Category Archives: Events

BAUHAUS 100: Panel Discussion

3pm – 6.30pm | Friday, 9 June 2017 Wilson Road Hall Camberwell College of Arts 1 Wilson Road SE5 8LU

Join us for a lively panel discussion considering the influence of the Bauhaus on art and design in the UK. We will think and work through ideas and aspects of the Bauhaus pedagogy and consider the ways in which it might relate to the contemporary practices of teaching and art making.

This panel discussion follows two days of intensive workshops led by our international partners from Albers Foundation and Bauhaus Dessau. It is an opportunity for anyone interested to become involved in the first stage of a two-year research and events programme in celebration of the centenary year of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Chair: David Crow, Pro Vice-Chancellor UAL and Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon



Panel members:


Torsten Blume, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation 
Fritz Horstman, Albers Foundation


Jane Collins, Professor of Theatre and Performance, UAL


Daniel Sturgis, Reader and Programme Director Fine Art, Camberwell College of Arts


Tracey Waller, Course Leader BA Graphic Design, Camberwell College of Arts



The discussion takes place from 3pm – 4.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. Free and open to all.
 RSVP to reserve your place: [email protected] . 

In partnership with Bauhaus Dessau and the Albers Foundation.

Ligatus Summer School 2017

Ligatus Research Centre (UAL) are pleased to announce the that registration for our Summer School is now Open.

It will be held on 25-29 September and 2-6 October in Norwich, UK, Cathedral Library

Week 1 (25-29 September): Identifying and Recording Bookbinding Structures of the Eastern Mediterranean 

Tutors: Dr Athanasios Velios and Dr Georgios Boudalis

Week 2 (2-6 October): European Bookbinding, 1450-1830 

Tutor: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad

For more information and registration please visit: http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/node/473

Paul Coldwell in conversation with Christopher Le Brun

Professor Paul Coldwell will be in conversation with the Artist & President of the Royal Academy of Arts, Christopher Le Brun.

Book Tickets

Christopher Le Brun is a painter, sculptor and printmaker, an alumni of Chelsea College of Art and the current President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This conversation will primarily focus on his work in print, the discipline for which he was originally elected to the Royal Academy. His work as a printmaker has been rich and varied, ranging in scale and process from large mural scale monotypes made with Garner and Richard Tullis in Santa Barbara, through to small scale intimate etchings published by Paragon Press with whom he has had a long association. Le Brun’s prints are generally the result of a dedicated period of engagement resulting in series and portfolios of work which explore themes and ideas current in his paintings and sculptures. Notable publications include Seven Lithographs 1989, 50 Etchings 1990, Four Riders 1993, Wagner 1994, Motif Light 1998, Paris Lithographs 2000, Fifty Etchings 2005 and the newly released Seria Ludo woodcuts in 2015.

Paul Coldwell is an artist and Professor in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts. He has written extensively on printmaking, is on the editorial board of the journal Print Quarterly and is a regular contributor to Art in Print for whom he writes regularly. He has curated a number of exhibitions including Morandi’s legacy: Influences on British Art (which included Le Brun) and more recently, The artists’ Folio as a site of Inquiry.

This event is organised by Chelsea College of Arts in partnership with Print Quarterly.

Book Tickets

Jessica Ogden: Still

31-33 Church St, London NW8 8ES

26 May – 23 June 2017 (11.00 – 18.00 Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Private View: Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.00 – 20.00 (RSVP to [email protected])

May 2017 sees the opening of an exhibition by Jessica Ogden in London. Entitled Still, it acts as an exploration of Jessica’s work through the static display of archive and current works, alongside a series of workshops. Church Street, Marylebone plays host to the experience, which was born out of a long running conversation between Jessica and Professor Carol Tulloch, writer and curator at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL, who will curate the exhibition. The space is designed by Professor Judith Clark, a London-based curator, who collaborated closely with Jessica.

Born and raised in Jamaica, Jessica began her career in fashion reusing the old to create the new. In 1992, after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Byam Shaw School of Art, she joined Oxfam’s NoLoGo project. Working with donated clothes, Jessica found herself at the forefront of what was then termed customising. The following year Ogden launched her own label using traditional stitching, hand printing and layering techniques and often appropriating old garments such as quilts. Soon after the label’s launch, Ogden staged catwalk shows and presentations as part of London Fashion Week from 1996-2006. Her work continued with cult French label A.P.C., with whom after moving to Paris, she deepened her work to include a line of quilts made from archive A.P.C. fabrics, another example of her continuing obsession with repurposing in fashion.

In 2016 Jessica made the decision to return to live in Jamaica, taking over the running of Harmony Hall, her mother’s gallery which champions local Jamaican art, alongside continuing her fashion projects. Perhaps it was this move that offered Jessica the perspective to look back on her journey thus far. A large theme running through all of Jessica’s work is story telling. In the same way, the exhibition will act as an autobiographical study through the selection and display of pivotal work. Alongside this, Jessica will hold free workshops for the visitors to the exhibition, which in themselves will provide insight and inspiration into her unique practice. Workshops will include free hemming and customisation, amongst other activities. Three workshops will be led by Ogden and places are limited.

To illustrate and further explain the exhibition Jessica and Carol have worked on a publication with accompanying imagery by Syd Shelton and text by Tamsin Blanchard.

Jessica Ogden: Still has been curated by Professor Carol Tulloch and is a Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School project.

Press enquiries: [email protected] | Exhibition or workshop enquiries: [email protected]

 

Painting: Atoms and Speech Bubbles

23 May 2017 | 6:30 pm | Studio | Tickets £3.00 to £5.00 Book Online

In this panel discussion, chaired by artist and writer Zara Worth, artists Jeffrey Dennis, Kimathi Donkor and Fay Nicolson will discuss their practices in relation to the expanded field of contemporary painting.

Each artist will speak about their individual reference points, as well as how their work negotiates between a kind of surface strategy of collage or appropriation of snapshots, magazine images and other windows onto popular culture and the everyday, and a contemplation on scale of the human in relation to his or her political, historical and molecular context.

The same evening will see the launch of Jeffrey Dennis’s new publication Ringbinder, a monograph based on his solo exhibition at Northern Gallery of Contemporary Art in 2015.  Edited by Andrew Hunt and George Vasey, designed by James Langdon, the book includes essays by Sue Hubbard, Sunil Manghani and Dan Smith, an interview with the artist, and the thoughts of artists, writers, curators and gallery directors including Stephen Bury, Jeffery Camp, Nigel Cooke, Dan Coombs, Penelope Curtis, Dexter Dalwood, Stephen Farthing, Catherine Ferguson, Rebecca Fortnum, Ian Giles, Martin Holman, Timothy Hyman, Elizabeth Magill, Jo Melvin, Eleanor Moreton, Lynda Morris, Andrew Nairne, Mathew Sawyer, Barry Schwabsky, Nicholas Serota, Donald Smith, Damian Taylor, Rob Tufnell, Virginia Verran, Emrys Williams and Sam Windett.

Image: Jeffrey Dennis, The Flowers that Came Again (detail), 2012. 122 x 148 cm, oil & charcoal on linen.

Concrete Poetry: UK Networks & Connections – Research Symposium

A CCW & CSM research event part of University of the Arts London (UAL) Research Fortnight 2017

Date: 15 March 2017
Venue: Chelsea College of Arts (Banqueting Hall), University of the Arts London
Admission free 
After decades of scarce academic interest in Concrete poetry, over the last few years a
number of UK-based researchers have started to produce new work, including several
PhD projects (some now completed), approaching this complex subject from both
artistic and literary perspectives.

Concrete poetry, originally a literary movement heavily influenced by Modernist art
(Constructivism and Concrete art), appeared in Brazil, Germany and Switzerland in
the mid-1950s, and was characterized for privileging the visual (typographical)
arrangement of words over more traditional elements of the poem (sound and
meaning). It was adopted by visual artists and incorporated into art practice during
the early and mid-1960s, becoming an international phenomenon through a network
of little magazines, self-publishing and a few influential exhibitions, with the UK
playing an important role in this development.

This would be the first symposium held in the UK aiming at bringing together
academic researchers working in the field of Concrete poetry. Presenters will be
invited to talk about their current topics of work, with panel discussions providing an
overview of the current state of the investigation. There will be a general theme, UK
networks and connections in Concrete poetry, but the emphasis would be for
researchers active in this area to present their recent work.

The symposium will present new, original contributions to our knowledge of the
complex relations of literature and the visual arts, making explicit multiple forms and
examples of mutual influence within experimental practices during the 1960s.
Although the perspective would be primarily historical, it will also be relevant to
current expanding fields like conceptual writing and artists’ writing and publishing.

Programme:
9.45 Welcome/Opening: Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Morning panel
Chair: Dr Michael Asbury 10.00 Paper 1 Dr Steve Willey
10.30 Paper 2 Nicola Simpson
11.00 Paper 3 Gustavo Grandal Montero

(Break 11.30-11.45)

11.45 Paper 4 Dr Greg Thomas
12.15 Paper 5 Alice Tarbuck
12.45 Panel discussion
(1.00pm Lunch break)

Afternoon panel
Chair: Dr Alison Green
2.00pm Paper 6 Dr Michael Asbury
2.30pm Paper 7 Dr Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação 3.00pm Paper 8 Jasmin Wrobel
3.30pm Paper 9 Dr Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

(Break 4-4.15pm)

4.15pm Keynote: ‘Concrete Poetry: Then and now’, Prof. Stephen Bann
4.45pm Panel discussion
5pm Ends

Organised by Gustavo Grandal Montero, PhD candidate, Central Saint Martins (UAL)
and Academic Support Librarian, Chelsea College of Arts / Camberwell College of Arts
(UAL) [email protected]
Advisory panel: Michael Asbury, Alison Green, Jo Melvin (UAL). Nicola Simpson
(NUCA) and Greg Thomas (Edinburgh).

An exhibition of Concrete poetry from the nationally important holdings in the Special
Collections at Chelsea College of Arts Library will be held 13-31 March to coincide with
the symposium, highlighting the role of UAL archives and special collections in PhD
research. Exhibition open to UAL staff and students, alumni and SCONUL members
during library opening hours. External visitors by appointment only.

Image: Futura, issues 1-26. Courtesy of Hansjörg Mayer.

Speakers:

Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Welcome/Opening

Dr. Steve Willey
Visual and verbal permutations in the work of Bob Cobbing Over the last ten years and on both sides of the Atlantic, ‘Make perhaps this out sense of can you’ (1963), a seventeen-line permutation poem by British Concrete Poet Bob Cobbing, has repeatedly been used as the point of access into the world of Cobbing. In 2007 the poem’s title was used as the name for an intermedia event and exhibition of Cobbing materials at the Rosenwald Gallery in the Van-Pelt Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania. In 2011, a BBC Radio 4 documentary on Cobbing used the poem’s title, as did an academic symposium on Cobbing’s work held at Chelsea College of Arts in 2015. This paper argues that using ‘Make Perhaps This Out Sense of Can You’ to signal a critical engagement with Cobbing’s work today, revisits and amplifies relationships between criticism (the making of sense) and community (the making of a ‘School’) that were operating on the poem at the point of its composition in 1963, and further explores broader relationships between permutation and British Concrete poetry.

Nicola Simpson
the sun-cheese wheel-ode and other no things: performing no thingness in the work of dom sylvester houédard, ken cox & li yuan chia
This paper will focus on performing no thingness, the exhibition I recently curated for East Gallery at Norwich University of the Arts (2016). Exhibiting the previously unseen book of onomasticons by dsh, the rarely shown five elemental balloon poem by Ken Cox, and magnetic multiples by Li Yuan Chia, the intention was to demonstrate how, for each artist, performance was central to their understanding and making of poemobjects, poemscores and poemenvironments. These three artists all knew each other, sharing an interest in the Eastern Buddhisms and Taoisms that present objects not as things but as relationships, events and actions. Concluding with a screening of the documented performance of “the sun-cheese wheel-ode a double-rolling-gloster memorial for kencox”, I will illustrate how my doctoral research and curatorial practice has been engaged with (re)performing the archive of dsh to create a space “in which words wld move thru the air”.

Gustavo Grandal Montero
Materialising language: concrete poetry and UK art schools in the mid-1960s
The topic of my research is the relation between Concrete poetry and conceptual art, and the ‘turn to language’ in visual arts during the 1960s. During this decade, a large number of artists embraced ‘new’ media and dematerialised practices, with a significant proportion using language/text as the basis of their work, notably conceptual artists. My presentation will concentrate on the adoption of Concrete poetry by artists and designers based in UK art schools, and its rapid evolution in the central years of the decade (1964-1967), as evidenced at Chelsea School of Art in the collaborations of Edward Wright (dsh, John Furnival, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Stephen Bann, etc.) and the work of Tom Edmonds and others.

Dr. Greg Thomas
The provincial sixties: Literary and artistic culture in the Midlands, West Country and Wales
This paper will explore regional literary and artistic communities during what Arthur Marwick calls the “long sixties” (ca. 1958-74), focusing especially on centres of activity in the Midlands, West Country and Wales. The aim is to interrogate London-centric conceptions of the era’s defining cultural trends by exploring the socio-cultural backdrops and literary and artistic outputs of these alternative cultural centres, emphasising their relationship to defining “sixties” genres such as concrete poetry. The first part of my paper will explore current conceptions of the sixties focused upon London as a hub of literary and artistic activity, established partly by influential memoirs from Jeff Nuttall’s Bomb Culture to Barry Miles’s In the Sixties. I will then sketch out a number of alternative sixties cultural centres, primarily around Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, and Nottingham. Alluding to relevant social and cultural backdrops – the expansion of the university sector, the increasing (and increasingly regionally-focused) provisions of the Arts Councils, the growth of a transnational counter-culture – I will consider the typical operations of such communities, involving independent bookshops, galleries, small presses and magazine series, which became nexuses within national and international cultural networks. These networks were generally connected to North America, and thus to the aesthetics of objectivist, beat and Black Mountain poetry, and of intermedia and pop art; and often with South America and Northern Europe, and thus with the concrete art and poetry movements. Finally, I will consider some exemplary publishing projects of the period, and some of the literature and art produced within such communities. I will allude to some possible implications of this re-adjusted conception of sixties culture by adapting recent insights on late and global modernisms.

Alice Tarbuk
The unstable legacy of concrete poetry in the work of Thomas A. Clark
In 2015 the Hayward Gallery published a work entitled The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century. Amongst emergent concrete and visual artists such as Greg Thomas and Sophie Herxheimer, it was perhaps surprising to see the inclusion of those poet/artists whose work had also formed part of the original concrete poetry ‘renaissance’ of the 1960s, including Stuart Mills, David Bellingham and Thomas A. Clark. (1) (2) It was correct to include Clark amongst the newer visual artist/poets in the anthology, because Clark’s relationship to concrete poetry is neither old nor new: it has been, and continues to be, a major influence on his work.
Indeed, concrete poetry is perhaps the single biggest influence on Clark’s poetic output, and has been since he began making work in the 1960s. In interviews, he credits the wedding gift of an Adana, and his friendship with Ian Hamilton Finlay as the catalysts for his poetic career: he began, then, with concrete poetry. (3)

This paper argues that Clark’s approach to concrete poetry is unusual because, unlike Finlay’s, it persists into the post-concrete era. Clark’s approach to his influences is one of advance and return: he both participates in, and draws back from them, and this is no different for his relationship with concrete poetry, remaining perhaps a little apart from it, even where its influence is clear, making him at once a concrete poet, and a post-concrete poet.
(1) Emmett Williams speaks of ‘the concrete ‘renaissance’ in England, Germany and Sweden during the early sixties’, differentiating this from the first wave of concrete poetry in the 1950s. Williams, Emmett, An Anthology of Concrete Poetry, (New York: Something Else, 1967), p. vii.
(2) Bean, Victoria, Chris McCabe, Kenneth Goldsmith, and Robert Montgomery, The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century, (London: Hayward Gallery, 2015).
(3) ‘The fairly severe limitations of the adana have been a continuing influence on my poetry, as confining and empowering as, let’s say, the haiku or the sonnet.’, Clark, Thomas A. ‘An Inconspicuous Green Flower’ in Bevis, John, Certain trees: the constructed book, poem and object 1964-2006 (Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, France: Centre des livres d’artistes, 2006). p.143.

Dr. Michael Asbury
Haroldo de Campos’ notion of ‘Transcriation’ and the time of art history
This paper draws on the notion of ‘transcriation’ and its relation to poetic writings beyond (but not altogether excluding) the problem of translation within concrete poetry.
Haroldo de Campos responded to works by Helio Oiticica by referring to Ezra Pound’s translation of a Japanese Noh theatre play, the Hagoromo (The Feathered Mantle), as well as the 19th century proto-modernist narrative poem O Guesa Errante (1877) by Joaquim Sousândrade. For Oiticica, the poet’s conjunction invoked further associations, namely with Mallarme’s ‘Un Coup de Des’ and Malevitch’s ‘White on White’, which manifested themselves respectively in films such as ‘Agripina e Roma Manhattan’ and in installation projects such as the Magic Square series. Transcriation thus becomes a means of reconsidering Oiticica’s so-called turn to transmedia which uproots his work from the genealogy of concrete/neococoncrete art placing it under the umbrella of conceptual art.

This example, as limited and specific as it may be, demonstrates nevertheless that the disjunctive temporalities present within the work of contemporary art may far exceed the scope of the consensual time of art history. This complex and transnational matrix of historical references invokes in these works of art hopefully serves to demonstrate the limitations of discourses based on stylistic precedence and more recent proposals purporting the advent of global-art movements such as global conceptualism, ‘other primary structures’, global-pop and so forth.

Dr. Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação
(Re-)interpretations and (mis-)readings: Brazilian, English and Scottish exchanges
The objective of this paper is to examine the dialogue between the Concrete Poets in Brazil and the United Kingdom. The term “Concrete” is generally applied to a variety of artistic movements that followed the post-war frustration with traditional forms of art. Part of a collective search for new artistic materials, Concrete Poetry is the product of two traditions that emerged in the fifties, one of the Bolivian-born Swiss writer, Eugene Gomringer, and the other the Brazilian Noigandres group formed by Haroldo de Campos, Augusto de Campos and Décio Pignatari. Through a productive dialogue, Gomringer and Noigandres brought together these two distinctive artistic projects and disseminated the movement worldwide. Through the analysis of the private exchange of letters, journals, books and artistic objects between Brazilian and British Concrete Poets, more specifically Ian Hamilton Finlay and Edwin Morgan, I wish to shed some light on the cultural and artistic reception of the movement in the United Kingdom. I also wish to argue that this personal form of distribution generated major changes in the poetics of Concrete Poetry as a whole.
Jasmin Wrobel

Transtemporal and trans-spatial dialogues in Haroldo de Campos’ ‘Galáxias’ Latein Amerika Institute – Freie Universität Berlin In the short metatext “dois dedos de prosa sobre uma nova prosa” which accompanies the publication of the first fragments of Galáxias in the literary journal Invenção in 1964, the Brazilian concrete poet Haroldo de Campos defines his book project as a work where “tudo [é] anônimo”, but “personalíssimo” (Campos 1964: 112-113). Indeed, the book reflects the Haroldian cosmos and comprises not only his literary predilections and theoretical interests, but also his journeys and encounters between 1959 and 1976. In my presentation, I would like to illustrate some of the text’s facets that interact on a synchronic level in the “umbigodomundolivro”/”naveloftheworldbook” Galáxias. I intend to emphasize the transtemporal and transpatial poetic mappings and the world literary dialogue in the polyphonic fragments. In a second step, I would like to show in how far the book can also be read as a poetic “Zeitzeugnis”/testimony of the 20th century.

Dr. Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

Concrete poetry and music: connections and counterpoints This presentation will highlight the relations between concrete poetry and music. Focusing on the dialogues between compositional procedures of contemporary music and poetics of concrete poetry, the idea is to hermeneutically analyse how these were of mutual influence, especially observing musical aesthetics of the XX century, such as Serialism, Dodecaphonism and Concrete music. Some examples will be discussed and some Brazilian concrete poetry and popular music will be more comprehensively analysed.

Prof. Stephen Bann
Keynote – Concrete poetry: Then and now
Ian Hamilton Finlay’s decision not to contribute to John Sharkey’s projected anthology of concrete poetry in 1970 marked an irreversible step in his development as a poet and artist. Fundamental differences which separated his approach from that of the London-based poets had come to the fore. This paper will consider two aspects of the poetic experiment of the period that seem relevant today in the light of this disaffiliation. I will look at the conspectus of externally sited works produced for the Brighton Festival of April 1967 – which took place just half a century ago, and also involved staff and students of Chelsea College of Art in a major way. I will also examine how Finlay’s production of folding cards from that period onwards continued to extend the range and potentiality of the concrete poem.

Transpersonal: Elizabeth A. Povinelli

8 Feb 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £5.00 Book Tickets

Elizabeth A. Povinelli is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University where she has also been the Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Law and Culture. She is the author of numerous books and essays as well as a former editor of the academic journal Public Culture.

Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an “anthropology of the otherwise”. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and three films with the Karrabing Film Collective including Wutharr, The Saltwater, 2016 which premiered at Sydney Biennale and was winner of the 2015 European Visible Award.

This lecture is the fourth in a series entitled Transpersonal: art and life directives, ten lectures which will engage with the production of psychotechnologies, socio-political awareness and art and design practices in an automated reality. Each lecture will explore the ways in which the term transpersonal relays states of consciousness that go beyond the limits of personal identity.

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: Karrabing Film Collective, Wutharr: Saltwater Dreams, 2016.

Exchanges between Sol LeWitt and Jeffrey Isaac in Spoleto, Italy, and New York and Chester, Connecticut US

Sol LeWitt and Jeffrey Isaac were neighbours and friends in New York, USA and also in Spoleto, Umbria, Italy. This display documents Sol LeWitt wall drawing 806# in Isaac’s collection and shows a few of the special collection and library’s holdings of Sol LeWitt books. LeWitt publications displayed are ‘100 Cubes’, ‘Autobiography’, Artforum October 1981, ‘Four Basic Kinds of Lines & Colour’, ‘Lines & Color’, and ‘PhotoGrids’. Also showing are Jeffrey Isaac’s imprint, PIM (Public Illumination Magazine) the smallest magazine of its kind.

Jeffrey Isaac met Sol LeWitt through Printed Matter, the artists bookshop in New York that was founded by LeWitt and Lucy Lippard amongst others. He came into the shop with copies of PIM. LeWitt and Isaac were neighbours in New York and in Spoleto, Italy, where LeWitt lived from the mid 1980s for several years, thereafter returning for 3-6 months each year. Isaac moved to Spoleto in 1986 where he has since lived permanently. The two formed a close friendship and had an on going dialogue. This display brings their publications together – for the first time in London. Coincidentally Isaac studied for a year at Camberwell in 1975-76 in the painting department when he made a series of works spanning across London, notably a series of lines in various sites including the National Gallery and Trafalgar Square.

Jeffrey Isaac will be speaking about his work with Jo Melvin in the Green Room at Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street, SW1P 4JU on January 31 2017, at 4.45.

The display is arranged by Jo Melvin, Reader in Fine Art, Archives and Special Collections

 

The Millbank Atlas

21 – 28 January 2017, Monday – Saturday, 10 – 4  

Cookhouse Gallery, Chelsea College of Arts

Curated Conversation on the evening of 20 January 2016, 5 – 8
Interactive Mapping on 24 January, 11 – 4
Finnisage / Closing event on 26 January, 5 – 8
everyone welcome

Interior and Spatial Design and Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School are delighted to join forces for an exhibition and public events programme exploring the lived experience of Millbank

The Millbank Atlas is a collaborative project that brings together researchers, students and local residents to trace the neighbourhood of Chelsea College of Arts. Students of BA Interior and Spatial Design’s Studio 07 have used practice-based research to create maps and other cartographic experiments that identify distinguishing characteristics of this part of London. At stake here is a better understanding of Millbank as comprised of reciprocal relations between the College and surrounding businesses, residential blocks, civil society groups, transportation links and other amenities, infrastructure and further aspects of this built and natural environment.

This exhibition of The Millbank Atlas is cocurated by Dr Marsha Bradfield and Shibboleth Shechter and will showcase an ongoing community relationship that Shechter established with Millbank local Wilfried Rimensberger in 2014.

The Millbank Atlas is made possible thanks to generous support from Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School.

Transpersonal: Susan Kelly | Micropolitics: Practices of Freedom and Rehabilitation

25 Jan 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £6.00 Book Tickets

Micropolitics: Practices of Freedom and Rehabilitation

This lecture, the third in the Transpersonal series, explores what we can learn from terrorist rehabilitation programmes about the relationship between micropolitics and subjectivity, practices of freedom, and the psychic spaces of the (ethno) state today.

From the late 1990s the Egyptian, Yemeni and Saudi Arabian governments developed a series of programmes that sought to ‘rehabilitate’ jihadists as part of broader counterterrorism measures. ‘Jihadi Rehab’ camps employ clerics and scholars to engage in theological debates with prisoners, and provide counselling, education, sports and practical training. Their aim is to re-orientate prisoners toward the family and the private sphere, and to re-programme subjects who are non-violent and accept the legitimacy of the state. Such practices of ‘rehabilitation’ have a long history under British colonialism, and provide us with fascinating blueprints of explicit programmes for the un-making and re-making of political subjects.

The Mau Mau Rehabilitation Camps in Kenya in the 1950s for example, also claimed to transform Kikuyu inmates into loyal and productive citizens. Working with colonially educated ethno-psychiatrists, they attempted to ‘de-programme’ fighters through performative ‘counter-oaths’ that would free the individual from the group. In these contexts, technologies of the self and micropolitical processes are employed not as practices of freedom as thinkers such as Foucault and Fanon conceived of them, but are rather used to consolidate racist and pseudo-medical notions of normalization and submission – coded as ‘cure’.

Susan Kelly is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Her research looks at relationships between art and micropolitics, technologies of the self, space and practices of organisation. She works in the context of various collectives and individually in time-based work, installation and through writing, publishing and convening events and performative/ militant investigations.

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: A still from the British Pathé Newsreel: The Lari Massacre 1953 and the capture of Dedan Kimathi, 1956