Monthly Archives: May 2018

Sculptureless Sculpture | Villa Lontana

Curated by Dr. Jo Melvin and Vittoria Bonifati This exhibition at Villa Lontana launches a new collaborative exchange between the Fondazione Dinoed Ernesta Santarelli and contemporary art. Through creating a series of intimate juxtapositions, we hope to draw attention to the performative and sculptural elements that are inherent in classical statuary and architectural fragments, to the potential of being experienced within the context and concerns of contemporary practice. Sculptureless Sculpture brings film and other projected work with
selected artworks and fragments from the Fondazione Santarelli. John Baldessari I Am Making Art (1971) and Baldessari Sings LeWitt (1973), Elisabetta Benassi, Son of Niobe (2013), Ketty La Rocca Appendice Per Una Supplica (1972), Mario Merz, Lumaca (1970) and Ad Reinhardt Travel Slides (1952-1967) will be shown alongside a selection of works from the Fondazione Santarelli including: Giove Eliopolitano III AD, Greek female head I BC, arm fragment II AD, torso of Alexander the Great III AD, fragment of striated sarcophagus II AD, Pinax with theatre masks I AD, Etruscan high relief of Perseus and Medusa V BC and a cleric from Palmyra III AD.

Villa Lontana translates into English as Faraway Villa, was so named because of its distance from the city of Rome. It was literally faraway on a hill. Slowly the city grew to surround it, with land changing from fields and vineyards to conurbation. As an ancient site and an historical building, Villa Lontana provides the opportunity to retrace the complex multilayers of histories of the area of Rome near the Milvian Bridge (built 115 BC). A Roman necropolis of more than one hundred sixty tombs dating back to the first half of the I BC has recently been ‘rediscovered’. Since the Middle Ages the Villa Lontana Estate has been recorded on maps due to its proximity to the Milvian bridge and the Via Francigena. Later it belonged to the Orsini family and then, from the second half of the XVII century, to the Reverend Apostolic Chamber. The property once a notable vineyard, became an exotic garden and the main building was transformed from a rural country house to become the Casino delle delizie (Casino of delights) taking on the imprint of the “illustrious” people that passed through the estate, from Prince Stanislao Poniatowski to Claude Poussin, Antonio Canova and Bertel Thorvaldsen and for the latter three the situation of the Villa created a backdrop for painting and sculpture. Further
changes to the historical building have been made by the British consul among the Vatican Giovanni Freeborn, the engineer, architect and oenologist Giovanni Gabet and by the first director of the American Academy in Rome Samuel A.B. Abbott.

The Collezione Dino ed Ernesta Santarelli spans from the Ptolemaic period until the XIX century with a particular interest on Roman statuary and coloured marbles from Imperial Rome, architecture fragments and painting on stone. There is also an extensive collection of Glyptic art, spanning across five millennia, which is in loan at the Capitolini Museums in Rome.

Private view: Wednesday 16 May, 6pm to 9pm.

The exhibition is open:
17 May – 6 June 2018
11am – 7pm
Tuesday – Saturday and by appointment.

Tel: +39 3392365274
Address:
Via Cassia 53, 00191, Roma

The exhibition is in the former garage of Villa Lontana, designed in 2010 by architect Fabio Ortolani.

Symposium: Painting as ReModel: Revisiting Painting as Model

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
10-6pm, Thursday 21 June 2018

Yve-Alain Bois’ seminal text Painting as Model, published in 1993, is still cited as being an extremely important collection of essays that looks at painting as being both a conceptual and a material enquiry. Bois believes that one must concentrate on both the formal elements of a work of art and its physical qualities to fully understand its totality.

Speakers:

Eric Alliez

Philip Armstrong

Jean-Claude Bonne

Matthew Bowman

Alberto Condotta

Moyra Derby

Lisa Florman

The symposium is free and open to all. Booking is essential.

Book your place here: http://bit.ly/painting-as-remodel

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

 

 

Yve-Alain Bois: What’s with the bamboo stick? Matisse’s late drawing practice

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts
6-8pm, Wednesday 20 June 2018

In a photograph dating from 1931, Matisse is shown sketching The Dance—a gigantic mural commissioned by Albert Barnes for his Foundation in Merion—with his charcoal at the end of a six-foot bamboo stick. This unusual practice stems from the artist’s discovery, dating from the time he was working on another work now in the Barnes Foundation, his 1906 Bonheur de vivre, that squaring up a small sketch, as has been the standard procedure for large paintings and murals since at least the Renaissance, was incompatible with his aesthetic. The bamboo stick resurfaces in Matisse’s studio at the end of the 1940s when is he working on his Vence Chapel, his old age further emphasizing the acrobatic nature of the feat, and the amazing control the artist had of his drawing tool. But while Matisse’s use of the cane is consistent with the artist’s creed with regard to two of the chapel’s mural—Saint Dominic and the Virgil and Child—it seems absurd when he dealt with the third mural, the Stations of the Cross, for which each of the fourteen stations were first sketched on individual pieces of paper at their final scale. For Matisse, a picture plane must always be conceived and perceived whole; the piecemeal approach is anathema to him—which is to say that the narrative structure of the Stations of the Cross is entirely contradictory to his aesthetic. Yet the choice of this topic for the Vence Chapel was fully his. What is one to make of such a contradiction? And was Matisse attempting to mask it, or on the contrary to reveal it, by the extraordinary rough manner in which he painted his Stations, a deliberate «primitivism» that has so far prevented Matisse scholars to give a close look at this work.

Yve-Alain Bois is Professor of Art History in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He has written extensively on 20th century art, from Matisse and Picasso, Mondrian and Lissitzky to post-war American art. A collection of his essays, Painting as Model, has been published by M.I.T. Press in 1990. With Benjamin Buchloh, Hal Foster, and Rosalind Krauss, he co-authored Art Since 1900 (Thames and Hudson, 2004). He co-organized the 1994-5 retrospective of Piet Mondrian in The Hague, Washington and New York.  In 1996, he curated the exhibition “L’informe, mode d’emploi” with Rosalind Krauss at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. The book accompanying this exhibition has been published in English under the title Formless: A User’s Guide (Zone Books, 1997). Other exhibitions that he curated include “Matisse and Picasso: A Gentle Rivalry” at the Kimbell Museum of Art (Fort Worth), for which he also wrote the catalogue (Matisse and Picasso, Flammarion, 1998); “Ellsworth Kelly: Early Drawings” at the Fogg Art Museum (Cambridge, Mass), which traveled to five other venues in the US and Europe (March 1999-August 2000);  “Ellsworth Kelly: Tablet,” at the Drawing Center, New York (May-June 2002); and “Picasso Harlequin” (October 2008-February 2009) at the Vittoriano in Rome. Bois is one of the editors of the journal October and a contributing editor of Artforum. Among other projects, he is currently working on the catalogue raisonné of Ellsworth Kelly’s paintings and sculpture, the first volume of which was published by Cahiers d’art (Paris) in 2015. He also edited the catalogue raisonné of Matisse’s paintings in the Barnes Foundation, published in 2015 by Thames and Hudson.
Tickets: £5/3

To book your place for this lecture, please visit: bit.ly/yve-alain-bois

This event is convened by Daniel Sturgis, Reader in Painting and Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Camberwell College of Arts. It is presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: Matisse sketching The Dance, The Barnes Collection, 1931.

Symposium: Women in Conceptual Art

 

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts
9.30-7pm, Thursday 24 May 2018

The Women in Conceptual Art symposium will present new research in performance, scores, film and happenings emerging from female artists’ conceptual art practices. Artists’ work to be addressed will be drawn from but not limited to the following: Christine Kozlov, Eleanor Antin, Lee Lozano, Deborah Hay, Dorothea Rockburne, Hanne Darboven, Ann Hamilton, Pip Benveniste, Carlyle Reedy, Marie Yates, Annabelle Nicolson and Anne Bean.

Speakers:
– A K Dolven
– Kaitlin Doyle
– Karen Di Franco
– Sophia Hao
– Lina Hermsdorf
– Rozemin Keshvani
– Irene Revell
– Amy Tobin
– Catherine Wood

Tickets: £8/6 (includes lunch and post-event drinks)
Book your place here: http://bit.ly/women-in-conceptual-art

Convened by Dr Jo Melvin and presented by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Image: A K Dolven. Stills from ‘Amazon’ 16mm film, mute, 1 min 34 (2005). Edited to the Allegro Molto of Shostakovich’s String Quartet No.8b In C Minor, Op. 110