Bentham and the Arts

Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon’s Graduate School Director and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Malcolm Quinn, is co-convening a seminar series on Bentham and the Arts.

The seminar series will consider the sceptical challenge presented by Jeremy Bentham’s hedonistic utilitarianism to the existence of the aesthetic, as represented in the oft-quoted statement that, ‘Prejudice apart, the game of push-pin is of equal value with the arts and sciences of music and poetry. If the game of push-pin furnish more pleasure, it is more valuable than either.’ This statement is one part of a complex set of arguments on culture, taste, and utility that Bentham pursued over his lifetime, in which sensations of pleasure and pain were opposed to aesthetic sensibility.

Hosted by the Bentham Project and Faculty of Laws, University College London and the University of the Arts, London

Sponsored by UCL Faculty of Laws; UCL Bentham Project; and the International Society for Utilitarian Studies (ISUS)

Co convenors: Anthony Julius (UCL); Malcolm Quinn (UAL); Philip Schofield (UCL)

All seminars take place on Tuesday evenings, at 6.00 pm, at UCL.  All are welcome.

The seminars on 30 January, 20 February, 6 March and 20 March 2018 will take place in G10 Lecture Theatre, Chandler House, 2 Wakefield Street, London, WC1N 1PF.

The remaining seminars will take place in the Moot Court, Bentham House, Endsleigh Gardens, London, WC1H 0EG.

For abstracts of papers, please consult the full programme.

30 January 2018 BENTHAM SYMPOSIUM. Bentham’s Challenge to Aesthetics: Benjamin Bourcier (Catholic University of Lille); Malcolm Quinn (University of the Arts, London); Philip Schofield (UCL)
20 February 2018 Anthony Julius (UCL): Who was the greater champion of literature, Bentham or Mill?
6 March 2018 Stella Sandford (Kingston): ‘Envy accompanied with Antipathy’: Bentham and Freud on the Psychology of Sexual Ressentiment
20 March 2018 Tim Milnes (Edinburgh): Bentham, Romanticism, and the Arts
1 May 2018 Frances Ferguson (Chicago): Jeremy Bentham’s Expansive Aesthetics: Pushpin Too
22 May 2018 Emmanuelle de Champs (Cergy-Pointoise): Bentham and Dumont on Taste and Literature
29 May 2018 Carey Young (UCL): tbc
5 June 2018 Fran Cottell (University of the Arts London) and Marianne Mueller (Architectural Association): Pentagon Petal: from Pain to Pleasure
19 June 2018 Carolyn Shapiro (Falmouth): The Image of Bentham

For enquiries please contact Phil Baker, UCL Laws: [email protected] (020 3108 8480).

Call for Papers: Victorian Patterns

The British Association for Victorian Studies is holding its 2018 annual conference at the University of Exeter, 29-31 August 2018 on the topic ‘Victorian Patterns’.

Pattern in the nineteenth century was a much-debated topic. The execution of repetitive forms of design became both industrialized and institutionalized thanks to new techniques of mechanized production. Everywhere the surfaces of material culture were alive with a profusion of ornamental patterns. An insatiable appetite for pattern affected the appearance of public spaces, domestic interiors, clothing and the objects of everyday life. At the same time, revolutions in science and technologies, in the global circulation of people, commodities and ideas, and in the conception and creation of new forms explored and exploited the ways in which patterns, both cultural and natural, shape and organize experience and subjectivity. Pattern was (and is) often seen as repetitive, constraining, unimaginative, and deadening, but patterns also live, energizing, structuring, and acting both within and beyond the reach of human intentionality and subjectivity. This conference will explore the life of pattern in the nineteenth century and the way in which in its contradictions, its reproducibility and its close connections with materiality and the everyday, pattern can be seen as a representative natural, aesthetic, cultural and techno-scientific mode. We invite proposals for individual papers of 15 minutes or 3-paper panel sessions, and we would particularly welcome alternative session formats designed to foster discussion or pose research problems for discussions (e.g. poster presentations, 3×5 minute position papers, roundtables or working groups, etc.) on, but not limited to, the following topics:

• Patterns in nature: temporal (geologic, seasonal), energy, physics, evolution.

• Scientific and technological patterns: mathematics, markets, engineering, textiles, city-planning.

• Patterns of imagery: language, style, and genre.

• Design and decorative patterns: arts, crafts, ornament, textiles, The House Beautiful, book design.

• Music and metrical patterns, poetics, performance.

• Global patterns: travel and circulation; settlement and empire; inheritance.

• Repetitions, replications, rhythm, habits, habitus, disruption of pattern, linearity, circularity, randomness, emergence, chaos.

• Patterns of behaviour and mood.

Please submit an individual proposal of 250-300 words or a group proposal of 1000 words to [email protected] by the deadline of Tuesday 3rd of April. All proposals should include your name, email address and academic affiliation (if applicable).

See Call for papers PDF below…

BAVS 2018 CFP small

 

Annabel Dover | The Dream Lives of Objects | 24 Jan 2018

Artist Annabel Dover will talk about her residency at the British School at Athens and our multivalent relationship to objects.

24th January 2018 | Lecture Theatre, Chelsea College of Arts

6pm-8pm

Images – C-type prints – City Plaza Hotel, Series I, II, III, IV, V

For my residency at the British School at Athens I looked at Athens through the prism of personal narratives. When I was 13, my father already gone, my mother left home to live in Athens. She never returned. My research at the British School at Athens focused on the Finlay Museum whilst retracing my mother’s steps in Athens, according to her letters; making drawings, paintings and three-dimensional objects that respond to the leftover human traces I found in these areas. The designer Phillipe Stark remarked that to understand a city you must first look in its rubbish bins. In a series of three-dimensional works, I used the crumbs of gold leaf I found outside the Hotel des Anglais, Syntagma Square, leftover by the hotel’s recent ironwork gilding. I made everyday objects akin to the dice, coins and shells found in the Ancient Athenian Agora Museum, out of Jesmonite and then gilded them with the found gold leaf. I scattered these in the Ancient Agora and photographed them in situ. I made watercolours that take their glittering translucent appearance from a small rock I found in the Ancient Agora. A jeweller in the Plaka, skilled in the art of Lapis Lazuli carving, ground it down for me and I have added it to gum Arabic (from The Acacia Senegal tree, from the Sudan). The Ancient Agora seems so alive with Tortoises, Hoopoes, Swallows and plants that I wanted some of this organic life to become part of my document of Athens. These scraps of the recent past are then woven together to form a new narrative

My chief research focus whilst at the British School at Athens engaged with the school’s research theme of ‘building the archive’. My PhD research focused on presenting an alternative taxonomy. My study of the early photographer Anna Atkins looked at the specimens she presents less as conclusive evidence, more reflecting on them as a starting point to explore her biography. Whilst in Athens I documented accidental artefacts left behind by the people who catalogued the Finlay Museum; items such as an airmail envelope with notes on, or discarded pieces of paper with the item numbers of the potsherds in the collection. I made paintings and drawings of these artefacts alongside the displayed artefacts of the Finlay Museum and presented these works in a loose-leaf album.

I volunteered at City Plaza Hotel, a hotel that went bankrupt in the crash of 2007, now a refugee hostel. I photographed groups of objects belonging to the residents of the hostel: bags of earth brought from their home countries, rose petals they collected and sometimes I collected for them that their mothers put in their bras to make them smell nice, oranges they picked from the trees that grow on the streets of Athens that they ate. Cigar ends that belonged to the rich men of Athens that they dreamt of being. Lucky charms Greek people they met had given to them when they were ill and the toys that became dirty on their long journey to Greece.

My time at the BSA provided me with an overwhelming amount of material that will continue to influence my work in the future. I would particularly like to focus on the wildlife of the Ancient Agora site. I have used humane moth traps in the past and I would be very interested in documenting the moths of the Ancient Athenian Agora, as a metaphor for the life of the city returning after dark. Among the other areas of research, I encountered at the BSA, that I am very interested to follow are: archeological squeezes and the indexical parallels they have with the cyanotype, the works of Piet de Jong and Alice Lidsell’s botanical notebook who was resident at the BSA 1930-31 and whose watercolours are now housed by Newnham College, Cambridge.

 

GRADUATE SCHOOL PUBLIC PROGRAMME | 2017-2018 | SPRING TERM

CAMBERWELL, CHELSEA, WIMBEDON GRADUATE SCHOOL

PUBLIC PROGRAMME 2017-2018 | SPRING TERM


SYMPOSIUM

Shame on You: Theorising shame, pride and community in contemporary culture

Photograph by Christa Holka.

10.00 – 19.00 Friday, 09 February 2018, 

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts 16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU

 Recent advances in ‘equality’ have seen an explosion of pride within the LGBT community but what has been gained and what has been lost by insisting that we are proud to be gay?
In this day-long symposium we will cast light on contemporary manifestations of the relations between shame and stigma, exposure, conformity and power.

This event is convened by Jordan McKenzie, Associate Lecturer, BA Drawing

Camberwell College of Arts, and Akosua Bonsu (Fringe Centre, UCL).

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/shame-on-you-symposium


SYMPOSIUM

Encountering Difference  

Image: Akiko Takizawa, Shadows on the Hill (2009, date printed: 2013). Collotype on Japanese Washi Paper. Courtesy of the artist.        

10.00 – 18.00 Friday, 23 February 2018

Lecture Theatre, Camberwell College of Arts, 45-65 Peckham Road, London SE5 8UF

Focusing on themes of identity, the visual and non-visual representations of race, gender, sexuality, class, language, power, desire and aesthetics, this one-day symposium, will present the findings from the Difference Goes Speed Dating event, which hosted a series of encounters between artists, students, academics and industry specialists engaged in lens-based media practices. We will discuss current and alternative ways of picturing difference in contemporary lens-based practices and beyond.

This event is convened by Dr Ope Lori, TrAIN Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and BA Fine Art Associate Lecturer at Chelsea College of Arts.

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/encounterdifference


WORKSHOP

Adaptation, Re-make, Risk-taking: Creative intervention in contemporary theatre and performance

Image courtesy: Blind Dinner Date, ZU-UK. http://zu-uk.com/

10.00 – 17.00 Saturday, 03 March 2018

Wimbledon Theatre Space, Wimbledon College of Arts, Merton Hall Road, London SW19 3QA

Adaptation, Re-make, Risk-taking aims to take a fresh look at the reinterpretation of pre-existing sources in contemporary performance, and situates radical intervention as an innovative and risk-taking form of adaptation for the stage.

This event is convened by Dr Jozefina Komporaly, Lecturer in Theatre and Screen Studies at Wimbledon College of Arts.

Very limited amount of tickets available.
Early booking recommended:

http://bit.ly/ZUUK-UAL


AFTERNOON SYMPOSIUM

Speculative Design: Afrofuturist and indigenous projections

Image: Elizabeth La Pensee, She Carries the Water. Courtesy of the artist.

14.00 – 20.00 Friday, 09 March 2018

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts, 16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU

This afternoon symposium brings together researchers and practitioners whose work engages with the themes of Afrofuturism, Indigenous Futures, and other emerging areas of science-fictional/future-orientated cultural practice in which people of colour, indigenous cultures and non-Western subjects take centre stage.

This event is convened by Dr Dan Smith, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art Theory, Chelsea College of Arts.

Booking essential:

http://bit.ly/speculative-design

 

 

 

To mark the end of Lana Locke’s PhD on The feral, the art object and the
social, she will create a sprawling installation of objects, images and videos in
Chelsea College of Arts’ Cookhouse Gallery that make flesh the practice-based
nature of her research.

Here, the practice becomes entangled in an unruly relation with the space:
scratched, seeping forms evoking bodily organs, liquids and waste do not rest
within the contours of a body, but act as infectious elements, moving through the
environment, speaking to a social body uncontained by the gallery. Clay tower
blocks and burnt out metal plants germinate amongst the husks of Locke’s external
and internal installations and protests of the last four years, rejecting
gentrification, as she seeks to reclaim the social within the material.

Locke’s conception of the feral scavenges (physically, socially and
metaphorically) in the gap between defined spaces, and draws out the political
promise of the indeterminate state of being neither wild nor
civilised. Originating as a retaliation against the former British Lord Chancellor
Kenneth Clarke’s labelling of a ‘feral underclass’ in the 2011 London riots, she
seeks to unfix the feral from this uncivilised, abject position. Her practice
resists the ‘civilising’ borders of the spheres of display it interpenetrates.
However, like the feral, it does not attack the boundaries directly: it is
furtive; it must creep over, under and through the boundaries to survive.

The Cookhouse space is treated as a physical manifestation of the academic
framework of an arts PhD, and the institutional rigidity, regulation, and
political and economic pressures the practice has sought to gnaw away at when
confronted by this structure. Yet as Locke equates the temporary installation of
art objects in the space to the status of squatters passing through, the days of
her own squatting period of doctoral study have reached their end, its contingent
permissions and protection withdrawing. As her practice has poked into, picked at,
and soaked through any porosity and permeability of boundaries, inside and outside
of the rules of the University, that might allow her to leach it for a little more
supply (of workshop access, of materials, of knowledge), so must she now move on.

Call for Papers | Dossier: Cartographies of Design: Stories, Projects, Agendas

This Caiana dossier invites reflection on Design based on the call for texts which, with no geographical boundaries, approaches its configuration as a disciplinary field through the study of phenomena permitting the identification of its problem areas in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Also, it seeks to introduce a questioning of the categories that organized cartographies based on the material conditions of production of artefacts which are today a part of the History of Design, but were created when this discipline did not exist as such.

A historiographical gaze on the constitution of Design as a disciplinary field evidences that, during the last three decades, Design theoreticians and historians intended to distance themselves from accounts legitimating and not problematizing the discipline. Inasmuch as Design consolidated itself and developed as an autonomous area with specific modalities of production of knowledge, it was more open to debating acritical assumptions and normative and prescriptive methodologies.

Design was included in political agendas with various aims in mind: with the promise of representing the space par excellence from which to transform society and the lives of people, in order to produce development and innovation in public administration and policy, with the aim of exploring possible worlds outside the context of immediate necessity although it was also considered a manipulative, deceptive, sumptuary practice. In that framework, we can claim that Design negotiated its boundaries with Art, Economy, Sociology, History, Anthropology, Communication, Geography, Architecture and the Design disciplines, among others, not only because of its constitutively interdisciplinary nature, but also because its problem areas enabled the emergence of new fields of study, such as Design Culture, Visual Culture, Material Culture, Cultural Studies, the Sociology of Culture and Graphic Culture.

This has led us to speak about Culture(s), History (ies) and more recently Economy (ies) of Design to account for the scenarios, not devoid of conflictivity, in which its various objects of study are configured in contemporaneity.

In the context of the discussion about the conditions of possibility of a global history Design, certain characterizations have been criticized which define it as a field for industrially produced artefacts, i.e. machine-made artefacts produced in series. This gaze excluded from historic accounts experiences of countries with very sophisticated Design cultures, but which did not respond to that form of production or in which other relations were hierarchically-ordered, like the pair craftsmanship-design.

Through this appeal, Caiana proposes a dossier dedicated for the first time to the history of Design. Its objective is to foreground the multiple dimensions associated to writing about Design, observing the way in which its institutionalization and its role in political, social, economic or technological visibilization and invisibilization has been problematized by theory, History and practice. Thus, there is an intention to prompt debate by means of case studies and/or the explicitation of historiographic artefacts in which design takes centre stage as an issue or as a device which is a vehicle for meanings and logics which are its own in order to affect and interact with other disciplines.

 

Thematic focuses (not limiting)

Historiographic perspectives of Design histories of Latin American, African and Asian countries.

Problems in the construction of a History on the specificity of design as a form of knowledge.

Europe-US-Latin America dialogs in historiographic construction.

Exchanges between Art History and design.

Construction of otherness and gender perspectives in Design histories.

History of international Design networks and organizations and their Latin American agendas.

Interaction between Art History, Design History and Technology History in the State’s identity construction.

Museum projects, collectionism and Design archives.

Transmedia Design projects and information visualization devices in curatorial scripts for Art exhibitions.

Universal and Industrial Exhibitions.

Design as mediator, facilitator or as an obstacle in the generation, circulation and dissemination of knowledge.

 

The call for papers for this dossier will remain open until January 20, 2018

 

Bear in mind that the magazine is indexed in the catalogue of the Latindex and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) information systems.

 

See publishing guidelines at:

 

 

http://caiana.caia.org.ar/template/caiana.php?pag=../static/normas.php

Yale Center for British Art Residential Scholar Awards – 2018 / 2019

Residential Scholar Awards

The Yale Center for British Art offers three types of short-term residential awards to scholars undertaking research related to British art. While in residence, scholars have access to the Center’s rich holdings of paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, rare books, and manuscripts, as well as primary and secondary reference materials. Scholars are also able to take advantage of the extensive collections at other Yale museums and libraries. They are given a dedicated working space in the Center’s Reference Library and encouraged to participate in events and programs, as well as to engage with the scholarly community of the university.

 

Visiting Scholar Awards

These awards provide academic, museum, and independent scholars, as well as doctoral students, working in any field related to British visual and material culture an opportunity to study the Center’s collection. The closing date for the 2018/2019 award is Monday, January 08, 2018.
Apply Now.

Curatorial Scholar Awards

These awards are intended for curators who are based in museums in the UK and engaged in significant curatorial work in any field of British art. Applications from curators at municipal and regional museums are especially encouraged. The closing date for the 2018/2019 awards is Monday, January 15, 2018. 
Apply Now.

AHRC International Placement Scheme (IPS) Scholar Awards

These awards are open to early career researchers, research assistants, and doctoral students funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. Applications must be made through the AHRC. The call for applications will be announced by the AHRC in the fall of 2017. Applicants should visit the AHRC IPS website

Residential Scholar Awards Brochure

CALL FOR ENTRIES | Difference Goes Speed Dating

Fancy a date with difference?

 

Difference Goes Speed Dating will be hosting a series of encounters between artists, students, academics and industry specialists engaged in lens-based media practices.

Using speed dating as a format, sixteen lucky participants will be joined by four invited artists to form randomised pairs and explore the ways they deal with the concept of difference in their practice. The aim is to survey and to attempt to tackle the issues surrounding difference, which include (and are not limited to) visual and non-visual representations of race, gender, sexuality, class, language, power and desire.

The resulting encounters will culminate in a public symposium, hosted by the Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme and held at Chelsea College of Arts in February 2018. Matched-up participants will present their findings and form further discussions exploring current and alternative ways of picturing difference in contemporary lens-based practices and beyond.

Given the political climate nationally and transnationally, understanding difference and challenging stereotypical perceptions around identity have become imperative. Difference Goes Speed Dating follows on from Professor Robert Storr’s rallying call to action, that “theory has its moment, but there is a time for empirical work” (TrAIN Open lecture, November 2016). This event invites dialogue between artists in creating a visual toolkit for tackling difference, in all its manifestations.

To apply to be a dater, whether student, academic, artist, or industry specialist, please complete this quick online form by Monday 30 October 2017: http://arts.ac.uk/speed-dating

You will be notified of the outcome on the week commencing 6th November 2017.

 

Speed Dating

17.00 20.00 | 29 November 2017

Red Room, Chelsea College of Arts, London

 


Symposium

10.00 – 18.00 | 23 February 2018

Banqueting Hall, Chelsea College of Arts, London

For more information about the workshop please contact Dr Ope Lori: [email protected]

Presented by Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

Ope Lori

This event has been curated by Dr Ope Lori. She is a lens-based artist primarily working with moving-image, interested in the politics of looking practices, race, gender and representation. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and is currently completing a book on encountering difference through the lens. Dr Ope Lori is a TrAIN Post-Doctoral Research Fellow and BA Fine Art Associate Lecturer at Chelsea College of Arts and Lecturer at Leeds Arts University.

Image: Ope Lori, Alpha and Beta (2015). © Ope Lori.

Call For Papers | VISUAL PEDAGOGIES | London 2018

5th Biennial Conference of the

International Association for Visual Culture

September 13 – 15, 2018

UCL Institute of Education

Confirmed Participants:

Jill Casid (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Keynote); Teresa Cisneros (The Showroom); Inés Dussel (Cinvestav, Mexico, Keynote); Joanne Morra (Central Saint Martins); Griselda Pollock (University of Leeds, Keynote); Amanda du Preez (University of Pretoria); Emily Pringle (Tate); Will Strong (Calvert 22); Sofia Victorino  (Whitechapel Gallery)

Can we teach what we see? Can we see what we teach? How is the world changed, reaffirmed, or progressed through the visual? How does it slip back? What impact can thoughtful uses of images in teaching, scholarship, artistic, and political practice have on the future, as well as on the telling of history?

How can we as scholars, practitioners, educators, and concerned citizens of the world see ourselves as teachers of and through the visual, whatever our context?

The International Association for Visual Culture welcomes papers and creative proposals that address the issues of visual pedagogies from different starting points that include but are not limited to:

The visual as a tool for teaching: i.e., teaching through showing, uses of interactive learning tools including Digital Humanities, using the classroom as a space for community involvement or public-facing projects;

Visual pedagogies as a political tool: from the protest image to leveraging an image as a tool for “militant research”;

The teaching of Visual Culture Studies: academia and visual culture, teaching and inventing diverging new methodologies in teaching the significance of visual literacy across disciplines, including the critical consumption and production of images;

Thinking through ways to “decolonize the classroom” in changes in course structure, assigned texts, and assessment;

Different challenges posed across visual media, both historically and in terms of the media themselves: film versus photography; prints versus text; digital versus postdigital;

Interrogating racism, gender and sexual discrimination, ableism, and religious, and ethnic persecution through visual pedagogies;

The significance of the visual in a world where “alternative facts” and “post-truth” discourse is infiltrating public discourse and threatening democracy;

The visual as a scientific instrument: We welcome proposals that tackle the questions of various scientific approaches to visual pedagogies;

Emancipation and the pedagogy of the visual: breaking the ‘all seeing eye,’ including both challenging the truth of the image, and introducing non-ocular-centrism to fields like Visual Culture Studies, Art History, Film Studies, artistic practice, and political engagement.

To submit…

Papers and artistic or live (including interactive) contributions that engage the question of the visual in teaching through a historical lens are also very welcome. Our aim is to use the conference as a platform to discuss not only the pressing issues of the contemporary, but the legacies of visual pedagogies, including how people have leveraged images to teach people “how to see the world” for centuries.

Submission: Proposals should be 250 – 500 words in length and may include supplementary material (i.e., images, videos, links). Please also include an abbreviated CV and/or a link to a professional website.

Please direct all submissions in PDF format to [email protected] by the November 30, 2017 deadline.

Organization: The conference will be organized around a series of keynote speakers, and core thematic panels with breakout sessions. We will assign the core themes based on proposals. We invite anyone interested especially in organizing a “teaching session” (i.e., a demonstration, group activity, etc.) to specify this in their proposal.

Support for speakers and contributors: The IAVC will charge a sliding scale fee for conference attendance. These details will be posted on our website in early 2018. We hope to be able to offer assistance to speakers and contributors who can demonstrate financial need.

Timeline: We will be reviewing submissions in late 2017. We expect a large pool of applications and plan to send our responses to the CFP in February 2018.

Homecoming

If someone told you time traveling was a possibility.

If someone told you they have done it on many occasions.

You would laugh at them, wouldn’t you?

That’s what she had said.

I go over these words in my head

now that I am sitting in the empty hotel room.

I go over these words and I think to myself: can it be true?

The ashtray still containing the ends of the cigarettes she smoked.

It’s not at all how you imagine it.

It’s not at all how you imagine it.

 

Image: Carrick Bell ‘Willing to Die’ 2016, video still

Text:  Hannes Ribarits ‘Ashtray’, 2017, acrylic and spray-paint on canvas (170cm x 170cm)

Opening reception: Tuesday 3 October, 5-8pm

Exhibition runs 4-6 October, 12-6pm

 

An exhibition of works by Carrick Bell (US/DE) and Hannes Ribarits (AT/DE) including immersive installations, paintings, moving image and murals. Curated by Emma Gradin.

 

Triangle Space

Chelsea College of Arts

16 John Islip St, London SW1P 4JU

 

Carrick Bell (b. 1981, Anchorage, AK) received his MFA from SAIC in 2008, and a BA from Hampshire College in 2004. Residencies include Ox-Bow (2009), the Wassaic Project (2016) and NARS Foundation (2017). Recent exhibitions include at Kunsthalle Exnergasse (Vienna), Charim Gallery (Vienna), LW56 (Vienna), .hbc (Berlin), Brooklyn Pavillion of the Shanghai Biennale, and BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music). He is also co-founder and co-director of Berlin-based artist run space HORSEANDPONY Fine Arts.

Hannes Ribarits is a Berlin based artist who graduated from Central Saint Martins College, London and the University of Applied Arts, Vienna. His work has been exhibited or screened in venues such as Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art (Sunderland), HEDAH (Maastricht), Kunstbunker (Nuremberg), pinacoteca (Vienna), The Hayward Gallery (London), Liljevalchs Hubb (Stockholm) and he was selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries (UK). Ribarits also organised the six-part exhibition series Room of Requirement, taking place in different locations in Berlin throughout 2014-15 and co-curated group shows at Ve.Sch (Vienna), Forgotten Bar (Berlin), HORSEANDPONY Fine Arts (Berlin) and Kunsthalle Exnergasse (with Vienna based curator Li Tasser).

Emma Gradin is an independent curator and research student at Chelsea College of Arts developing and deploying curatorial strategies founded on extended states of not-knowing and creative suspension in the current context of time-shortness and accelerated productivity/consumption.