Monthly Archives: February 2017

other way round

other way round

7 – 9 March | Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Arts

an exhibition by new PhD Students

other way round can mean many things: is it that we have gone the wrong way and should recalculate our itinerary? Or that we are on our way to totally uncharted territory? In this case, we are attempting to make visible diverse approaches to practice-based research. This 1st year PhD students’ exhibition brings together samples of research practice from very different fields, and tries to grow conversations from them. Spanning over fine arts, design and curating, the confrontation of this diverse work in one common space aims to create meaning from these impromptu interactions. By crystallising our ongoing practice at an arbitrary moment in
the PhD journey, we hope to offer a view of the research process and learn from it, as much as we hope to provide food for thought.

Event Programme

Tuesday 7th March 

12-6pm

Neil Farnan

Monopoly to Utopoly – a utopian exchange
The board game Monopoly encapsulates key features
of our economy and celebrates some of its worst
aspects.
This ubiquitous game normalises socially useless
rentier behaviour, although the intention of the original
version was to do the opposite.
Join us in evaluating this particular economic
model and engage with new values, properties and
currencies to design a more utopian economy.
Or pop in later to have fun playing the redesigned
Utopoly game.

Wednesday 8th March

12-3pm
Ana Teles
Copying, transcribing, mimicking, repeating
artists’ paintings
During the period of the exhibition, Ana T. will be
engaging in conversations with artists negotiating her
approach to the copying of their work.

4-6pm
Emma Gradin
Slow Work
What is time? What is worth taking time over? An open
conversation with a group of people including artists,
activists, anthropologists.

Thursday 9th March

12-3pm
Laetitia Forst
Textiles for Disassembly
Design for disassembly exists in everyday products
so as to allow for easy recycling. The visitors are
invited to reflect on how it can be applied to their own
consumption habits and influence their perception of
materials.

3-6pm
Timothy Smith
Sound/Memory/Landscape
An audiovisual dialogue.

6-8pm
Closing reception

All exhibits will be on display 7-9th March 12-6pm. If you wish to attend scheduled events, please refer to this programme.

 

Call for Papers – Robot Futures: Vision and Touch in Robotics symposium

 

This one-day symposium, to take place at the Science Museum, London, on 8th July 2017, will bring together engineers, scientists, cultural theorists and artists to explore notions of embodiment and telepresence in the field of robotics and in virtual and augmented realities.

Humans are embodied in robotic explorers; endowing them with ‘eyes and hands’ robots are able to relate perceptions and experiences of places and objects physically unavailable to us. Although such robots might not ‘look’ human, it is the desire to see stereoscopically, and to feel through all the senses that grant robots anthropomorphic qualities; we see and feel through the robot. In this way robots enable a more embodied experience, which is nonetheless mediated. The development of virtual reality technologies is increasingly enabling us to see and feel as the robot in order to get closer to a more immersive experience.

We invite established and emerging researchers to submit abstracts for paper presentations that address notions of embodiment, telepresence, vision and touch specifically regarding robotics and virtual and augmented realities. We welcome proposals from the arts & humanities and the sciences, particularly from researchers whose work spans both fields.

Please email Luci Eldridge and Nina Trivedi at [email protected] with paper proposals, of 500 words max, by 9pm on Friday 3rd March 2017. Please include a one-page CV with your paper proposal. Feel free to email us with any questions.

Deadline for submissions – Friday 3rd March 2017

Email: [email protected]

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Mexico City, June 18-20, 2017

Re-posted from Toynbee Prize Foundation

For readers interested in the international dimensions of fascism, here’s an exciting (and topical) call for applications for an interdisciplinary workshop  to be held at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Mexico City:

Paper proposals for this workshop on the international dimensions of fascism are warmly invited from scholars, artists and activists working in and across the fields of international law, history, history of art, international relations, postcolonial studies, sociology, anthropology, political theory, geography, feminist studies, queer theory and critical race theory.

In light of the recent and very rapid re-centering of fascist discourse and iconography across the world, the workshop aims to take fascism and its concept of the international seriously as distinctive, perhaps even inevitable consequences of the unification of ‘the world’ as such since 1492.

While the workshop leans towards the field of international law, its character is strongly interdisciplinary. Interventions (including textual, visual and aural interventions) from individuals and groups working in all disciplines are welcome.

We are delighted to say that the workshop is being hosted by the Museo de Arte Moderno (MAM) in Mexico City. The MAM, itself a landmark in modernist architecture, is home to one of the most important collections of anti-fascist art in Latin America. An introduction to and tour of this collection will be included in the workshop’s activities.

The topics we expect to be investigating include (but are by no means limited to):
** The international dimensions of neo-fascist groups like Golden Dawn and the ‘Alt-Right’, together with their historical connections to(and disconnections from) inter-war fascist movements;
** The innovations made by fascist international lawyers and theorists of the international in the1920s and 1930s in Italy, Japan, France, Germany, Argentina and elsewhere;
** The relationship between decolonisation, fascism and anti-colonial theory in Indonesia,Martinique, Ethiopia and elsewhere in the Third World;
** The political economy of fascism;
** The influence of fascist ideas and practices on post-War dictatorships, both in the Third World and in the West;
** The fascist and anti-fascist history of everyday concepts such as environmentalism,motherhood, freedom, space and accumulation;
** The relationship between fascism/anti-fascism and Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and other art movements both during the inter-war period and today.

Abstracts should be sent to the workshop’s organiser, Rose Sydney Parfitt (Melbourne Law School/Kent Law School), at [email protected] no later than 1 March 2017. The organizers of the conference note that spaces are “very limited,” so apply soon! For more information, see the workshop Facebook page.

Call for Papers | MIRAJ | Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Moving Image Review & Art Journal | Issue 7:2

Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Call for Papers | Deadline: 1 March 2017

This issue will be guest edited by Rashmi Sawhney and Lucia King.

The uncontestably global ecologies of contemporary moving image art have invited some deliberation on questions of regional aesthetics, identity, circulation and transnationalism. Yet such discussions have mainly taken place in the context of exhibiting ‘non-western’ art in the western world. Contradictions still persist in the project of destabilizing assumed hierarchies within the Euro-American art world (in the most recent Documenta XI and Venice Biennale, for example) whilst artists of the global South gain currency primarily by meeting the expectations of ‘western’ art markets. Furthermore, Euro-American art historical discourse remains negligent of film and video art’s legacies from the South, including experimental film and screen-based arts. As a consequence, moving image art by ‘non-western’ artists is either caged into essentialist frameworks founded on mythical notions of ‘authenticity’, or stirred into the melting pot of contemporary art without due attention to their particular cultural and aesthetic contexts. This MIRAJ issue, therefore, engages with the particularities of film and video art practices from South Asia, and leverages these in theorising the relationship between regional, global and transnational moving image cultures.

To address some of these gaps in scholarship, this special edition of MIRAJ focuses on the circuits of production, exhibition and authoring of South Asian artists moving image in order to chart key theoretical terrains of ‘regional’ practices in a global context. We solicit articles from artists, critics and curators who work within and outside South Asia, that highlight conceptual frameworks and offer insights on the multi-layered relationships between ‘home and the world’, region and identity, aesthetics and translatability, cultural specificities and contexts of classification/consumption/circulation. We invite articles that build upon foundational work in South Asian moving image art and film histories as well as transnational art practices and aesthetics.

We are particularly interested in articles that address the following:

• Theories of film and video art outside of the ‘national’ framework that are attentive to influences, collaborations and exchanges across geographic and political regions.
• Examples of significant regional exchanges and collaborations between artists and filmmakers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
• The relationship between region, identity and moving image practice in South Asia.
• The aesthetic pre-cursors (in a pre-cinematic sense) that influence contemporary moving image art in the region, including investigations of artist(s)’ methodologies.
• Experiments in film and video art that emphasise ‘indigenous forms’.
• Transnational curatorial practices that work with and around the regional/national framework.
• Historicising South Asian moving image art in the post-medium context.
• Spectatorship and post medium/ multi-media art in/from South Asia.
• South Asian artists’ moving image engagement with science, political activism, environmentalism, urbanism etc.
• South Asian artists’ moving image hybridity with alternate media genres, such as experimental film, documentary, and digital media.
• Digital media and the exhibition and distribution of ‘regional’ moving image art.
• Digital archives and curatorial practices in/about South Asian film & video art.

We publish the following types of writing: scholarly articles (5000-7000 words); opinion pieces, feature articles and interviews (3000-5000 words); review essays of books, individual works, exhibitions and events (3000-5000 words). Scholarly articles will be blind peer-reviewed and feature articles and review essays can be peer-reviewed on request. Articles submitted to MIRAJ should be original and not under consideration by any other publication, including online publications. We do not publish articles by artists about their own work, nor reviews by curators or venues about their own exhibitions.

Please submit completed manuscripts only.
Send all contributions by e-mail in Word format to the Editorial Assistant: [email protected].

Deadline for completed articles: 1 March 2017
Image: Prisms of perception, (2010) Artist: Gigi Scaria. Medium: Video installation. (Image courtesy of the artist).