous cultures and non-Western subjects take centre stage.

This event is convened by Dr Dan Smith, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art Theory, Chelsea College of Arts.

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/speculative-design

 

 

BAUHAUS 100: Panel Discussion

3pm – 6.30pm | Friday, 9 June 2017 Wilson Road Hall Camberwell College of Arts 1 Wilson Road SE5 8LU

Join us for a lively panel discussion considering the influence of the Bauhaus on art and design in the UK. We will think and work through ideas and aspects of the Bauhaus pedagogy and consider the ways in which it might relate to the contemporary practices of teaching and art making.

This panel discussion follows two days of intensive workshops led by our international partners from Albers Foundation and Bauhaus Dessau. It is an opportunity for anyone interested to become involved in the first stage of a two-year research and events programme in celebration of the centenary year of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Chair: David Crow, Pro Vice-Chancellor UAL and Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon



Panel members:


Torsten Blume, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation 
Fritz Horstman, Albers Foundation


Jane Collins, Professor of Theatre and Performance, UAL


Daniel Sturgis, Reader and Programme Director Fine Art, Camberwell College of Arts


Tracey Waller, Course Leader BA Graphic Design, Camberwell College of Arts



The discussion takes place from 3pm – 4.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. Free and open to all.
 RSVP to reserve your place: ccw.rsvp@arts.ac.uk . 

In partnership with Bauhaus Dessau and the Albers Foundation.

Ligatus Summer School 2017

Ligatus Research Centre (UAL) are pleased to announce the that registration for our Summer School is now Open.

It will be held on 25-29 September and 2-6 October in Norwich, UK, Cathedral Library

Week 1 (25-29 September): Identifying and Recording Bookbinding Structures of the Eastern Mediterranean 

Tutors: Dr Athanasios Velios and Dr Georgios Boudalis

Week 2 (2-6 October): European Bookbinding, 1450-1830 

Tutor: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad

For more information and registration please visit: http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/node/473

Paul Coldwell in conversation with Christopher Le Brun

Professor Paul Coldwell will be in conversation with the Artist & President of the Royal Academy of Arts, Christopher Le Brun.

Book Tickets

Christopher Le Brun is a painter, sculptor and printmaker, an alumni of Chelsea College of Art and the current President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This conversation will primarily focus on his work in print, the discipline for which he was originally elected to the Royal Academy. His work as a printmaker has been rich and varied, ranging in scale and process from large mural scale monotypes made with Garner and Richard Tullis in Santa Barbara, through to small scale intimate etchings published by Paragon Press with whom he has had a long association. Le Brun’s prints are generally the result of a dedicated period of engagement resulting in series and portfolios of work which explore themes and ideas current in his paintings and sculptures. Notable publications include Seven Lithographs 1989, 50 Etchings 1990, Four Riders 1993, Wagner 1994, Motif Light 1998, Paris Lithographs 2000, Fifty Etchings 2005 and the newly released Seria Ludo woodcuts in 2015.

Paul Coldwell is an artist and Professor in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts. He has written extensively on printmaking, is on the editorial board of the journal Print Quarterly and is a regular contributor to Art in Print for whom he writes regularly. He has curated a number of exhibitions including Morandi’s legacy: Influences on British Art (which included Le Brun) and more recently, The artists’ Folio as a site of Inquiry.

This event is organised by Chelsea College of Arts in partnership with Print Quarterly.

Book Tickets

Jessica Ogden: Still

31-33 Church St, London NW8 8ES

26 May – 23 June 2017 (11.00 – 18.00 Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Private View: Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.00 – 20.00 (RSVP to elliott@aipr.co.uk)

May 2017 sees the opening of an exhibition by Jessica Ogden in London. Entitled Still, it acts as an exploration of Jessica’s work through the static display of archive and current works, alongside a series of workshops. Church Street, Marylebone plays host to the experience, which was born out of a long running conversation between Jessica and Professor Carol Tulloch, writer and curator at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL, who will curate the exhibition. The space is designed by Professor Judith Clark, a London-based curator, who collaborated closely with Jessica.

Born and raised in Jamaica, Jessica began her career in fashion reusing the old to create the new. In 1992, after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Byam Shaw School of Art, she joined Oxfam’s NoLoGo project. Working with donated clothes, Jessica found herself at the forefront of what was then termed customising. The following year Ogden launched her own label using traditional stitching, hand printing and layering techniques and often appropriating old garments such as quilts. Soon after the label’s launch, Ogden staged catwalk shows and presentations as part of London Fashion Week from 1996-2006. Her work continued with cult French label A.P.C., with whom after moving to Paris, she deepened her work to include a line of quilts made from archive A.P.C. fabrics, another example of her continuing obsession with repurposing in fashion.

In 2016 Jessica made the decision to return to live in Jamaica, taking over the running of Harmony Hall, her mother’s gallery which champions local Jamaican art, alongside continuing her fashion projects. Perhaps it was this move that offered Jessica the perspective to look back on her journey thus far. A large theme running through all of Jessica’s work is story telling. In the same way, the exhibition will act as an autobiographical study through the selection and display of pivotal work. Alongside this, Jessica will hold free workshops for the visitors to the exhibition, which in themselves will provide insight and inspiration into her unique practice. Workshops will include free hemming and customisation, amongst other activities. Three workshops will be led by Ogden and places are limited.

To illustrate and further explain the exhibition Jessica and Carol have worked on a publication with accompanying imagery by Syd Shelton and text by Tamsin Blanchard.

Jessica Ogden: Still has been curated by Professor Carol Tulloch and is a Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School project.

Press enquiries: elliott@aipr.co.uk | Exhibition or workshop enquiries: a.viner@chelsea.arts.ac.uk