Author Archives: Nick Tatchell

Sculptureless Sculpture | Villa Lontana

Curated by Dr. Jo Melvin and Vittoria Bonifati This exhibition at Villa Lontana launches a new collaborative exchange between the Fondazione Dinoed Ernesta Santarelli and contemporary art. Through creating a series of intimate juxtapositions, we hope to draw attention to the performative and sculptural elements that are inherent in classical statuary and architectural fragments, to the potential of being experienced within the context and concerns of contemporary practice. Sculptureless Sculpture brings film and other projected work with
selected artworks and fragments from the Fondazione Santarelli. John Baldessari I Am Making Art (1971) and Baldessari Sings LeWitt (1973), Elisabetta Benassi, Son of Niobe (2013), Ketty La Rocca Appendice Per Una Supplica (1972), Mario Merz, Lumaca (1970) and Ad Reinhardt Travel Slides (1952-1967) will be shown alongside a selection of works from the Fondazione Santarelli including: Giove Eliopolitano III AD, Greek female head I BC, arm fragment II AD, torso of Alexander the Great III AD, fragment of striated sarcophagus II AD, Pinax with theatre masks I AD, Etruscan high relief of Perseus and Medusa V BC and a cleric from Palmyra III AD.

Villa Lontana translates into English as Faraway Villa, was so named because of its distance from the city of Rome. It was literally faraway on a hill. Slowly the city grew to surround it, with land changing from fields and vineyards to conurbation. As an ancient site and an historical building, Villa Lontana provides the opportunity to retrace the complex multilayers of histories of the area of Rome near the Milvian Bridge (built 115 BC). A Roman necropolis of more than one hundred sixty tombs dating back to the first half of the I BC has recently been ‘rediscovered’. Since the Middle Ages the Villa Lontana Estate has been recorded on maps due to its proximity to the Milvian bridge and the Via Francigena. Later it belonged to the Orsini family and then, from the second half of the XVII century, to the Reverend Apostolic Chamber. The property once a notable vineyard, became an exotic garden and the main building was transformed from a rural country house to become the Casino delle delizie (Casino of delights) taking on the imprint of the “illustrious” people that passed through the estate, from Prince Stanislao Poniatowski to Claude Poussin, Antonio Canova and Bertel Thorvaldsen and for the latter three the situation of the Villa created a backdrop for painting and sculpture. Further
changes to the historical building have been made by the British consul among the Vatican Giovanni Freeborn, the engineer, architect and oenologist Giovanni Gabet and by the first director of the American Academy in Rome Samuel A.B. Abbott.

The Collezione Dino ed Ernesta Santarelli spans from the Ptolemaic period until the XIX century with a particular interest on Roman statuary and coloured marbles from Imperial Rome, architecture fragments and painting on stone. There is also an extensive collection of Glyptic art, spanning across five millennia, which is in loan at the Capitolini Museums in Rome.

Private view: Wednesday 16 May, 6pm to 9pm.

The exhibition is open:
17 May – 6 June 2018
11am – 7pm
Tuesday – Saturday and by appointment.

Tel: +39 3392365274
Address:
Via Cassia 53, 00191, Roma

The exhibition is in the former garage of Villa Lontana, designed in 2010 by architect Fabio Ortolani.

Symposium: Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting as Model

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
10-6pm, Thursday 21 June 2018

Yve-Alain Bois’ seminal text Painting as Model, published in 1993, is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being both a conceptual and a material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

Speakers:

Eric Alliez

Philip Armstrong

Jean-Claude Bonne

Matthew Bowman

Alberto Condotta

Moyra Derby

Lisa Florman

The symposium is free and open to all. Booking is essential.

Book your place here: http://bit.ly/painting-as-remodel

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

 

 

Yve-Alain Bois: What’s with the bamboo stick? Matisse’s late drawing practice

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
6-8pm, Wednesday 20 June 2018

In a photograph dating from 1931, Matisse is shown sketching The Dance—a gigantic mural commissioned by Albert Barnes for his Foundation in Merion—with his charcoal at the end of a six-foot bamboo stick. This unusual practice stems from the artist’s discovery, dating from the time he was working on another work now in the Barnes Foundation, his 1906 Bonheur de vivre, that squaring up a small sketch, as has been the standard procedure for large paintings and murals since at least the Renaissance, was incompatible with his aesthetic. The bamboo stick resurfaces in Matisse’s studio at the end of the 1940s when is he working on his Vence Chapel, his old age further emphasizing the acrobatic nature of the feat, and the amazing control the artist had of his drawing tool. But while Matisse’s use of the cane is consistent with the artist’s creed with regard to two of the chapel’s mural—Saint Dominic and the Virgil and Child—it seems absurd when he dealt with the third mural, the Stations of the Cross, for which each of the fourteen stations were first sketched on individual pieces of paper at their final scale. For Matisse, a picture plane must always be conceived and perceived whole; the piecemeal approach is anathema to him—which is to say that the narrative structure of the Stations of the Cross is entirely contradictory to his aesthetic. Yet the choice of this topic for the Vence Chapel was fully his. What is one to make of such a contradiction? And was Matisse attempting to mask it, or on the contrary to reveal it, by the extraordinary rough manner in which he painted his Stations, a deliberate «primitivism» that has so far prevented Matisse scholars to give a close look at this work.

Yve-Alain Bois is Professor of Art History in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He has written extensively on 20th century art, from Matisse and Picasso, Mondrian and Lissitzky to post-war American art. A collection of his essays, Painting as Model, has been published by M.I.T. Press in 1990. With Benjamin Buchloh, Hal Foster, and Rosalind Krauss, he co-authored Art Since 1900 (Thames and Hudson, 2004). He co-organized the 1994-5 retrospective of Piet Mondrian in The Hague, Washington and New York.  In 1996, he curated the exhibition “L’informe, mode d’emploi” with Rosalind Krauss at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. The book accompanying this exhibition has been published in English under the title Formless: A User’s Guide (Zone Books, 1997). Other exhibitions that he curated include “Matisse and Picasso: A Gentle Rivalry” at the Kimbell Museum of Art (Fort Worth), for which he also wrote the catalogue (Matisse and Picasso, Flammarion, 1998); “Ellsworth Kelly: Early Drawings” at the Fogg Art Museum (Cambridge, Mass), which traveled to five other venues in the US and Europe (March 1999-August 2000);  “Ellsworth Kelly: Tablet,” at the Drawing Center, New York (May-June 2002); and “Picasso Harlequin” (October 2008-February 2009) at the Vittoriano in Rome. Bois is one of the editors of the journal October and a contributing editor of Artforum. Among other projects, he is currently working on the catalogue raisonné of Ellsworth Kelly’s paintings and sculpture, the first volume of which was published by Cahiers d’art (Paris) in 2015. He also edited the catalogue raisonné of Matisse’s paintings in the Barnes Foundation, published in 2015 by Thames and Hudson.
Tickets: £5/3

To book your place for this lecture, please visit: bit.ly/yve-alain-bois

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: Matisse sketching The Dance, The Barnes Collection, 1931.

Symposium: Women in Conceptual Art

 

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts
9.30-7pm, Thursday 24 May 2018

The Women in Conceptual Art symposium will present new research in performance, scores, film and happenings emerging from female artists’ conceptual art practices. Artists’ work to be addressed will be drawn from but not limited to the following: Christine Kozlov, Eleanor Antin, Lee Lozano, Deborah Hay, Dorothea Rockburne, Hanne Darboven, Ann Hamilton, Pip Benveniste, Carlyle Reedy, Marie Yates, Annabelle Nicolson and Anne Bean.

Speakers:
– A K Dolven
– Kaitlin Doyle
– Karen Di Franco
– Sophia Hao
– Lina Hermsdorf
– Rozemin Keshvani
– Irene Revell
– Amy Tobin
– Catherine Wood

Tickets: £8/6 (includes lunch and post-event drinks)
Book your place here: http://bit.ly/women-in-conceptual-art

Convened by Dr Jo Melvin and presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: A K Dolven. Stills from ‘Amazon’ 16mm film, mute, 1 min 34 (2005). Edited to the Allegro Molto of Shostakovich’s String Quartet No.8b In C Minor, Op. 110

 

TrAIN Events: May 2018

‘Utsuwa Utsushi’ 

Symposium
TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE  
(until 1st May)

4th May 2018, 9:00-19:00

Symposium – Banqueting Hall 
Exhibition/demonstration – Red Room

Chelsea College of Arts
16 John Islip Street
London SW1P 4JU

Hiroshi Onishi, Machiya of Image, 2012

Tickets £8/£6 (concession) 
refreshments and lunch included
Tickets are available HERE

Drawing from the wordplay of two etymologically associated Japanese terminologies: ‘Utsuwa’ (vessel, container, receptacle, vacuum, reality) and ‘Utsushi’ (copy, transfer, possessed), this symposium raises philosophical and visual cultural questions on the conventional idea of dichotomy ‘original’ vs ‘copy’, ‘fine art’ vs ‘applied art’/’craft’, ‘seen’ vs ‘unseen’ and ‘material’ vs ‘immaterial’.

According to Inaga Shigemi who inspired this symposium with his idea of ‘“Pirates’ View” of world history’, the current rigid legal regulations and knowledge production system set by Euroamerica have been challenged by the pirate’s trade their products and access to information.  However, the negativity attached to the idea of ‘copy’ also enables us to realise the positive values that can be found in the Japanese/East Asian ideas.

More Information and tickets are HERE

 

Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’

Image: Stephen White

An exhibition developed by Trish Scott, who has just been awarded a PhD from Chelsea College of Arts, has just under two weeks left to run at Turner Contemporary in Margate.

Journeys with “The Waste Land” is an exhibition exploring resonances between the visual arts and T.S. Eliot’s complex and influential poem “The Waste Land”, part of which Eliot wrote in Margate before its publication in 1922.

In conjunction with Guest Curator, Professor Mike Tooby, who initiated the exhibition, Trish Scott has been working for the last three years to develop a unique curatorial approach underpinning the genesis of the show, working collaboratively with local residents to co-curate all aspects of the exhibition’s development, resulting in a multi-voiced presentation that echoes the very form of Eliot’s poem.

Image: Jenni Deakin

Debating the poem’s contemporary relevance through the visual arts, the exhibition includes works by over 60 artists ranging from the nineteenth centuries through to present day. Artists represented include J.M.W. Turner, Man Ray, Edward Hopper, Philip Guston and Cy Twombly, with contemporary works by Tacita Dean, Jo Stockham, and Christane Baumgartner.

New works made specifically for the exhibition are also displayed, with contributions from such artists as Tess Denman-Cleaver, Henrik Hakansson, John Newling, Rosalie Schweiker and Emma Talbot.

The exhibition closes on the 7 May, 2018.

SYMPOSIUM: Speculative Design: Afrofuturist and indigenous projections

 

1.45-8PM, Wednesday 2 May 2018

Banqueting Suite, Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street London SW1P 4JU

This afternoon symposium brings together researchers and practitioners whose work engages with the themes of Afrofuturism, Indigenous Futures, and other emerging areas of science-fictional/future-orientated cultural practice in which people of colour, indigenous cultures and non-Western subjects take centre stage.

Speculative design will be addressed in terms of its ability to raise problems, rather than solve them. As a tool for speculation, it opens up spaces for presenting problems, to model alternatives, and to generate imaginative responses. It will be explored in relation to cultural practices including art, comics and science fiction writing.

SCHEDULE

13.30 – 14.00 Registration
14.00 – 14.15 Introduction to symposium proceedings

Dan Byrne-Smith

14.20 – 15.05 Keynote

Afrofuturism: Imaginaries, Realities and Practices

Professor Julian Henriques

15.10 – 15.55 Designing a Black Futurity

Florence Okoye

16.00 – 16.45 Finding Fatima: An exercise in location

Natascha Nanji

16.45 – 17.15 Break
17.15 – 18.00 Make It So: World-building in–and out of–Cyberspace

Skawennati

18.05 – 18.50 Keynote

This Is Not My Beautiful House: Reclaiming Our Futures from a Techno-Orientalist Vision

Kelly Kanayama

18.50 – 20.00 Drinks

This symposium is convened by Dr Dan Byrne-Smith, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art theory, Chelsea College of Arts and presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Book Tickets

Call for Papers – Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting As Model

Yve-Alain Bois’ “Painting as Model” which was Published 1993 is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being a conceptual and material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

To coincide with the Painting as ReModel Conference at Camberwell College of Arts on the  20 & 21 June 2018 and the Journal of Contemporary Painting Special Issue on the subject, we are looking for papers that address ideas and issues that connect to Bois’ Painting As Model.

Abstract Submissions

150 words by April 16th to    academicadminfineart@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

PQ 2019 | Site Specific Performance Festival Open Call

Wimbledon PhD Graduate, Dr. Sophie Jump, is the curator of the Site Specific Performance Festival at the Prague Quadrennial 2019.

www.pq.cz/en/opencall-site-specific-performance-festival

An International Jury awarded the Prague Quadrennial as one of the 12 of the most trend- setting European festivals of the 2015 from a pool of 760 festivals from 31 countries. The main criteria were Artistic Merit, Innovation, Internationality, Political Value and Sustainability.

From the EFFE jury statement: “Another hugely significant international gathering in its eld, the Prague Quadrennial has identi ed a specific area of artistic practice and made a great impact. Its programmes for students and young professionals are an extremely important aspect of its programme, making it a vital gathering for young artists and designers where they can come together and invent the future of stage design.”

PQ festival is the liveliest, and perhaps the most energizing and inspiring part of PQ that speaks about our contemporary experience, forges new connections, brings new audiences, and gives an opportunity to many artists not only from the area of performance design but also all other related fields to share the newest ideas and most current reflections of our world today. There is an open call to performance designers, directors, choreographers, performers and artists to bring their performances inspired by PQ site and Prague locations where performance design plays integral role and works that could change the regular patterns of the daily city life into a series of memorable moments. The festival is both an incubator and a forecaster of new trends in performance.

The Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space invites submissions for the Site Specific Performance Festival, a curated, non-competitive project that will take place in Prague, 7-15 June 2019. Proposals are accepted from performance designers, directors, choreographers, performers and artists of all career levels.

CURATOR: Sophie Jump

DATES: 
• Call Published: 30 November 2017
• Deadline for Submission: 28 February 2018
• Official Selection Announced: 15 April 2018
• 14th Edition of Prague Quadrennial: 6-16 June 2019
• Site Specific Performance Festival: 7-15 June 2019

For more information and conditions for submissions for the Site Specific Performance Festival, please, follow attached files.

Please complete attached form in English and return to call@pq.cz saved as “artistname.application.pdf” with email subject line SITE SPECIFIC. Deadline for submission is 28 February 2018. No handwritten or incomplete applications will be accepted. Carefully read the Call for Applications before filling out this form.

Bentham and the Arts

Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon’s Graduate School Director and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Malcolm Quinn, is co-convening a seminar series on Bentham and the Arts.

The seminar series will consider the sceptical challenge presented by Jeremy Bentham’s hedonistic utilitarianism to the existence of the aesthetic, as represented in the oft-quoted statement that, ‘Prejudice apart, the game of push-pin is of equal value with the arts and sciences of music and poetry. If the game of push-pin furnish more pleasure, it is more valuable than either.’ This statement is one part of a complex set of arguments on culture, taste, and utility that Bentham pursued over his lifetime, in which sensations of pleasure and pain were opposed to aesthetic sensibility.

Hosted by the Bentham Project and Faculty of Laws, University College London and the University of the Arts, London

Sponsored by UCL Faculty of Laws; UCL Bentham Project; and the International Society for Utilitarian Studies (ISUS)

Co convenors: Anthony Julius (UCL); Malcolm Quinn (UAL); Philip Schofield (UCL)

All seminars take place on Tuesday evenings, at 6.00 pm, at UCL.  All are welcome.

The seminars on 30 January, 20 February, 6 March and 20 March 2018 will take place in G10 Lecture Theatre, Chandler House, 2 Wakefield Street, London, WC1N 1PF.

The remaining seminars will take place in the Moot Court, Bentham House, Endsleigh Gardens, London, WC1H 0EG.

For abstracts of papers, please consult the full programme.

30 January 2018 BENTHAM SYMPOSIUM. Bentham’s Challenge to Aesthetics: Benjamin Bourcier (Catholic University of Lille); Malcolm Quinn (University of the Arts, London); Philip Schofield (UCL)
20 February 2018 Anthony Julius (UCL): Who was the greater champion of literature, Bentham or Mill?
6 March 2018 Stella Sandford (Kingston): ‘Envy accompanied with Antipathy’: Bentham and Freud on the Psychology of Sexual Ressentiment
20 March 2018 Tim Milnes (Edinburgh): Bentham, Romanticism, and the Arts
1 May 2018 Frances Ferguson (Chicago): Jeremy Bentham’s Expansive Aesthetics: Pushpin Too
22 May 2018 Emmanuelle de Champs (Cergy-Pointoise): Bentham and Dumont on Taste and Literature
29 May 2018 Carey Young (UCL): tbc
5 June 2018 Fran Cottell (University of the Arts London) and Marianne Mueller (Architectural Association): Pentagon Petal: from Pain to Pleasure
19 June 2018 Carolyn Shapiro (Falmouth): The Image of Bentham

For enquiries please contact Phil Baker, UCL Laws: philip.baker@ucl.ac.uk (020 3108 8480).