Author Archives: Nick Tatchell

Walking Between Streets in the Sky

In 2017, Tamara Stoll and James Lander developed their shared interests in social housing in London under threat of redevelopment and the practice of walking and conversation, into a visual essay. The housing in question, Boundary Estate, Ashington House, Ocean Estate, Balfron Tower and Robin Hood Gardens is located in Tower Hamlets, East London. Tamara and James invited collaborators to five conversation-led walks between two estates at a time: Ken Worpole, Lisa Mckenzie, Nayia Yiakoumaki, Geraldine Dening, Simon Elmer and Catherine Croft. Input was sought from architecture to activism, from anthropology to art. The aim was to make connections between different experiences, perspectives and areas of expertise.

Titled ‘Walking Between Streets in the Sky’, the book maps each estate through selections from conversation transcripts accompanied by footnotes. Limited to an edition of 50 copies, each book lists the 50 recipients who were chosen for a connection between where they live or work and the content of the conversations. The Architects for Social Housing (ASH), co-founded by Dening and Elmer, included the book in their discursive week long residency at the ICA, London in Summer 2017. Walking Between Streets in the Sky is accessible at libraries in Tower Hamlets, at UAL libraries and as a pdf here.

Book design is by Bec Worth, an Australian designer with an interest in the social implications, and digressive possibilities, of walking. Bec is a participant of the MA Graphic Media Design course at London College of Communication (LCC). Tamara, an LCC alumnus, is a post-graduate photography student at the Academy of Fine Arts, Leipzig, Germany. James is a PhD candidate at Chelsea College of Arts, London. Printing was supported by the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon MPhil/PhD Student Initiative Fund.

 

BAUHAUS 100: Panel Discussion

3pm – 6.30pm | Friday, 9 June 2017 Wilson Road Hall Camberwell College of Arts 1 Wilson Road SE5 8LU

Join us for a lively panel discussion considering the influence of the Bauhaus on art and design in the UK. We will think and work through ideas and aspects of the Bauhaus pedagogy and consider the ways in which it might relate to the contemporary practices of teaching and art making.

This panel discussion follows two days of intensive workshops led by our international partners from Albers Foundation and Bauhaus Dessau. It is an opportunity for anyone interested to become involved in the first stage of a two-year research and events programme in celebration of the centenary year of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Chair: David Crow, Pro Vice-Chancellor UAL and Head of Colleges Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon



Panel members:


Torsten Blume, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation 
Fritz Horstman, Albers Foundation


Jane Collins, Professor of Theatre and Performance, UAL


Daniel Sturgis, Reader and Programme Director Fine Art, Camberwell College of Arts


Tracey Waller, Course Leader BA Graphic Design, Camberwell College of Arts



The discussion takes place from 3pm – 4.30pm, followed by a drinks reception. Free and open to all.
 RSVP to reserve your place: [email protected] . 

In partnership with Bauhaus Dessau and the Albers Foundation.

Horniman Museum Art, Design and Natural History Fellowship 2017-2020

Fellowship Opportunity

Camberwell, Chelsea Wimbledon Graduate School would like to invite all research active staff on 0.2 or above contract to submit proposal for a new Fellowship with the Horniman Museum and Gardens. Please find attached a brief and application form for The Horniman Museum Art, Design and Natural History Fellowship 2017-2020. This fellowship is part of an exciting new cultural partnership between Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School and The Horniman Museum and Garden Trust.

The Fellowship will focus on developing new ways the Horniman Museum can use their Natural History collections and displays to “communicate and encourage audiences to gain a deeper understanding of the global environmental changes and challenges affecting the natural world (the science, the impact and implications for us all).

To apply please download and read the brief below and fill in the application form (below). Please email your application to Abby Viner [email protected]  by 5pm on Friday 16 June 2017

Application Form…

The Horniman Museum Fellowship application form 2017  Horniman Museum Fellowship brief 2017

Brief…

Horniman Museum Fellowship brief 2017

Bletchley Park Week

5 June – 10 June

From code-breaking to cyber security

Kellogg will celebrate its strong and growing ties with Bletchley Park with a week-long programme of events from 5 to 10 June 2017. Scroll down for an overview of the week and please keep checking back for further details.

Bletchley Park was the home of wartime code-breaking, as featured in The Imitation Game, a 2014 film in which Benedict Cumberbatch portrayed the mathematician Alan Turing and his efforts to crack the German Enigma code. There will be something for everyone, including a visit by one of the Enigma machines from Bletchley; access to the ‘roll of honour’ where the database can be searched for those who worked there; a poster competition to describe relevant research, the winners of which will get to display their posters at Bletchley and explain the research to the many thousands of visitors; the first of what we intend to be an annual Kellogg coach trip to Bletchley, with guided tours; and two themed Guest Night Dinners.

Ligatus Summer School 2017

Ligatus Research Centre (UAL) are pleased to announce the that registration for our Summer School is now Open.

It will be held on 25-29 September and 2-6 October in Norwich, UK, Cathedral Library

Week 1 (25-29 September): Identifying and Recording Bookbinding Structures of the Eastern Mediterranean 

Tutors: Dr Athanasios Velios and Dr Georgios Boudalis

Week 2 (2-6 October): European Bookbinding, 1450-1830 

Tutor: Professor Nicholas Pickwoad

For more information and registration please visit: http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/node/473

Paul Coldwell in conversation with Christopher Le Brun

Professor Paul Coldwell will be in conversation with the Artist & President of the Royal Academy of Arts, Christopher Le Brun.

Book Tickets

Christopher Le Brun is a painter, sculptor and printmaker, an alumni of Chelsea College of Art and the current President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

This conversation will primarily focus on his work in print, the discipline for which he was originally elected to the Royal Academy. His work as a printmaker has been rich and varied, ranging in scale and process from large mural scale monotypes made with Garner and Richard Tullis in Santa Barbara, through to small scale intimate etchings published by Paragon Press with whom he has had a long association. Le Brun’s prints are generally the result of a dedicated period of engagement resulting in series and portfolios of work which explore themes and ideas current in his paintings and sculptures. Notable publications include Seven Lithographs 1989, 50 Etchings 1990, Four Riders 1993, Wagner 1994, Motif Light 1998, Paris Lithographs 2000, Fifty Etchings 2005 and the newly released Seria Ludo woodcuts in 2015.

Paul Coldwell is an artist and Professor in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts. He has written extensively on printmaking, is on the editorial board of the journal Print Quarterly and is a regular contributor to Art in Print for whom he writes regularly. He has curated a number of exhibitions including Morandi’s legacy: Influences on British Art (which included Le Brun) and more recently, The artists’ Folio as a site of Inquiry.

This event is organised by Chelsea College of Arts in partnership with Print Quarterly.

Book Tickets

Jessica Ogden: Still

31-33 Church St, London NW8 8ES

26 May – 23 June 2017 (11.00 – 18.00 Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Private View: Thursday 25 May 2017, 18.00 – 20.00 (RSVP to [email protected])

May 2017 sees the opening of an exhibition by Jessica Ogden in London. Entitled Still, it acts as an exploration of Jessica’s work through the static display of archive and current works, alongside a series of workshops. Church Street, Marylebone plays host to the experience, which was born out of a long running conversation between Jessica and Professor Carol Tulloch, writer and curator at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL, who will curate the exhibition. The space is designed by Professor Judith Clark, a London-based curator, who collaborated closely with Jessica.

Born and raised in Jamaica, Jessica began her career in fashion reusing the old to create the new. In 1992, after graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Byam Shaw School of Art, she joined Oxfam’s NoLoGo project. Working with donated clothes, Jessica found herself at the forefront of what was then termed customising. The following year Ogden launched her own label using traditional stitching, hand printing and layering techniques and often appropriating old garments such as quilts. Soon after the label’s launch, Ogden staged catwalk shows and presentations as part of London Fashion Week from 1996-2006. Her work continued with cult French label A.P.C., with whom after moving to Paris, she deepened her work to include a line of quilts made from archive A.P.C. fabrics, another example of her continuing obsession with repurposing in fashion.

In 2016 Jessica made the decision to return to live in Jamaica, taking over the running of Harmony Hall, her mother’s gallery which champions local Jamaican art, alongside continuing her fashion projects. Perhaps it was this move that offered Jessica the perspective to look back on her journey thus far. A large theme running through all of Jessica’s work is story telling. In the same way, the exhibition will act as an autobiographical study through the selection and display of pivotal work. Alongside this, Jessica will hold free workshops for the visitors to the exhibition, which in themselves will provide insight and inspiration into her unique practice. Workshops will include free hemming and customisation, amongst other activities. Three workshops will be led by Ogden and places are limited.

To illustrate and further explain the exhibition Jessica and Carol have worked on a publication with accompanying imagery by Syd Shelton and text by Tamsin Blanchard.

Jessica Ogden: Still has been curated by Professor Carol Tulloch and is a Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School project.

Press enquiries: [email protected] | Exhibition or workshop enquiries: [email protected]

 

Painting: Atoms and Speech Bubbles

23 May 2017 | 6:30 pm | Studio | Tickets £3.00 to £5.00 Book Online

In this panel discussion, chaired by artist and writer Zara Worth, artists Jeffrey Dennis, Kimathi Donkor and Fay Nicolson will discuss their practices in relation to the expanded field of contemporary painting.

Each artist will speak about their individual reference points, as well as how their work negotiates between a kind of surface strategy of collage or appropriation of snapshots, magazine images and other windows onto popular culture and the everyday, and a contemplation on scale of the human in relation to his or her political, historical and molecular context.

The same evening will see the launch of Jeffrey Dennis’s new publication Ringbinder, a monograph based on his solo exhibition at Northern Gallery of Contemporary Art in 2015.  Edited by Andrew Hunt and George Vasey, designed by James Langdon, the book includes essays by Sue Hubbard, Sunil Manghani and Dan Smith, an interview with the artist, and the thoughts of artists, writers, curators and gallery directors including Stephen Bury, Jeffery Camp, Nigel Cooke, Dan Coombs, Penelope Curtis, Dexter Dalwood, Stephen Farthing, Catherine Ferguson, Rebecca Fortnum, Ian Giles, Martin Holman, Timothy Hyman, Elizabeth Magill, Jo Melvin, Eleanor Moreton, Lynda Morris, Andrew Nairne, Mathew Sawyer, Barry Schwabsky, Nicholas Serota, Donald Smith, Damian Taylor, Rob Tufnell, Virginia Verran, Emrys Williams and Sam Windett.

Image: Jeffrey Dennis, The Flowers that Came Again (detail), 2012. 122 x 148 cm, oil & charcoal on linen.

This Has NOT Been Cancelled

John Latham audio/visuals & conversations

2 May 5.30-8pm, Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts

 

A rare lecture recording and films by John Latham form the starting point for three conversations around the themes Not Knowing, Flat Time (House), and the Artist Placement Group/the artist as Incidental Person by invited artists, writers and curators including Gill Addison, Gareth Bell-Jones, Paul Clinton, Katherine Jackson, William Kherbek and Jo Melvin.

<< All welcome, no need to book! >>

Gill Addison is an artist and academic based in London. Her recent projects negotiated ‘how’ and ‘where’ research manifest as an activity, event, and material within artist film and video practices and histories.

Gareth Bell-Jones is a curator and writer, currently curator/director of Flat Time House. From 2010-14 he was a curator at Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge and a regular visiting tutor to the RCA, Curating Contemporary Art Department.

Paul Clinton is a writer based in London. He is associate editor of frieze and Frieze Masters Magazine. In 2015 he co-curated the exhibition ‘duh? Art & Stupidity’ at Focal Point Gallery, Southend-on-Sea.

Katherine Jackson is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia and currently a visiting researcher at the Slade School of Fine Art. Her dissertation research focuses on the Artist Placement Group and John Latham in 1970s UK. She has worked as Flat Time House’s archive and research specialist since 2015.

William Kherbek is the writer of the novels Ecology of Secrets and ULTRALIFE (Arcadia Missa, 2013/2016) and the epic poem, Pull Factor (2016). The video-poem collection Ephemera was posted work by work to Youtube in 2014. His essay “Technofeudalism and the Tragedy of the Commons” (2016) appeared in the first issue of Doggerland’s journal, and he has contributed essays to the “Intersubjectivity” series from Sternberg Press.

Jo Melvin is a Reader in Fine Art, Archives and Special Collections at Chelsea College of Arts; a curator of projects including an ongoing collaboration with the performance collective JocJonJosh, ‘Five Issues of Studio International’ at Raven Row; and a writer of essays including “The Xerox Book” for Paula Cooper Gallery (New York) and “British Art and Conceptualism 1966-1979” for Tate Britain.

Emma Gradin is an independent curator and research student at Chelsea College of Arts developing and deploying curatorial strategies founded on extended states of not-knowing and creative suspension in the current context of time-shortness and accelerated productivity/consumption.

This Has NOT Been Cancelled was made possible by the UAL: Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Student Initiative Fund.

Chelsea College of Arts Banqueting Hall, Tuesday 2 May 5.30-8pm

First Food Residency – Chelsea College of Arts, UAL

July 3rd to August 21st 2017
Deadline for submission of proposals 10am, 17th April 2017
The First Food Residency 2017 invites proposals from MA students, PhD
candidates or Alumni of Chelsea College of Arts, UAL. Two Artists will be selected
to take part in a creative research residency in Oaxaca, Mexico, culminating in a
group exhibition.
Research should be based around material relevant to sustainability (particularly in
the production of food and craft) in Mexico. Inspiration can be taken loosely from a
broad range of subjects such as social history, the future of GM and mono crop
systems, branding, foods that are unfamiliar in the UK but indigenous to Mexico,
e.g. Cactus/Maize etc. A suggested focus for this year will be around cacti and in
particular
‘Nopal’ and its inherent relationship with the cochineal beetle. For ideas and
examples of the kind of work that has been done before, please see the link to
previous exhibitions at www.firstfoodresidency.com or the Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/ firstfoodresidency/
This residency offers studio space with the University of Oaxaca, UABJO
(Universidad Autonoma Benito Juarez de Oaxaca), who will also host a final
exhibition.
During their stay in Mexico, the student will have the opportunity to access facilities
through UABJO for technical support, and additional assistance through First Food
for research and practical information.
Specific research is supported by First Foods who will help achieve the ambition of
a successful individual proposal. Trips are organised to villages that are known for
specialist craft activities, a cochineal farm, Mescal distilleries and areas of
agricultural interest, to meet farmers and growers. The residency has a relationship
with Puente de la Salud, a respected charity who specialise in the promotion of
Amaranth.
Co – founders of the project, Anna and Antonia Bruce will oversee the residency
alongside previous First Food residents who will be engaged to support the artists
in residence for research and social activities. There will be regular documentation
of the work produced as a record of activities.
APPLICATION GUIDELINES
This residency in Mexico is open to all interpretations. However, there must be a
visual expression to the completed work that can be included in a ‘pop up’
exhibition at the end of the residency, and be called upon for future exhibitions with
the First Food Residency.
Proposals must be sent as PDFs to the following address by 10am on the 17th
April 2017: [email protected]
In the proposal the following information should be included:
⁃ Name
⁃ Age
⁃ Address
⁃ A recent photograph
⁃ CV
⁃ Biography (100 to 200 words)
⁃ Details of exhibitions and / or artistic works published
⁃ Three examples of works, including images, date of completion and dimensions.
⁃ In case of a performance artist, please include links to pictures or videos.
⁃ Objectives and creative intent (300-500 words)
⁃ A work schedule, describing in detail how you will use the time to carry the
investigation and completion of the work.
⁃ description of the type of space required to work and the necessary materials. ⁃
Description of other requests for funding (if any)
⁃ A letter of recommendation from an art institution or a recognised artist, which can
be both UK or Mexico.
⁃ Spanish level: Advanced / Intermediate / Basic / Non-existent
With the support of UABJO, First Food Residency is able to offer workspace
and facilitation of research. Chelsea, UAL will organise flights and provide a
stipend for the stay.
For more information contact us on email: [email protected]
During their stay in Mexico, the artists in residence will have the opportunity to
access facilities through UABJO, technical support and additional facilitation
through First Food to source materials and contacts outside of UABJO.
Facilities include sculpture and printing workshops, photography and digital
workshops. For textile students, relationships have been built with the weaving
villages who can offer access to looms and help with materials. The residency
also offers communication with and visits to farms through local charity Puente de
la Salud.