First Food Residency – Chelsea College of Arts, UAL

July 3rd to August 21st 2017
Deadline for submission of proposals 10am, 17th April 2017
The First Food Residency 2017 invites proposals from MA students, PhD
candidates or Alumni of Chelsea College of Arts, UAL. Two Artists will be selected
to take part in a creative research residency in Oaxaca, Mexico, culminating in a
group exhibition.
Research should be based around material relevant to sustainability (particularly in
the production of food and craft) in Mexico. Inspiration can be taken loosely from a
broad range of subjects such as social history, the future of GM and mono crop
systems, branding, foods that are unfamiliar in the UK but indigenous to Mexico,
e.g. Cactus/Maize etc. A suggested focus for this year will be around cacti and in
particular
‘Nopal’ and its inherent relationship with the cochineal beetle. For ideas and
examples of the kind of work that has been done before, please see the link to
previous exhibitions at www.firstfoodresidency.com or the Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/ firstfoodresidency/
This residency offers studio space with the University of Oaxaca, UABJO
(Universidad Autonoma Benito Juarez de Oaxaca), who will also host a final
exhibition.
During their stay in Mexico, the student will have the opportunity to access facilities
through UABJO for technical support, and additional assistance through First Food
for research and practical information.
Specific research is supported by First Foods who will help achieve the ambition of
a successful individual proposal. Trips are organised to villages that are known for
specialist craft activities, a cochineal farm, Mescal distilleries and areas of
agricultural interest, to meet farmers and growers. The residency has a relationship
with Puente de la Salud, a respected charity who specialise in the promotion of
Amaranth.
Co – founders of the project, Anna and Antonia Bruce will oversee the residency
alongside previous First Food residents who will be engaged to support the artists
in residence for research and social activities. There will be regular documentation
of the work produced as a record of activities.
APPLICATION GUIDELINES
This residency in Mexico is open to all interpretations. However, there must be a
visual expression to the completed work that can be included in a ‘pop up’
exhibition at the end of the residency, and be called upon for future exhibitions with
the First Food Residency.
Proposals must be sent as PDFs to the following address by 10am on the 17th
April 2017: [email protected]
In the proposal the following information should be included:
⁃ Name
⁃ Age
⁃ Address
⁃ A recent photograph
⁃ CV
⁃ Biography (100 to 200 words)
⁃ Details of exhibitions and / or artistic works published
⁃ Three examples of works, including images, date of completion and dimensions.
⁃ In case of a performance artist, please include links to pictures or videos.
⁃ Objectives and creative intent (300-500 words)
⁃ A work schedule, describing in detail how you will use the time to carry the
investigation and completion of the work.
⁃ description of the type of space required to work and the necessary materials. ⁃
Description of other requests for funding (if any)
⁃ A letter of recommendation from an art institution or a recognised artist, which can
be both UK or Mexico.
⁃ Spanish level: Advanced / Intermediate / Basic / Non-existent
With the support of UABJO, First Food Residency is able to offer workspace
and facilitation of research. Chelsea, UAL will organise flights and provide a
stipend for the stay.
For more information contact us on email: [email protected]
During their stay in Mexico, the artists in residence will have the opportunity to
access facilities through UABJO, technical support and additional facilitation
through First Food to source materials and contacts outside of UABJO.
Facilities include sculpture and printing workshops, photography and digital
workshops. For textile students, relationships have been built with the weaving
villages who can offer access to looms and help with materials. The residency
also offers communication with and visits to farms through local charity Puente de
la Salud.

Sigune Hamann | Heimlich and Freshers (Re-lation) @ Ashmolean

Heimlich and Freshers (Re-lation)

Photographic installations by Sigune Hamann Free display, Gallery 51

Throughout the week, photographic work by artist Sigune Hamann, Reader in Art and Media Practice at the University of the Arts, London will be on display in the Museum. In Gallery 51 on the second floor, her series of landscape photographs ‘Heimlich’ hangs alongside the Ashmolean’s collection of small oil landscapes. On the Chantrey Stairs, between the ground floor and the second floor, are images from her current collaboration with the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, ‘Freshers (Re-lation)’.

Wednesday 15 March

Looking and perceiving in the Ashmolean With Sigune Hamann, artist 11am – 1pm, meet in Gallery 21 at 10.50am Artist Sigune Hamann leads a walking conversation through the Ashmolean’s paintings collection and her own photographic work, temporarily installed in the galleries, addressing questions of how and what we see, and the ways in which our perception of images can be transformed according to how we look at them. This event is limited to 12 participants. Booking essential. https://tickets.ox.ac.uk/WebStore/shop/ViewItems.aspx?CG=ash&C=SpecEvents

other way round

other way round

7 – 9 March | Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Arts

an exhibition by new PhD Students

other way round can mean many things: is it that we have gone the wrong way and should recalculate our itinerary? Or that we are on our way to totally uncharted territory? In this case, we are attempting to make visible diverse approaches to practice-based research. This 1st year PhD students’ exhibition brings together samples of research practice from very different fields, and tries to grow conversations from them. Spanning over fine arts, design and curating, the confrontation of this diverse work in one common space aims to create meaning from these impromptu interactions. By crystallising our ongoing practice at an arbitrary moment in
the PhD journey, we hope to offer a view of the research process and learn from it, as much as we hope to provide food for thought.

Event Programme

Tuesday 7th March 

12-6pm

Neil Farnan

Monopoly to Utopoly – a utopian exchange
The board game Monopoly encapsulates key features
of our economy and celebrates some of its worst
aspects.
This ubiquitous game normalises socially useless
rentier behaviour, although the intention of the original
version was to do the opposite.
Join us in evaluating this particular economic
model and engage with new values, properties and
currencies to design a more utopian economy.
Or pop in later to have fun playing the redesigned
Utopoly game.

Wednesday 8th March

12-3pm
Ana Teles
Copying, transcribing, mimicking, repeating
artists’ paintings
During the period of the exhibition, Ana T. will be
engaging in conversations with artists negotiating her
approach to the copying of their work.

4-6pm
Emma Gradin
Slow Work
What is time? What is worth taking time over? An open
conversation with a group of people including artists,
activists, anthropologists.

Thursday 9th March

12-3pm
Laetitia Forst
Textiles for Disassembly
Design for disassembly exists in everyday products
so as to allow for easy recycling. The visitors are
invited to reflect on how it can be applied to their own
consumption habits and influence their perception of
materials.

3-6pm
Timothy Smith
Sound/Memory/Landscape
An audiovisual dialogue.

6-8pm
Closing reception

All exhibits will be on display 7-9th March 12-6pm. If you wish to attend scheduled events, please refer to this programme.

 

Call for Papers – Robot Futures: Vision and Touch in Robotics symposium

 

This one-day symposium, to take place at the Science Museum, London, on 8th July 2017, will bring together engineers, scientists, cultural theorists and artists to explore notions of embodiment and telepresence in the field of robotics and in virtual and augmented realities.

Humans are embodied in robotic explorers; endowing them with ‘eyes and hands’ robots are able to relate perceptions and experiences of places and objects physically unavailable to us. Although such robots might not ‘look’ human, it is the desire to see stereoscopically, and to feel through all the senses that grant robots anthropomorphic qualities; we see and feel through the robot. In this way robots enable a more embodied experience, which is nonetheless mediated. The development of virtual reality technologies is increasingly enabling us to see and feel as the robot in order to get closer to a more immersive experience.

We invite established and emerging researchers to submit abstracts for paper presentations that address notions of embodiment, telepresence, vision and touch specifically regarding robotics and virtual and augmented realities. We welcome proposals from the arts & humanities and the sciences, particularly from researchers whose work spans both fields.

Please email Luci Eldridge and Nina Trivedi at [email protected] with paper proposals, of 500 words max, by 9pm on Friday 3rd March 2017. Please include a one-page CV with your paper proposal. Feel free to email us with any questions.

Deadline for submissions – Friday 3rd March 2017

Email: [email protected]

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Call For Papers: Fascism & the International: The Global Oder Today & Tomorrow

Mexico City, June 18-20, 2017

Re-posted from Toynbee Prize Foundation

For readers interested in the international dimensions of fascism, here’s an exciting (and topical) call for applications for an interdisciplinary workshop  to be held at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Mexico City:

Paper proposals for this workshop on the international dimensions of fascism are warmly invited from scholars, artists and activists working in and across the fields of international law, history, history of art, international relations, postcolonial studies, sociology, anthropology, political theory, geography, feminist studies, queer theory and critical race theory.

In light of the recent and very rapid re-centering of fascist discourse and iconography across the world, the workshop aims to take fascism and its concept of the international seriously as distinctive, perhaps even inevitable consequences of the unification of ‘the world’ as such since 1492.

While the workshop leans towards the field of international law, its character is strongly interdisciplinary. Interventions (including textual, visual and aural interventions) from individuals and groups working in all disciplines are welcome.

We are delighted to say that the workshop is being hosted by the Museo de Arte Moderno (MAM) in Mexico City. The MAM, itself a landmark in modernist architecture, is home to one of the most important collections of anti-fascist art in Latin America. An introduction to and tour of this collection will be included in the workshop’s activities.

The topics we expect to be investigating include (but are by no means limited to):
** The international dimensions of neo-fascist groups like Golden Dawn and the ‘Alt-Right’, together with their historical connections to(and disconnections from) inter-war fascist movements;
** The innovations made by fascist international lawyers and theorists of the international in the1920s and 1930s in Italy, Japan, France, Germany, Argentina and elsewhere;
** The relationship between decolonisation, fascism and anti-colonial theory in Indonesia,Martinique, Ethiopia and elsewhere in the Third World;
** The political economy of fascism;
** The influence of fascist ideas and practices on post-War dictatorships, both in the Third World and in the West;
** The fascist and anti-fascist history of everyday concepts such as environmentalism,motherhood, freedom, space and accumulation;
** The relationship between fascism/anti-fascism and Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and other art movements both during the inter-war period and today.

Abstracts should be sent to the workshop’s organiser, Rose Sydney Parfitt (Melbourne Law School/Kent Law School), at [email protected] no later than 1 March 2017. The organizers of the conference note that spaces are “very limited,” so apply soon! For more information, see the workshop Facebook page.

Call for Papers | MIRAJ | Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Moving Image Review & Art Journal | Issue 7:2

Transnationalism and South Asian Artists’ Moving Image

Call for Papers | Deadline: 1 March 2017

This issue will be guest edited by Rashmi Sawhney and Lucia King.

The uncontestably global ecologies of contemporary moving image art have invited some deliberation on questions of regional aesthetics, identity, circulation and transnationalism. Yet such discussions have mainly taken place in the context of exhibiting ‘non-western’ art in the western world. Contradictions still persist in the project of destabilizing assumed hierarchies within the Euro-American art world (in the most recent Documenta XI and Venice Biennale, for example) whilst artists of the global South gain currency primarily by meeting the expectations of ‘western’ art markets. Furthermore, Euro-American art historical discourse remains negligent of film and video art’s legacies from the South, including experimental film and screen-based arts. As a consequence, moving image art by ‘non-western’ artists is either caged into essentialist frameworks founded on mythical notions of ‘authenticity’, or stirred into the melting pot of contemporary art without due attention to their particular cultural and aesthetic contexts. This MIRAJ issue, therefore, engages with the particularities of film and video art practices from South Asia, and leverages these in theorising the relationship between regional, global and transnational moving image cultures.

To address some of these gaps in scholarship, this special edition of MIRAJ focuses on the circuits of production, exhibition and authoring of South Asian artists moving image in order to chart key theoretical terrains of ‘regional’ practices in a global context. We solicit articles from artists, critics and curators who work within and outside South Asia, that highlight conceptual frameworks and offer insights on the multi-layered relationships between ‘home and the world’, region and identity, aesthetics and translatability, cultural specificities and contexts of classification/consumption/circulation. We invite articles that build upon foundational work in South Asian moving image art and film histories as well as transnational art practices and aesthetics.

We are particularly interested in articles that address the following:

• Theories of film and video art outside of the ‘national’ framework that are attentive to influences, collaborations and exchanges across geographic and political regions.
• Examples of significant regional exchanges and collaborations between artists and filmmakers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
• The relationship between region, identity and moving image practice in South Asia.
• The aesthetic pre-cursors (in a pre-cinematic sense) that influence contemporary moving image art in the region, including investigations of artist(s)’ methodologies.
• Experiments in film and video art that emphasise ‘indigenous forms’.
• Transnational curatorial practices that work with and around the regional/national framework.
• Historicising South Asian moving image art in the post-medium context.
• Spectatorship and post medium/ multi-media art in/from South Asia.
• South Asian artists’ moving image engagement with science, political activism, environmentalism, urbanism etc.
• South Asian artists’ moving image hybridity with alternate media genres, such as experimental film, documentary, and digital media.
• Digital media and the exhibition and distribution of ‘regional’ moving image art.
• Digital archives and curatorial practices in/about South Asian film & video art.

We publish the following types of writing: scholarly articles (5000-7000 words); opinion pieces, feature articles and interviews (3000-5000 words); review essays of books, individual works, exhibitions and events (3000-5000 words). Scholarly articles will be blind peer-reviewed and feature articles and review essays can be peer-reviewed on request. Articles submitted to MIRAJ should be original and not under consideration by any other publication, including online publications. We do not publish articles by artists about their own work, nor reviews by curators or venues about their own exhibitions.

Please submit completed manuscripts only.
Send all contributions by e-mail in Word format to the Editorial Assistant: [email protected].

Deadline for completed articles: 1 March 2017
Image: Prisms of perception, (2010) Artist: Gigi Scaria. Medium: Video installation. (Image courtesy of the artist).

KOREA DAY AT WIMBLEDON COLLEGE OF ARTS

KOREA DAY AT WIMBLEDON COLLEGE OF ARTS

Sat 4th Feb at 2pm

Please join us for a unique celebration of Korean culture at Wimbledon College of Arts.

This is a special kind of Open House event linked with Richard Layzell’s exhibition Korea Town – Noraebang at the Wimbledon Space Gallery, our connections with the Korean University of the Arts in Seoul and our nearby Korean community in New Malden. It is also a chance to experience the reconstruction of a Noraebang karaoke room from New Malden and a homage to Korean sijo poetry.

There will be special guests, including Prof Ko Heesun from K-Arts in Seoul and artist Jina Lee, an optional Anglican Communion service (all welcome) in English and Korean, where prayers will be said for peace in the world, led by the Revd Mark Dean, Chaplain to University of the Arts London, and Revd Soon-han Choi, Chaplain to University of West London, and refreshments.

Most of all this is a celebration of the uniqueness of Korean culture and our Korean friends who live and study in London.

WIMBLEDON COLLEGE OF ARTS

UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS LONDON

MERTON HALL ROAD

LONDON SW19 3QA

Concrete Poetry: UK Networks & Connections – Research Symposium

A CCW & CSM research event part of University of the Arts London (UAL) Research Fortnight 2017

Date: 15 March 2017
Venue: Chelsea College of Arts (Banqueting Hall), University of the Arts London
Admission free 
After decades of scarce academic interest in Concrete poetry, over the last few years a
number of UK-based researchers have started to produce new work, including several
PhD projects (some now completed), approaching this complex subject from both
artistic and literary perspectives.

Concrete poetry, originally a literary movement heavily influenced by Modernist art
(Constructivism and Concrete art), appeared in Brazil, Germany and Switzerland in
the mid-1950s, and was characterized for privileging the visual (typographical)
arrangement of words over more traditional elements of the poem (sound and
meaning). It was adopted by visual artists and incorporated into art practice during
the early and mid-1960s, becoming an international phenomenon through a network
of little magazines, self-publishing and a few influential exhibitions, with the UK
playing an important role in this development.

This would be the first symposium held in the UK aiming at bringing together
academic researchers working in the field of Concrete poetry. Presenters will be
invited to talk about their current topics of work, with panel discussions providing an
overview of the current state of the investigation. There will be a general theme, UK
networks and connections in Concrete poetry, but the emphasis would be for
researchers active in this area to present their recent work.

The symposium will present new, original contributions to our knowledge of the
complex relations of literature and the visual arts, making explicit multiple forms and
examples of mutual influence within experimental practices during the 1960s.
Although the perspective would be primarily historical, it will also be relevant to
current expanding fields like conceptual writing and artists’ writing and publishing.

Programme:
9.45 Welcome/Opening: Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Morning panel
Chair: Dr Michael Asbury 10.00 Paper 1 Dr Steve Willey
10.30 Paper 2 Nicola Simpson
11.00 Paper 3 Gustavo Grandal Montero

(Break 11.30-11.45)

11.45 Paper 4 Dr Greg Thomas
12.15 Paper 5 Alice Tarbuck
12.45 Panel discussion
(1.00pm Lunch break)

Afternoon panel
Chair: Dr Alison Green
2.00pm Paper 6 Dr Michael Asbury
2.30pm Paper 7 Dr Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação 3.00pm Paper 8 Jasmin Wrobel
3.30pm Paper 9 Dr Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

(Break 4-4.15pm)

4.15pm Keynote: ‘Concrete Poetry: Then and now’, Prof. Stephen Bann
4.45pm Panel discussion
5pm Ends

Organised by Gustavo Grandal Montero, PhD candidate, Central Saint Martins (UAL)
and Academic Support Librarian, Chelsea College of Arts / Camberwell College of Arts
(UAL) [email protected]
Advisory panel: Michael Asbury, Alison Green, Jo Melvin (UAL). Nicola Simpson
(NUCA) and Greg Thomas (Edinburgh).

An exhibition of Concrete poetry from the nationally important holdings in the Special
Collections at Chelsea College of Arts Library will be held 13-31 March to coincide with
the symposium, highlighting the role of UAL archives and special collections in PhD
research. Exhibition open to UAL staff and students, alumni and SCONUL members
during library opening hours. External visitors by appointment only.

Image: Futura, issues 1-26. Courtesy of Hansjörg Mayer.

Speakers:

Prof. Oriana Baddeley, Dean of Research, UAL
Welcome/Opening

Dr. Steve Willey
Visual and verbal permutations in the work of Bob Cobbing Over the last ten years and on both sides of the Atlantic, ‘Make perhaps this out sense of can you’ (1963), a seventeen-line permutation poem by British Concrete Poet Bob Cobbing, has repeatedly been used as the point of access into the world of Cobbing. In 2007 the poem’s title was used as the name for an intermedia event and exhibition of Cobbing materials at the Rosenwald Gallery in the Van-Pelt Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania. In 2011, a BBC Radio 4 documentary on Cobbing used the poem’s title, as did an academic symposium on Cobbing’s work held at Chelsea College of Arts in 2015. This paper argues that using ‘Make Perhaps This Out Sense of Can You’ to signal a critical engagement with Cobbing’s work today, revisits and amplifies relationships between criticism (the making of sense) and community (the making of a ‘School’) that were operating on the poem at the point of its composition in 1963, and further explores broader relationships between permutation and British Concrete poetry.

Nicola Simpson
the sun-cheese wheel-ode and other no things: performing no thingness in the work of dom sylvester houédard, ken cox & li yuan chia
This paper will focus on performing no thingness, the exhibition I recently curated for East Gallery at Norwich University of the Arts (2016). Exhibiting the previously unseen book of onomasticons by dsh, the rarely shown five elemental balloon poem by Ken Cox, and magnetic multiples by Li Yuan Chia, the intention was to demonstrate how, for each artist, performance was central to their understanding and making of poemobjects, poemscores and poemenvironments. These three artists all knew each other, sharing an interest in the Eastern Buddhisms and Taoisms that present objects not as things but as relationships, events and actions. Concluding with a screening of the documented performance of “the sun-cheese wheel-ode a double-rolling-gloster memorial for kencox”, I will illustrate how my doctoral research and curatorial practice has been engaged with (re)performing the archive of dsh to create a space “in which words wld move thru the air”.

Gustavo Grandal Montero
Materialising language: concrete poetry and UK art schools in the mid-1960s
The topic of my research is the relation between Concrete poetry and conceptual art, and the ‘turn to language’ in visual arts during the 1960s. During this decade, a large number of artists embraced ‘new’ media and dematerialised practices, with a significant proportion using language/text as the basis of their work, notably conceptual artists. My presentation will concentrate on the adoption of Concrete poetry by artists and designers based in UK art schools, and its rapid evolution in the central years of the decade (1964-1967), as evidenced at Chelsea School of Art in the collaborations of Edward Wright (dsh, John Furnival, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Stephen Bann, etc.) and the work of Tom Edmonds and others.

Dr. Greg Thomas
The provincial sixties: Literary and artistic culture in the Midlands, West Country and Wales
This paper will explore regional literary and artistic communities during what Arthur Marwick calls the “long sixties” (ca. 1958-74), focusing especially on centres of activity in the Midlands, West Country and Wales. The aim is to interrogate London-centric conceptions of the era’s defining cultural trends by exploring the socio-cultural backdrops and literary and artistic outputs of these alternative cultural centres, emphasising their relationship to defining “sixties” genres such as concrete poetry. The first part of my paper will explore current conceptions of the sixties focused upon London as a hub of literary and artistic activity, established partly by influential memoirs from Jeff Nuttall’s Bomb Culture to Barry Miles’s In the Sixties. I will then sketch out a number of alternative sixties cultural centres, primarily around Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, and Nottingham. Alluding to relevant social and cultural backdrops – the expansion of the university sector, the increasing (and increasingly regionally-focused) provisions of the Arts Councils, the growth of a transnational counter-culture – I will consider the typical operations of such communities, involving independent bookshops, galleries, small presses and magazine series, which became nexuses within national and international cultural networks. These networks were generally connected to North America, and thus to the aesthetics of objectivist, beat and Black Mountain poetry, and of intermedia and pop art; and often with South America and Northern Europe, and thus with the concrete art and poetry movements. Finally, I will consider some exemplary publishing projects of the period, and some of the literature and art produced within such communities. I will allude to some possible implications of this re-adjusted conception of sixties culture by adapting recent insights on late and global modernisms.

Alice Tarbuk
The unstable legacy of concrete poetry in the work of Thomas A. Clark
In 2015 the Hayward Gallery published a work entitled The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century. Amongst emergent concrete and visual artists such as Greg Thomas and Sophie Herxheimer, it was perhaps surprising to see the inclusion of those poet/artists whose work had also formed part of the original concrete poetry ‘renaissance’ of the 1960s, including Stuart Mills, David Bellingham and Thomas A. Clark. (1) (2) It was correct to include Clark amongst the newer visual artist/poets in the anthology, because Clark’s relationship to concrete poetry is neither old nor new: it has been, and continues to be, a major influence on his work.
Indeed, concrete poetry is perhaps the single biggest influence on Clark’s poetic output, and has been since he began making work in the 1960s. In interviews, he credits the wedding gift of an Adana, and his friendship with Ian Hamilton Finlay as the catalysts for his poetic career: he began, then, with concrete poetry. (3)

This paper argues that Clark’s approach to concrete poetry is unusual because, unlike Finlay’s, it persists into the post-concrete era. Clark’s approach to his influences is one of advance and return: he both participates in, and draws back from them, and this is no different for his relationship with concrete poetry, remaining perhaps a little apart from it, even where its influence is clear, making him at once a concrete poet, and a post-concrete poet.
(1) Emmett Williams speaks of ‘the concrete ‘renaissance’ in England, Germany and Sweden during the early sixties’, differentiating this from the first wave of concrete poetry in the 1950s. Williams, Emmett, An Anthology of Concrete Poetry, (New York: Something Else, 1967), p. vii.
(2) Bean, Victoria, Chris McCabe, Kenneth Goldsmith, and Robert Montgomery, The New Concrete: Visual Poetry in the 21st Century, (London: Hayward Gallery, 2015).
(3) ‘The fairly severe limitations of the adana have been a continuing influence on my poetry, as confining and empowering as, let’s say, the haiku or the sonnet.’, Clark, Thomas A. ‘An Inconspicuous Green Flower’ in Bevis, John, Certain trees: the constructed book, poem and object 1964-2006 (Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, France: Centre des livres d’artistes, 2006). p.143.

Dr. Michael Asbury
Haroldo de Campos’ notion of ‘Transcriation’ and the time of art history
This paper draws on the notion of ‘transcriation’ and its relation to poetic writings beyond (but not altogether excluding) the problem of translation within concrete poetry.
Haroldo de Campos responded to works by Helio Oiticica by referring to Ezra Pound’s translation of a Japanese Noh theatre play, the Hagoromo (The Feathered Mantle), as well as the 19th century proto-modernist narrative poem O Guesa Errante (1877) by Joaquim Sousândrade. For Oiticica, the poet’s conjunction invoked further associations, namely with Mallarme’s ‘Un Coup de Des’ and Malevitch’s ‘White on White’, which manifested themselves respectively in films such as ‘Agripina e Roma Manhattan’ and in installation projects such as the Magic Square series. Transcriation thus becomes a means of reconsidering Oiticica’s so-called turn to transmedia which uproots his work from the genealogy of concrete/neococoncrete art placing it under the umbrella of conceptual art.

This example, as limited and specific as it may be, demonstrates nevertheless that the disjunctive temporalities present within the work of contemporary art may far exceed the scope of the consensual time of art history. This complex and transnational matrix of historical references invokes in these works of art hopefully serves to demonstrate the limitations of discourses based on stylistic precedence and more recent proposals purporting the advent of global-art movements such as global conceptualism, ‘other primary structures’, global-pop and so forth.

Dr. Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação
(Re-)interpretations and (mis-)readings: Brazilian, English and Scottish exchanges
The objective of this paper is to examine the dialogue between the Concrete Poets in Brazil and the United Kingdom. The term “Concrete” is generally applied to a variety of artistic movements that followed the post-war frustration with traditional forms of art. Part of a collective search for new artistic materials, Concrete Poetry is the product of two traditions that emerged in the fifties, one of the Bolivian-born Swiss writer, Eugene Gomringer, and the other the Brazilian Noigandres group formed by Haroldo de Campos, Augusto de Campos and Décio Pignatari. Through a productive dialogue, Gomringer and Noigandres brought together these two distinctive artistic projects and disseminated the movement worldwide. Through the analysis of the private exchange of letters, journals, books and artistic objects between Brazilian and British Concrete Poets, more specifically Ian Hamilton Finlay and Edwin Morgan, I wish to shed some light on the cultural and artistic reception of the movement in the United Kingdom. I also wish to argue that this personal form of distribution generated major changes in the poetics of Concrete Poetry as a whole.
Jasmin Wrobel

Transtemporal and trans-spatial dialogues in Haroldo de Campos’ ‘Galáxias’ Latein Amerika Institute – Freie Universität Berlin In the short metatext “dois dedos de prosa sobre uma nova prosa” which accompanies the publication of the first fragments of Galáxias in the literary journal Invenção in 1964, the Brazilian concrete poet Haroldo de Campos defines his book project as a work where “tudo [é] anônimo”, but “personalíssimo” (Campos 1964: 112-113). Indeed, the book reflects the Haroldian cosmos and comprises not only his literary predilections and theoretical interests, but also his journeys and encounters between 1959 and 1976. In my presentation, I would like to illustrate some of the text’s facets that interact on a synchronic level in the “umbigodomundolivro”/”naveloftheworldbook” Galáxias. I intend to emphasize the transtemporal and transpatial poetic mappings and the world literary dialogue in the polyphonic fragments. In a second step, I would like to show in how far the book can also be read as a poetic “Zeitzeugnis”/testimony of the 20th century.

Dr. Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

Concrete poetry and music: connections and counterpoints This presentation will highlight the relations between concrete poetry and music. Focusing on the dialogues between compositional procedures of contemporary music and poetics of concrete poetry, the idea is to hermeneutically analyse how these were of mutual influence, especially observing musical aesthetics of the XX century, such as Serialism, Dodecaphonism and Concrete music. Some examples will be discussed and some Brazilian concrete poetry and popular music will be more comprehensively analysed.

Prof. Stephen Bann
Keynote – Concrete poetry: Then and now
Ian Hamilton Finlay’s decision not to contribute to John Sharkey’s projected anthology of concrete poetry in 1970 marked an irreversible step in his development as a poet and artist. Fundamental differences which separated his approach from that of the London-based poets had come to the fore. This paper will consider two aspects of the poetic experiment of the period that seem relevant today in the light of this disaffiliation. I will look at the conspectus of externally sited works produced for the Brighton Festival of April 1967 – which took place just half a century ago, and also involved staff and students of Chelsea College of Art in a major way. I will also examine how Finlay’s production of folding cards from that period onwards continued to extend the range and potentiality of the concrete poem.

The Millbank Atlas Closing Event

Please join the students of BA ISD DRS07 for a celebration of The Millbank Atlas, an exhibition of their recent work and public programme of related events.
 
Thursday 26 January 2017
5pm – 8pm
Cookhouse Gallery
Chelsea College of Arts
London SW1P 4JU

We look forward to seeing you there!
Dr Marsha Bradfield + Shibboleth Shechter

Image credit: Evans Ye

Transpersonal: Elizabeth A. Povinelli

8 Feb 20172:00 pm | Cinema 1 | £3.00 to £5.00 Book Tickets

Elizabeth A. Povinelli is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University where she has also been the Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Law and Culture. She is the author of numerous books and essays as well as a former editor of the academic journal Public Culture.

Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an “anthropology of the otherwise”. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and three films with the Karrabing Film Collective including Wutharr, The Saltwater, 2016 which premiered at Sydney Biennale and was winner of the 2015 European Visible Award.

This lecture is the fourth in a series entitled Transpersonal: art and life directives, ten lectures which will engage with the production of psychotechnologies, socio-political awareness and art and design practices in an automated reality. Each lecture will explore the ways in which the term transpersonal relays states of consciousness that go beyond the limits of personal identity.

Transpersonal: art and life directives is a lecture series on the theory and application of art and design, curated and convened by Dr. Stephen Wilson. It is staged in collaboration with the ICA and the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon College of Arts postgraduate community at the University of the Arts London.

Image: Karrabing Film Collective, Wutharr: Saltwater Dreams, 2016.